Observation of the hot universe, from 105 K upward, has a vital impact on some of the most fundamental questions in astrophysics today. Hot plasmas, from the sun and stellar coronae to the cores of gamma ray bursts, expose the underpinning physics of observable phenomena: the evolution of largescale structure and nucleosynthesis; the interaction between galaxies and super-massive black holes; the behavior of matter under extreme conditions; the fate of the “missing” baryons; and the life cycle of stars. These topics require state-of-the art instruments on satellites in the UV to gamma-ray domain. In addition, many energetic phenomena including accretion and ejection processes near black holes and various types of transient phenomena exhibit high-energy radiation.

Previous and currently operating space telescopes, such as Chandra, XMM-Newton, FUSE, INTEGRAL, GALEX, RXTE, Hinode, SDO, Swift, Suzaku, FERMI ASTROSAT, HXMT, NICER and SRG and NuSTAR have revolutionized our view of the hot universe. In the future other missions including HERMES, XRISM, SVOM, IXPE and the Einstein Probe will be realized and their expected performance including the calibrations can be presented. At the end of the next decade the ESA large scale mission Athena will be the observatory of choice. However, focused, small and mid-sized missions should complement Athena and full coverage of the UV to gamma-ray wavelength range is equally important to advance science and can be launched at the end of the decase if, selected in the USA MIDEX program. This may range from a new generation of X-ray timing instruments, imaging instruments of missions pushing the spectral resolution, hard X-ray telescopes, gamma-ray instruments, UV instruments or all sky monitors. In addition, it is crucial to explore and develop technology beyond the Athena mission. Technology which will need to be advanced includes large format cryogenic imaging spectrometers, CMOS image arrays, pore optics, adjustable and active optics, multi-layers, x-ray polarimetry, x-ray interferometry, hard x-ray and gamma ray imaging systems.

This conference invites the community to contribute to the discussion of new observatories in the UV to gamma-ray band. The conference will cover, among others, the following issues: major questions in astrophysics that will drive the design of new observatories; lessons learned from existing observatories, both technical and astrophysical; approved and proposed new observatories; technologies in optics and focal planes; and novel concepts.

Papers are solicited on but not restricted to the following topics: ;
In progress – view active session
Conference 12181

Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2022: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray

17 - 22 July 2022 | Room 523
View Session ∨
  • 1: UV I
  • 2: UV II
  • 3: Solar
  • Sunday Plenary Session
  • Monday Plenary Session
  • 4: Athena I
  • 5: Athena II
  • 6: Athena Optics
  • Tuesday Plenary Session
  • 7: Optics I
  • 8: Optics II
  • 9: Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma and IXPE
  • Wednesday Plenary Session
  • 10: Transient and Small Satellites I
  • 11: Transient and Small Satellites II
  • 12: Einstein and SVOM
  • Thursday Plenary Session
  • 13: XRISM
  • 14: EXTP
  • 15: Missions Under Development/Proposed
  • 16: Detectors and Miscellaneous
  • 17: Gamma-ray and Polarization
  • Posters - Ultra Violet
  • Posters - Solar
  • Posters - Athena
  • Posters - Athena Optics
  • Posters - Optics
  • Posters - Ongoing Missions
  • Posters - Small Satellites
  • Posters - Missions in Development
  • Posters - XRISM
  • Posters - eXTP
  • Posters - Detectors/Others
  • Posters: Gamma-ray and Polarization
  • Posters
Session 1: UV I
17 July 2022 • 09:00 - 11:30 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
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Author(s): David Ardila, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Evgenya Shkolnik, Arizona State Univ. (United States); John Ziemer, Mark Swain, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); James Owen, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Michael Line, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Parke Loyd, Eureka Scientific, Inc. (United States); Glenn R. Sellar, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Travis Barman, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Courtney Dressing, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); William Frazier, April Jewell, Robert J. Kinsey, Carl C. Liebe, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Joshua Lothringer, Utah Valley Univ. (United States); Luz Maria Martinez-Sierra, James McGuire, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Victoria Meadows, Univ. of Washington (United States); Ruth Murray-Clay, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States); Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Sarah Peacock, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Hilke Schlichting, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States); David Sing, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States); Kevin Stevenson, Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab., LLC (United States); Yen-Hung Wu, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
17 July 2022 • 09:00 - 09:20 EDT | Room 523
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UV-SCOPE is a mission concept to determine the causes of atmospheric mass loss in exoplanets, investigate the mechanisms driving aerosol formation in hot Jupiters, and study the influence of the stellar environment on atmospheric evolution and habitability. The observatory consists of a 60 cm telescope paired to a long-slit spectrograph, yielding almost continuous coverage between 1203 Å and 4000 Å, with resolutions 6000 - 240. A LiF prism serves as a dispersive element and provides high throughput. The use of two delta-doped Electron-Multiplying CCD detectors with UV-optimized, single-layer anti-reflection coatings provides high quantum efficiency and low detector noise. From the Earth-Sun second Lagrangian point, UV-SCOPE will continuously observe planetary transits and stellar variability in the full FUV-to-NUV range, with negligible astrophysical background. UV-SCOPE was proposed to NASA as a Medium Explorer (MidEx) mission for the 2021 Announcement of Opportunity.
