Observation of the hot universe, from 105 K upward, has a vital impact on some of the most fundamental questions in astrophysics today. Hot plasmas, from the sun and stellar coronae to the cores of gamma ray bursts, expose the underpinning physics of observable phenomena: the evolution of largescale structure and nucleosynthesis; the interaction between galaxies and super-massive black holes; the behavior of matter under extreme conditions; the fate of the “missing” baryons; and the life cycle of stars. These topics require state-of-the art instruments on satellites in the UV to gamma-ray domain. In addition, many energetic phenomena including accretion and ejection processes near black holes and various types of transient phenomena exhibit high-energy radiation.

Previous and currently operating space telescopes, such as Chandra, XMM-Newton, FUSE, INTEGRAL, GALEX, RXTE, Hinode, SDO, Swift, Suzaku, FERMI ASTROSAT, HXMT, NICER and SRG and NuSTAR have revolutionized our view of the hot universe. In the future other missions including HERMES, XRISM, SVOM, IXPE and the Einstein Probe will be realized and their expected performance including the calibrations can be presented. At the end of the next decade the ESA large scale mission Athena will be the observatory of choice. However, focused, small and mid-sized missions should complement Athena and full coverage of the UV to gamma-ray wavelength range is equally important to advance science and can be launched at the end of the decase if, selected in the USA MIDEX program. This may range from a new generation of X-ray timing instruments, imaging instruments of missions pushing the spectral resolution, hard X-ray telescopes, gamma-ray instruments, UV instruments or all sky monitors. In addition, it is crucial to explore and develop technology beyond the Athena mission. Technology which will need to be advanced includes large format cryogenic imaging spectrometers, CMOS image arrays, pore optics, adjustable and active optics, multi-layers, x-ray polarimetry, x-ray interferometry, hard x-ray and gamma ray imaging systems.

This conference invites the community to contribute to the discussion of new observatories in the UV to gamma-ray band. The conference will cover, among others, the following issues: major questions in astrophysics that will drive the design of new observatories; lessons learned from existing observatories, both technical and astrophysical; approved and proposed new observatories; technologies in optics and focal planes; and novel concepts.

Papers are solicited on but not restricted to the following topics: ;
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Conference

Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2022: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray

This conference has an open call for papers:
Manuscript Due: 22 June 2022
Observation of the hot universe, from 105 K upward, has a vital impact on some of the most fundamental questions in astrophysics today. Hot plasmas, from the sun and stellar coronae to the cores of gamma ray bursts, expose the underpinning physics of observable phenomena: the evolution of largescale structure and nucleosynthesis; the interaction between galaxies and super-massive black holes; the behavior of matter under extreme conditions; the fate of the “missing” baryons; and the life cycle of stars. These topics require state-of-the art instruments on satellites in the UV to gamma-ray domain. In addition, many energetic phenomena including accretion and ejection processes near black holes and various types of transient phenomena exhibit high-energy radiation.

Previous and currently operating space telescopes, such as Chandra, XMM-Newton, FUSE, INTEGRAL, GALEX, RXTE, Hinode, SDO, Swift, Suzaku, FERMI ASTROSAT, HXMT, NICER and SRG and NuSTAR have revolutionized our view of the hot universe. In the future other missions including HERMES, XRISM, SVOM, IXPE and the Einstein Probe will be realized and their expected performance including the calibrations can be presented. At the end of the next decade the ESA large scale mission Athena will be the observatory of choice. However, focused, small and mid-sized missions should complement Athena and full coverage of the UV to gamma-ray wavelength range is equally important to advance science and can be launched at the end of the decase if, selected in the USA MIDEX program. This may range from a new generation of X-ray timing instruments, imaging instruments of missions pushing the spectral resolution, hard X-ray telescopes, gamma-ray instruments, UV instruments or all sky monitors. In addition, it is crucial to explore and develop technology beyond the Athena mission. Technology which will need to be advanced includes large format cryogenic imaging spectrometers, CMOS image arrays, pore optics, adjustable and active optics, multi-layers, x-ray polarimetry, x-ray interferometry, hard x-ray and gamma ray imaging systems.

This conference invites the community to contribute to the discussion of new observatories in the UV to gamma-ray band. The conference will cover, among others, the following issues: major questions in astrophysics that will drive the design of new observatories; lessons learned from existing observatories, both technical and astrophysical; approved and proposed new observatories; technologies in optics and focal planes; and novel concepts.

Papers are solicited on but not restricted to the following topics:
  • Astrophysical science drivers for new observatories
  • Observational tools required to support the science aims of new major observatories
  • Current missions in UV, x-ray and gamma rays, and their impact on new science and future observatories
  • Approved missions still to be launched: their status and potential impact on the field
  • Proposed small and medium missions and their role in the overall picture of high energy astrophysics
  • Proposed large facilities in UV, x-ray and gamma-rays
  • Technology for future observatories: the latest developments and their potential impact on the capability of new missions
  • Calibration of current and future missions
  • Novel concepts for research beyond in 2030 and beyond (e.g. the US decadal review and Voyage 2050 from ESA)
  • End to end simulations of new facilities
  • Prospects of cube-sats or constellation of small satellites.