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Author(s): Sagi Ben-Ami, Yossi Shvartzvald, Eli Waxman, Udi Netzer, Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel); Viktor M. Algranatti, Israel Space Agency (Israel); Avishay Gal-Yam, Ofer Lapid, Eran O. Ofek, Jeremy Topaz, Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel); Iair Arcavi, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Asif Arooj, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany); Shlomi Azaria, Eran Bahalul, Elbit Systems Ltd. (Israel); Merlin F. Barschke, Benjamin Bastian-Querner, David Berge, Vlad D. Berlea, Rolf Buehler, Louise Dittmar, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany); Anatoly Gelman, Elbit Systems Ltd. (Israel); Gianluca Giavitto, Juan M. Haces Crespo, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany); Daniel Heilbrunn, Arik Kachergincky, Elbit Systems Ltd. (Israel); Nirmal Kaipachery, Marek Kowalski, Shrinivasrao R. Kulkarni, Shashank Kumar, Daniel Küsters, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany); Yonit Miron-Salomon, Aharon Nir, Gadi Nitzan, Elbit Systems Ltd. (Israel); Sebastian Philipp, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany); Ilan Sagiv, Elbit Systems Ltd. (Israel); Julian Schliwinski, Nicola De Simone, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany); Nir Stern, Elbit Systems Ltd. (Israel); Mikhail Vasilev, Francesco Zappon, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany)
17 July 2022 • 09:20 - 09:40 EDT | Room 523
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The Ultraviolet Transient Astronomy Satellite (ULTRASAT) is a spaceborne near UV telescope with an unprecedentedly large field of view (200 squared degrees). The mission, led by the Weizmann Institute of Science and the Israel space agency in collaboration with DESY (Helmholtz foundation, Germany) and NASA (USA), is fully funded and expected to be launched to a geostationary orbit by early 2025. With a grasp 300 times larger than that of the most sensitive UV satellite to date, ULTRASAT will revolutionize our understanding of the hot transient universe, as well as of flaring galactic sources. We describe the mission payload, the optical design and the choice of materials allowing us to achieve a point spread function of ~10arcsec across the FoV. We detail the mitigation techniques implemented to suppress out-of-band emission and reduce stray light, detector properties including measured QE at operation temperature, and expected performance (limiting magnitude) for various objects.
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Author(s): Paul A. Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Richard Ignace, East Tennessee State Univ. (United States); Ken Gayley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Gopal Vasudevan, Lockheed Martin Corp. (United States); Robert Woodruff, Woodruff Consulting (United States); Coralie Neiner, Observatoire de Paris à Meudon (France); Scott Richardson, Alison Nordt, Lockheed Martin Corp. (United States); Tony Hull, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States); Shouleh Nikzad, Charles Shapiro, Jet Propulsion Lab., Caltech (United States)
17 July 2022 • 09:40 - 10:00 EDT | Room 523
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Polstar combines, for the first time, the complementary benefits of spectroscopy and polarimetry to probe the complex interface between massive stars and the interstellar medium. Furthermore, it leverages an innovative combination of effective area and time coverage, to reach the diversity of targets necessary to transform our understanding of the ecology of star and planet creation. Detailed knowledge of these bright, yet distant objects, is crucial for understanding the transformation of our galaxy, from the barren landscape of the early Big Bang, into the chemically enriched environment that produced the solar system we call home.
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Author(s): Sara R. Heap, Univ. of Maryland (United States); Anthony Hull, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States); Steven Kendrick, Kendrick Aerospace Consulting LLC (United States); Robert Woodruff, Woodruff Consulting (United States)
17 July 2022 • 10:00 - 10:20 EDT | Room 523
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Over the past 50 years, UV space telescopes have made major contributions to astrophysics, and UV spectrographs on Hubble are still in high demand. But given Hubble’s age (32 years and counting), continued access to the UV is by no means assured. Worse, there is no UV telescope in development or in NASA’s plans until 2045, when NASA’s large IR/Opt/UV telescope would be launched. Here, we present LUVIS, a 0.5m Lyman UV/ far-UV telescope that will provide a lifeline to astronomers for spectroscopic studies of a myriad of astronomic sources from transiting exoplanets experiencing photoevaporation to local analogues of high-z dwarf galaxies responsible for re-ionizing the universe. The spectral range of LUVIS is 1020-1400 Angstroms, a spectral region covering both the Hubble COS G140M and most of the FUSE/LiF spectral regions. The spectra have a resolving power of ~20,000. In this paper, we describe the basic scientific requirements of LUVIS and derived instrumental requirements.
Coffee Break 10:20 - 10:50
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Author(s): Walter M. Harris, Jason Corliss, Ricardo Maciel, Derek Gardner, Naomi Yescas, Daniel Truong, Elijah Garcia, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
17 July 2022 • 10:50 - 11:10 EDT | Room 523
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An all-reflective spatial heterodyne spectrometer (ARSHS) is a compact, high-resolving power/etendue interferometric instrument capable of providing high sensitivity measurements of emission line sources at far ultraviolet (FUV) wavelengths. In its basic configuration, an ARSHS consists of a diffraction grating and a set of pilot mirrors that are aligned to a target wavelength. A single alignment setting of an ARSHS samples a small (~1 nm) bandpass that is defined by resolving power and the detector format. This restricts the use of ARSHS to instruments targeting a single emission feature. To enable their more general use, we have developed broadly tunable ARSHS designs that sample a wider wavelength range through rotation of the pilot mirrors. Here, we provide results of laboratory testing of an ARSHS capable of sampling a factor of 2 in wavelength and a preliminary design for a mission-class FUV instrument that was proposed for the most recent Discovery program call.
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Author(s): Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Chris Martin, Caltech (United States); Erika Hamden, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); David Schiminovich, Columbia Univ. (United States); Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Jean Evrard, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Bruno Milliard, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France); David Valls-Gabaud, Observatoire de Paris (France); Aafaque Khan, Simran Agarwal, Haeun Chung, Jessica Li, Trenton Brendel, Carlos Vargas, Nicole Melso, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Zeren Lin, Marty Crabill, Drew Miles, Caltech (United States); Gillian Kyne, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Vincent Picouet, Ignacio Cevallos, Barbara C. Santiago, Columbia Univ. (United States); Philippe Balard, Patrick Blanchard, Didier Vibert, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France); Nicolas Bray, Catherine Hourtolle, Frédéri Mirc, Johan Montel, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Jared Termini, The Univ. of Iowa (United States)
17 July 2022 • 11:10 - 11:30 EDT | Room 523
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The Faint Intergalactic-medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBall-2, FB-2) is designed to discover and map faint emission from the cool-warm circumgalactic medium of low redshift galaxies. FIREBall-2 is the only ultraviolet (UV) telescope currently in operation that can tackle the Astro2020 Decadal Survey Panel's ambitious goal of “Mapping the Circumgalactic Medium and Intergalactic Medium in Emission.” FIREBall-2 tests and validates key technologies and science strategies for a future space mission to accomplish its ambitious science mission. The upcoming 2022 flight of FB-2 paves the way for validation of key technologies for NASA’s next Great Observatories, including delta-doped EMCCD UV detectors UV multi-object spectroscopy, and flight demonstration of the Roman/CGI EMCCD controller. In this proceeding, we discuss challenges overcome since FB-2's delayed 2020 flight, updates to FB-2's various systems, and progress made towards a 2022 flight.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 11:50 - 13:00
Session 2: UV II
17 July 2022 • 13:00 - 16:10 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Anna M. Moore, The Australian National Univ. (Australia)
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Author(s): Christian Kintziger, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium); David Berghmans, Royal Observatory of Belgium (Belgium); Valeria Büchel, Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos/World Radiation Ctr. (Switzerland); Samuel Gissot, Royal Observatory of Belgium (Belgium); Manfred Gyo, Margit Haberreiter, Louise Harra, Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos/World Radiation Ctr. (Switzerland); Lionel Jacques, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium); Silvio Koller, Patrik Langer, Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos/World Radiation Ctr. (Switzerland); Bao Long Levan, Benoît Marquet, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium); Daniel Pfiffner, Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos/World Radiation Ctr. (Switzerland); Matthew West, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Philippe Bouchez, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium)
17 July 2022 • 13:00 - 13:20 EDT | Room 523
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The Lagrange Mission shall position a satellite at the Lagrangian point L5 with the objective to perform continuous observations of the Sun and in particular, the space between the Earth and the Sun thereby providing measurement data for operational space weather services. The monitoring system is foreseen to substantially improve the accuracy of space weather forecasting and improve the reliability of event-based warnings and alerts to the end users when solar events take place. Within this frame, the Lagrange Extreme UltraViolet Coronal Imager (LUCI) instrument is under study to image the full solar corona. The Lagrange Mission has ended its Phase AB1 study to approach the BCD implementation Phase in early 2022. The LUCI instrument, currently under the Primeship of CSL with ROB and PMOD as partners until Phase B2, is undergoing technological predevelopments. The presentation will aim at introducing the instrument status as well as the main challenges that need to be solved.
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Author(s): N. Werner, J. Ripa, F. Munz, F. Hroch, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); M. Jelinek, Astronomical Institute (Czech Republic); J. Krticka, M. Zajaček, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); M. Topinka, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic), Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica (Italy); V. Dániel, J. Gromes, Czech Aerospace Research Ctr. (Czech Republic); J. Vaclavik, L. Steiger, V. Lédl, Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic); J. Benacek, Technical Univ. of Berlin (Germany); J. Budaj, Slovak Academy of Sciences (Slovakia); Nikola Faltova, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Rudolf Galis, Pavol Jozef Šafárik Univ. in Košice (Slovakia); Vladimir Karas, Astronomical Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences (Czech Republic); Matej Kosiba, Iva Krtickova, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Jiri Kubat, Brankica Kubatova, Astronomical Institute of the CAS (Czech Republic); Petr Kurfurst, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Andras Pal, Konkoly Observatory (Hungary); Christina Thone, Astronomical Institute of the CAS (Czech Republic)
17 July 2022 • 13:20 - 13:40 EDT | Room 523
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We present a proposal for a near-UV space telescope on a ~70kg micro-satellite with a moderately fast repointing capability and a near real-time alert communication system that has been proposed in response to a call for an ambitious Czech national mission. The mission, which has recently been approved for Phase 0, A, and B1 study shall measure the brightness evolution of kilonovae, resulting from mergers of neutron stars in the near-UV band and thus it shall distinguish between different explosion scenarios. Between the observations of transient sources, the satellite shall perform observations of other targets of interest, a large part of which will be chosen in open competition.
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Author(s): Robert A. Woodruff, Woodruff Consulting (United States); Coralie Neiner, Observatoire de Paris à Meudon (France); Roberto Casini, High Altitude Observatory (United States); Gopal Vasudevan, Advanced Technology Ctr., Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. (United States); Tony Hull, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States); Paul Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
17 July 2022 • 13:40 - 14:00 EDT | Room 523
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The Polstar NASA medium explorer (MIDEX) design configuration and implementation is strongly driven by the requirement to measure the state of polarization of stellar objects using a space-based sensor. Constraints include, but are not limited to, symmetry of geometry and coatings of the collecting aperture, angle of incidence at optical surfaces, coating uniformity, line of sight jitter and drift, orbit properties, thermal stability, and ground calibration. The Polstar MIDEX will observe scientifically interesting stars. Polstar will simultaneously measure all four Stokes parameters (I, Q, U, V)T to high accuracy and precision (~ 0.001 %) of the Stokes vector at high spectral resolving power. The 600-mm diameter aperture telescope images a selected star at the Entrance Slit of a spectrometer. Polstar offers two spectral channels within one spectrometer: a Far UV 122 nm to 200 nm Channel 1 with R~30K spectral resolving power and a low spectral resolution Channel 2 channel 122 to 320 nm
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Author(s): Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Carlos Miravet, Gonzalo Jose Taubmann, Laura Diez, Joan Manel Casalta, SENER Aeroespacial S.A. (Spain); Mikhail Sachkov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation); Juan Carlos Vallejo, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Leon Restrepo Quiros, Institución Univ. de Envigado (Colombia); Miguel Chaves, Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (Mexico); Shingo Kameda, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Ricardo Gil-Hutton, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Univ. Nacional de San Juan (Argentina)
17 July 2022 • 14:00 - 14:20 EDT | Room 523
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OUL is a wide field imager designed as a small, additional payload to be attached to the Luna 26 mission. The instrument has a field of view of 20◦ x 20◦ and provides images with angular resolution 3 arcmin in several far ultraviolet bands, including Lyman-α, He II at 164nm and several continuum bands. The imager is designed to monitor the Earth’s exosphere and the ecliptic (+/-20 deg) primary at Lyman-α and in the 125-140 nm and 145-170 nm bands. In this contribution, the optical design of the instrument, its mechanical layout and the science program to be implemented will be described.
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Author(s): Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, Ana de Isidro-Gomez, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Diego Gil Leyva, SENER Ingeniería y Sistemas S.A. (Spain); Francesca Bachiotti, INAF (Italy); Julia Leon, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain); Pol Ribes, European Space Agency (Spain); Joan Manel Casalta, Carlos Miravet, SENER Aeroespacial S.A. (Spain); Juan Carlos Vallejo, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Mikhail Sachkov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation); Ada Canet, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Boris Shustov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation); Raul de la Fuente, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Kevin France, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Lucas Patty, Univ. Bern (Switzerland); Stefano Benetti, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy); Asif ud-Doula, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
17 July 2022 • 14:20 - 14:40 EDT | Room 523
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The mission Ultraviolet Researcher to Investigate the Emergence of Life (URIEL) is designed to carry out low dispersion UV spectropolarimetry in the 140-400 nm spectral range to investigate the formation of planetary systems, its interaction with stellar winds and search for signatures of prebiotic molecules by remote sensing of small bodies in the Solar System (comets and meteorites) in near Earth orbit. URIEL is conceived as a 50cm primary telescope with a Ritchey-Chrétien mounting. The telescope is equipped with a single instrument, the UV spectropolarimeter, whose low dispersion will enable resolving the main spectral features whilst guaranteeing enough flux per resolution element for the Stokes parameters to be measured to an accuracy of 500 ppm, as required for remote detection of alanine. In this sense, URIEL is a pathfinder mission to the technology that will enable remote sensing of amino acids and addressing the source of the chirality imbalance in the Earth's bio-molecules.
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Author(s): Genevieve D. Vigil, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Nicolas Donders, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); Ken Kobayashi, Amy Winebarger, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Charles Kankelborg, Montana State Univ. (United States)
17 July 2022 • 14:40 - 15:00 EDT | Room 523
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FURST is a sounding rocket mission designed to acquire the first high quality, full-disk, UV Solar spectra in the range of 1200 - 1800 ̊A. The instrument uses a set of cylindrical optical elements, acting in place of a slit, to collect light from the entire solar disk in combination with a Rowland circle spectrometer, to generate high resolution spectra, ≥2 ×104λ/∆λ, without scanning a slit over the spatial extent of the Sun. The instrument requires absolute radiometric and spectral calibration before and after flight in order to analyze data products and meet science goals. We present an update on the portable calibration system designed to meet ambitious calibration requirements. The system consists of a vacuum chamber, a Pt hollow cathode lamp, collimating optics and NIST calibrated photodiodes. Absolute radiometric calibration of ≤15% and wavelength calibration corresponding to ±3km/s is expected.
Coffee Break 15:00 - 15:30
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Author(s): April D. Jewell, Ghazaleh Kafaie Shirmanesh, John Hennessy, Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
17 July 2022 • 15:30 - 15:50 EDT | Room 523
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JPL’s 2D-doped detectors exhibit nearly 100% internal QE (reflection-limited response) from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. Response is further optimized with AR coatings and bandpass filters, but there is no “one size fits all” coating/filter solution that spans the entire range. We have developed a catalog of coating/filter designs suitable for a variety of imaging applications. Spectroscopy applications often benefit from a spatially varying detector response optimized according to the instrument’s optical dispersion; this requires that different coatings be applied to different portions of the detector—similar to a linear variable filter. We have recently demonstrated detectors with a varying response profile with each portion of the device targeting a different bandpass. This advancement is achieved through the controllable patterning of AR coating(s) on 2D-doped arrays. Here we review our coatings work to date, including progress on variable response UV detectors.
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Author(s): Lauro Conti, Jürgen Barnstedt, Sebastian Diebold, Markus Höltzli, Christoph Kalkuhl, Norbert Kappelmann, Thomas Rauch, Thomas Schanz, Beate Stelzer, Klaus Werner, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Kevin Meyer, Daniel Schaadt, Technische Univ. Clausthal (Germany); Hans-Rudolf Elsener, EMPA (Switzerland)
17 July 2022 • 15:50 - 16:10 EDT | Room 523
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We present the current status of our imaging and photon counting UV-MCP detector, sensitive in the ultraviolet wavelength range. The detector has a spatial resolution of 2k pixels per axis, no readout noise and a very low dark rate, making it ideal for photometry and spectroscopy. The talk focuses on the results of assembling, integrating, and testing the detector version used for a stratospheric balloon mission. This is a proof-of-concept with the goal of finding variable hot stars and flaring M-dwarf stars. Furthermore, space missions with the Indian Institute of Astrophysics and Chinese Purple Mountain Observatory are in preparation.
Session 3: Solar
17 July 2022 • 16:10 - 17:10 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Kyriaki Minoglou, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
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Author(s): Lindsay Glesener, Demoz Gebre-Egziabher, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); John Sample, Montana State Univ. (United States); Amir Caspi, Southwest Research Institute (United States); David M. Smith, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States); William Setterberg, Ty Kozic, Mansour Savadogo, Christian Berger, Lestat Clemmer, Robert Drake, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Allan Faulkner, Montana State Univ. (United States); Annsley Greathouse, Kate Hildebrandt, Runsheng Ma, Mel Nightingale, Meredith Wieber, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Trevor Knuth, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Kyle Houser, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Rubin Meuchel, Larry Springer, Montana State Univ. (United States)
17 July 2022 • 16:10 - 16:30 EDT | Room 523
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In the past two decades, great advances have been made in investigating hard X-rays from accelerated electrons in solar flares. This emission is of interest because the means by which flares so efficiently accelerate particles are still not understood. Observations from the RHESSI spacecraft led to better understanding in the imaging and spectral domains, but presented difficulty for time domain analysis at scales less than ~2 seconds. This leaves the behavior of flare emission at small timescales poorly explored. The NSF-funded IMpulsive Phase Rapid Energetic Solar Spectrometer (IMPRESS) CubeSat is designed specifically to measure hard X-ray emission up to 100 keV from flares at a tens-of-ms cadence. This will provide novel constraints for flare particle acceleration models. IMPRESS is a student-centered collaboration between UMN, MSU, SwRI, and UCSC. This presentation will describe the science, mission concept, and some design specifics for IMPRESS.
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Author(s): Sergio Fabiani, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Ilaria Baffo, Univ. degli Studi della Tuscia (Italy); Sergio Bonomo, IMT S.r.l. (Italy); Gessica Contini, SCAI Connect S.r.l (Italy); Enrico Costa, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Giovanni Cucinella, IMT S.r.l. (Italy); Giovanni De Cesare, INAF-OAS Bologna (Italy); Ettore Del Monte, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Andrea Del Re, SCAI Connect S.r.l (Italy); Sergio Di Cosimo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Simone Di Filippo, IMT S.r.l. (Italy); Alessandro Di Marco, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Pierluigi Fanelli, Univ. degli Studi della Tuscia (Italy); Fabio La Monaca, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Alfredo Locarini, CIRI Aerospace, Univ. degli Studi di Bologna (Italy); Pasqualino Loffredo, Giovanni Lombardi, Gabriele Minervini, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Dario Modenini, CIRI Aerospace, Univ. degli Studi di Bologna (Italy); Fabio Muleri, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Andrea Negri, Massimo Perelli, IMT S.r.l. (Italy); John Rankin, Alda Rubini, Paolo Soffitta, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Paolo Tortora, CIRI Aerospace, Univ. degli Studi di Bologna (Italy)
17 July 2022 • 16:30 - 16:50 EDT | Room 523
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The CUbesat Solar Polarimeter (CUSP) is a project aimed to measure the linear polarization of hard X-rays (20-100 keV) of solar flares that involve magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration on the Sun. CUSP wants to find the correlation between the polarization of solar flares, Coronal Mass Emissions and Solar Energetic Particles events. CUSP was selected for a phase A study by the Italian Space Agency. CUSP comprises two identical CubeSats, at 180° of phase difference on the orbit, with a Compton X-ray polarimeter for a continuous Sun monitoring. CUSP will reach a minimum detectable polarization of a few “percents'' even for medium-class M flares. INAF-IAPS leads the project and will design the scientific payload in collaboration with SCAI Connect s.r.l.. The 6U CubeSat platform will be provided by IMT s.r.l.. The CIRI-AERO department of the University of Bologna will perform the Mission Analysis, while the Ground station will be provided by Tuscia University of Viterbo.
Sunday Plenary Session
17 July 2022 • 18:30 - 19:30 EDT | Room 517d
Join the Sunday Plenary Session, which will include talks on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.
Monday Plenary Session
18 July 2022 • 08:30 - 10:00 EDT | Room 517 d
Join the Monday Plenary Session, focused on the James Webb Space Telescope.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 - 10:30
Session 4: Athena I
18 July 2022 • 10:30 - 11:40 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Agency (Netherlands)
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Author(s): Jan-Willem den Herder, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Luigi Piro, INAF (Italy); Vincent Albouys, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Massimo Cappi, INAF (Italy)
18 July 2022 • 10:30 - 10:55 EDT | Room 523
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The Athena X-ray Integral Unit (X-IFU) is the high resolution X-ray spectrometer, studied since 2015 for flying in the mid-30s on the Athena space X-ray Observatory, a versatile observatory designed to address the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme, selected in November 2013 by the Survey Science Committee. Based on a large format array of Transition Edge Sensors (TES), it aims to provide spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy, with a spectral resolution of 2.5 eV (up to 7 keV) over an hexagonal field of view of 5 arc minutes (equivalent diameter). In this paper, after illustrating the breakthrough capabilities of the X-IFU, we describe the instrument as presented at its SRR (i.e. in the course of its preliminary definition phase, so-called B1). We then show the instrument budgets, and discuss on the ongoing key technology demonstration activities, the instrument calibration, the X-IFU Instrument Science Center and various Consortium related items.
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Author(s): Hervé Geoffray, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Brian Jackson, SRON (Netherlands); Simon Bandler, Stephen Smith, NASA (United States); William Doriese, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Malcom Durkin, NIST (United States); Jan van der Kuur, Bert-Joost van Leeuwen, SRON (Netherlands); Damien Prêle, APC (France); Laurent Ravera, Yann Parot, IRAP (France); Henk van Weers, Jan-Willem den Herder, SRON (Netherlands); Joseph Adams, James Chervenak, NASA (United States); Carl Reintsema, Joel Ullom, NIST (United States); Frank Brachet, Aurélien Ledot, Philippe Peille, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Didier Barret, IRAP (France)
18 July 2022 • 10:55 - 11:10 EDT | Room 523
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The X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) instrument is the high-resolution X-ray spectrometer of the ESA Athena X-ray Observatory. X-IFU will deliver spectra from 0.2 to 12 keV with a spectral resolution of 2.5 eV up to 7 keV from 5" pixels, with a hexagonal field of view of 5' equivalent diameter. The main sensor array and its associated detection chain is one of the major sub-systems of the X-IFU instrument, and is the main contributor to X-IFU’s performance. CNES (the French Space Agency) is leading the development of X-IFU; additional major partners are NASA-GFSC, SRON, VTT, APC, NIST, and IRAP. This paper updates the B-phase definition of the X-IFU detection chain. The readout is based on time-division multiplexing (TDM). The different sub-components of the detection chain (the main sensor array, the cold electronics stages, and the warm electronics) require global design optimization in order to achieve the best performance. The detection chain’s sensitivity to the EMI/EMC environme
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Author(s): Henk J. van Weers, Brian D. Jackson, Damian Audley, Dennis van Loon, Geert Keizer, Johannes P. C. Dercksen, Marcel A. M. van Litsenburg, Nathalie Q. S. Gorter, Rob Wolfs, Roland H. den Hartog, Sander van Loon, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, NWO-I (Netherlands)
18 July 2022 • 11:10 - 11:25 EDT | Room 523
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This paper describes the design progress of the X ray Integral Field Unit Focal Plane Assembly (X-IFU FPA) for the Athena X-ray observatory. Test results obtained from the Development Model (DM) program are compared to existing numerical models. From these comparisons input to the next FPA Engineering Model (EM) is derived. Measurements have been done to assess the magnetic shielding performance and key thermal properties are verified. A dedicated configuration is used to verify the changes in mechanical dynamic behavior between ambient temperature and after cool-down to assess micro-vibration susceptibility. We conclude with a summary and outlook for the FPA-EM design.
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Author(s): Tanguy Thibert, Lionel Jacques, Guilhem Terrasa, Etienne Lallemand, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium); Christian Kintziger, Ctr Spatial de Liège (Belgium)
18 July 2022 • 11:25 - 11:40 EDT | Room 523
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The Athena mission in general and the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) instrument in particular are designed to address a wealth of scientific questions related to the science theme of the Hot and Energetic Universe. X-IFU provides medium spatial resolution and high resolving power by means of a calorimetric detector. As the X-IFU detector needs to be operated at 50mK, the instrument is contained in a Dewar. The Aperture Cylinder consists of a set of structural/thermal elements that carry and position at correct distances from the detector surface the first three Dewar thermal filters, provide adequate thermal interfaces and protect the filters from contamination. The purpose of the presentation will consist in introducing the Phase A-B1 contribution of CSL to the XIFU consortium. This summarizes to the elaboration of a conceptual design for the Aperture Cylinder, and several demonstration models as a de-risking activity with the intent to increase the ApC TRL.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 11:40 - 13:00
Session 5: Athena II
18 July 2022 • 13:00 - 13:55 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Agency (Netherlands)
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Author(s): Kirpal Nandra, Arne Rau, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 13:00 - 13:25 EDT | Room 523
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The Athena Wide Field Imager (WFI) is a future instrument which is designed to offer breakthrough capabilities in wide field X-ray imaging spectroscopy. The science motivating the development of the instrument include uncovering typical supermassive black hole (SMBH) activity at z>6, performing a complete census of SMBH activity at z=1-4, pinpointing the hot gas occupying the most massive dark matter haloes at z>2; measuring the temperature and abundances of clusters of galaxies out to their virial radius and performing spectral-timing measurements of bright compact sources to determine the structure of the innermost accreting regions. Since the acceptance of the Athena into the ESA program, further exciting scientific opportunities for the WFI have also been identified. This paper will review the science drivers for the WFI in the light of the current development status of the instrument and the Athena mission.
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CANCELED: Thermal control of the Athena WFI Instrument
Author(s): Christian Beitler, Valeria Antonelli, Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 13:25 - 13:40 EDT | Room 523
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The Wide-Field Imager (WFI) instrument on the board the ATHENA X-ray observatory, planned to be launched in 2034, requires stringent thermal control for the operation of its Camera Head. The high-power dissipation together with the low operating temperature of the DePFET sensors leads to a complex system composed of custom design graphene thermal straps that surpass the current state-of-the-art thermal straps performance. To minimize radiator area two independent, thermally decoupled cooling chains are used for the cooling of the Camera Head. The cooling chain design and analysis are presented in this paper.
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Author(s): Diogo Coutinho, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 13:25 - 13:40 EDT | Room 523
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The Wide-Field Imager (WFI) on-board Athena spacecraft is being developed by a consortium of European institutes led by Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Garching. WFI will have its System Requirements Review (SRR). In parallel, the critical technology developments and necessary breadboarding activities leading to the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) are completed. This paper presents the challenges of WFI, its critical technology developments and the current status of the system design and development.
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Author(s): Maximilian Herrmann, Robert Andritschke, Michael Bonholzer, Günter Hauser, Mie S. Magelund, Johannes Müller-Seidlitz, Jonas Reiffers, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 13:40 - 13:55 EDT | Room 523
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The readout of DEPFET pixel detectors requires the differential transmission of analog signals within the spacecraft of the Athena mission. This exposes the successive multiplexed signals of neighboring pixels to electrical crosstalk which is due to limited bandwidth and has to be corrected during flight. We report on measurements utilizing the VERITAS readout ASIC, version 2.2, with different length of cablings and multiplexing time settings. These measurements are performed using optimized operational parameters either with an X-ray calibration source or test pulses on single channels. The spectral performance, concerning homogeneity and resolution, will be investigated with an emphasis on crosstalk and its correction.
Session 6: Athena Optics
18 July 2022 • 13:55 - 16:30 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: William W. Zhang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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Author(s): Marcos Bavdaz, Eric Wille, Mark Ayre, Ivo Ferreira, Brian Shortt, Sebastiaan Fransen, Mark Millinger, European Space Agency (Netherlands); Maximilien Collon, Giuseppe Vacanti, Nicolas Barrière, Boris Landgraf, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Mark Olde Riekerink, Jeroen Haneveld, Ronald Start, Micronit B.V. (Netherlands); Coen van Baren, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Desiree Della Monica Ferreira, Sonny Massahi, Sara Svendsen, Finn Christensen, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Michael Krumrey, Evelyn Handick, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany); Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Giovanni Pareschi, Bianca Salmaso, Alberto Moretti, Daniele Spiga, INAF (Italy); Giuseppe Valsecchi, Dervis Vernani, Media Lario S.r.l. (Italy); Paul Lupton, William Mundon, Gavin Phillips, Teledyne e2v UK Ltd. (United Kingdom); Jakob Schneider, Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoff- und Strahltechnik IWS (Germany); Tapio Korhonen, Opteon Oy (Finland); Alejandro Sanchez, Dominique Heinis, Carles Colldelram, ALBA Synchrotron (Spain); Massimiliano Tordi, Simone De Lorenzi, EIE S.r.l. (Italy); Richard Willingale, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom)
18 July 2022 • 13:55 - 14:20 EDT | Room 523
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The next generation X-ray observatory ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics) requires an optics with unprecedented performance. It is the combination of low mass, large effective area and good angular resolution that is the challenge of the ATHENA X-ray optics. The Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) is the mission enabler being specifically developed for ATHENA, in a joint effort by industry, research institutions and ESA. All aspects of the optics are being addressed, from the mirror plates and their coatings, over the mirror modules and their assembly into the ATHENA telescope, to the facilities required to build and test the flight optics, demonstrating performance, robustness and programmatic compliance. The SPO technology is currently being matured to the level required for the adoption of the ATHENA mission, i.e. the start of the mission implementation phase. The paper will provide an overview of the ongoing activities and status of the ATHENA optics developments.
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Author(s): Maximilien J. Collon, Luis Abalo, Nicolas M. Barrière, Alex Bayerle, Luigi Castiglione, Noë Eenkhoorn, David Girou, Ramses Günther, Enrico Hauser, Roy van der Hoeven, Jasper den Hollander, Yvette Jenkins, Boris Landgraf, Laurens Keek, Ben Okma, Paulo da Silva Ribeiro, Aniket Thete, Sjoerd Verhoeckx, Mark Vervest, Roel Visser, Luc Voruz, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Marcos Bavdaz, Eric Wille, Ivo Ferreira, European Space Research and Technology Ctr., European Space Agency (Netherlands); Mark Olde Riekerink, Jeroen Haneveld, Arenda Koelewijn, Maurice Wijnperle, Jan-Joost Lankwarden, Bart Schurink, Ronald Start, Micronit B.V. (Netherlands); Coen van Baren, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Evelyn Handick, Michael Krumrey, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany); Sonny Massahi, Desiree Della Monica Ferreira, Sara Svendsen, Finn E. Christensen, DTU Space (Denmark); William Mundon, Gavin Phillips, Teledyne e2v UK Ltd. (United Kingdom); Giuseppe Vacanti, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands)
18 July 2022 • 14:20 - 14:45 EDT | Room 523
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Athena is the European Space Agency’s next flagship telescope, scheduled for launch in the 2030s. Its 2.5-m diameter mirror will be segmented and comprise more than 600 individual Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) grazing-angle imagers, called mirror modules. Arranged in concentric annuli and following a Wolter-Schwartzschild design, the mirror modules are made of several tens of primary-secondary mirror pairs, each mirror made of silicon, coated to increase the collective area of the system, and shaped to bring the incoming photons to a common focus 12 m away. The mission aims to deliver a half energy width of 5” and an effective area of about 1.4 m2 at 1 keV. Ahead of important programmatic milestones for Athena, we present the status of the technology, and illustrate not only recent X-ray results but also the progress made on the environmental testing, manufacturing and assembly aspects of the technology.
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Author(s): Giuseppe Valsecchi, Dervis Vernani, Fabio Marioni, Fabio Zocchi, Giovanni Bianucci, Media Lario S.r.l. (Italy); Marcos Bavdaz, Ivo Ferreira, European Space Research and Technology Ctr., European Space Agency (Netherlands); Giovanni Pareschi, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Tapio Korhonen, Mikko Pasanen, Opteon Oy (Finland)
18 July 2022 • 14:45 - 15:00 EDT | Room 523
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Several hundreds of Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) mirror modules will be integrated and co-aligned onto the ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High-ENergy Astrophysics) Mirror Assembly Module (MAM). The selected integration process, developed by Media Lario, exploits a full-size optical bench to capture the focal plane image of each mirror module when illuminated by a collimated UV wavefront at 218 nm. Each mirror module, handled by a manipulator, focuses the collimated beam onto a CCD camera placed at the 12 m focal position of the ATHENA telescope. The image is processed in real time to calculate the centroid position and overlap it to the centroid of the already integrated Mirror modules. The 600 mirror modules must be accurately aligned on the ATHENA optical bench, with tolerances of few micrometers and arcseconds. This Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) facility, able to host the complete ATHENA telescope is already becoming a reality.
Coffee Break 15:00 - 15:30
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Author(s): Bianca Salmaso, Stefano Basso, Mauro Ghigo, Daniele Spiga, Gabriele Vecchi, Giorgia Sironi, Vincenzo Cotroneo, Paolo Conconi, Edoardo Redaelli, Andrea Bianco, Giovanni Pareschi, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, Davide Sisana, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Carlo Pelliciari, Istituto d'Istruzione Superiore Bachelet (Italy); Mauro Fiorini, Salvatore Incorvaia, Michela Uslenghi, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Lorenzo Paoletti, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy); Claudio Ferrari, Andrea Zappettini, Istituto dei Materiali per l'Elettronica ed il Magnetismo, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy); Manuel Sanchez del Rio, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (France); Giancarlo Parodi, BCV Progetti S.r.l. (Italy); Vadim Burwitz, Surangkhana Rukdee, Gisela Hartner, Thomas Müller, Thomas Schmidt, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Andreas Langmeier, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Desiree Della Monica Ferreira, Sonny Massahi, Nis Christian Gellert, Finn Christensen, DTU Space (Denmark); Marcos Bavdaz, Ivo Ferreira, European Space Research and Technology Ctr., European Space Agency (Netherlands); Max Collon, Giuseppe Vacanti, Nicolas M. Barriere, cosine (Netherlands)
18 July 2022 • 15:30 - 15:45 EDT | Room 523
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The BEaTriX (Beam Expander Testing X-ray) facility is operative at the INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico Brera (Merate, Italy) for the X-ray acceptance tests (PSF and Aeff) of the ATHENA Silicon Pore Optics Mirror Modules (MM). The unique setup creates a parallel, monochromatic, large X-ray beam, that fully covers the entrance pupil of the MMs. This paper reports the commissioning of the 4.5 keV beam line, with special attention to the results on a reference Mirror Module, calibrated in other X-ray facilities.
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Author(s): Wayne H. Baumgartner, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Kristin Madsen, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Jeff Kegley, Ernest Wright, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Jim Tucker, Gregory Daspit, Southern Research (United States); Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Elias Breunig, Breunig Aerospace (Germany); Nicholas Thomas, Steven Johnson, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
18 July 2022 • 15:45 - 16:00 EDT | Room 523
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The X-ray and Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the baselined facility for X-ray testing of the Athena X-ray optics. Here we give an overview of the planned testing, including the XRCF facility and its 500-meter X-ray beamline, the required facility X-ray sources and detectors, testing requirements, and the GSE required for X-ray testing and calibration of the Athena mirror assembly module demonstrator (MAMD), the qualification model mirror (QM), and the flight model mirror (FM). Of special interest is the metrology system needed for the calibration: because the large Athena optic (the Mirror Assembly Module, or MAM) is too large for full illumination in the XRCF 1.5m diameter X-ray beam, the six sectors of the MAM will be tested separately, requiring precise knowledge of the optic and detector positions during the calibration to enable the stitching together of the full MAM point spread function from measurements of the individual sectors.
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Author(s): Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Giuseppe Vacanti, Maximilien J. Collon, Nicolas Barrière, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Marcos Bavdaz, Ivo Ferreira, Mark Ayre, European Space Agency (Netherlands); Josef Eder, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Elias Breunig, Breunig Aerospace (Germany); Gisela Hartner, Andreas Langmeier, Thomas Müller, Surangkhana Rukdee, Thomas Schmidt, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 16:00 - 16:15 EDT | Room 523
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Currently development Silicon Pore Optic (SPO) mirror modules are being produced for ESAs ATHENA mission. The optics will be tested at MPEs PANTER X-ray test facility. One set of modules will be used to verify the improved SPO optical performance i.e. the half energy width of the image point spread function (PSF) as well as the effective area of the optic. A second set of SPOs will be integrated into two full scale 1/6th demonstrator sectors of the final ATHENA 2.6-m diameter mirror assembly structure to quantify/verify the impact of thermal gradients on the PSF. Both Airbus and Thales will each provide a demonstrator sector for the thermo - X-ray optical tests. PANTER is also involved in the development, testing, and fabrication of the MGSE to support the 2.6-m diameter ATHENA mirror during the planned X-ray tests at XRCF. A description of the PANTER tests and results will be presented in this paper together with a short overview of the mirror assembly structure MGSE for XRCF.
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Author(s): Sara Svendsen, Sonny Massahi, Desiree Ferreira, Nis Gellert, Arne 'S Jegers, Finn Christensen, DTU Space (Denmark); Aniket Thete, Boris Landgraf, Max Collon, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Evelyn Handick, Levent Cibik, Christian Gollwitzer, Michael Krumrey, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany); Ivo Ferreira, Brian Shortt, Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Research and Technology Ctr., European Space Agency (Netherlands)
18 July 2022 • 16:15 - 16:30 EDT | Room 523
Tuesday Plenary Session
19 July 2022 • 08:30 - 10:00 EDT | Room 517 d
Join the Tuesday Plenary Session, which will include talks on eRosita and NASA's exoplanet archive.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 - 10:30
Session 7: Optics I
19 July 2022 • 10:30 - 12:10 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Desiree Della Monica Ferreira, DTU Space (Denmark)
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Author(s): William W. Zhang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
19 July 2022 • 10:30 - 10:50 EDT | Room 523
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This paper is an overview of the Next Generation X-ray Optics effort at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. The objective of the NGXO effort is to develop and mature an X-ray mirror technology that is capable of building and delivering a mirror assembly for flagship missions like Lynx and Probe missions like AXIS, which have been recommended by Astro2020 for implementation in the coming decade(s). The NGXO work encompasses all elements that compose a complete process to design, build, test, and deliver a complete mirror assembly, including optical design, mirror segment fabrication, coating, alignment and bonding to make mirror modules, integration of mirror modules into meta-shells, and integration of meta-shells into a mirror assembly. In addition, the NGXO team also adopts the latest mass-production techniques to ensure that building such a mirror assembly can also meet programmatic, such as schedule and cost, requirements of future missions like Lynx and AXIS.
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Author(s): Raul E. Riveros, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Kim D. Allgood, KBR, Inc. (United States); Michael P. Biskach, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Tabatha A. DeVita, Michal Hlinka, John D. Kearney, Ai Numata, KBR, Inc. (United States); William W. Zhang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
19 July 2022 • 10:50 - 11:10 EDT | Room 523
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Author(s): Marta Maria Civitani, Stefano Basso, Vincenzo Cotroneo, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Manfred Demmer, LT Ultra Precision Technology GmbH (Germany); Mauro Ghigo, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Salvatore Incorvaia, INAF - IASF Milano (Italy); Luigi Lessio, INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy); Giovanni Pareschi, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Giancarlo Parodi, BCV Progetti S.r.l. (Italy); Edoardo Redaelli, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Simon Schuler, LT Ultra-Precision Technology GmbH (Germany); Daniele Spiga, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Giorgio Toso, INAF - IASF Milano (Italy); Gabriele Vecchi, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
19 July 2022 • 11:10 - 11:30 EDT | Room 523
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The traditional solution foreseen for the realization of very large x-ray mirror modules (diameters above 1 m) is the partition of the optics in azimuthal and radial modules (like Silicon Pore Optics in Athena). Even if this approach solves the initial problem of the procurement and the handling of very large substrates, it moves the difficulties in the second phase, when thousands of segments have to be assembled without degrading their optical performances. On the contrary, a simpler large mirror module design could correspond to less than a few hundred thin monolithic shells. As an example, the complete opto-mechanical design, compliant with the Lynx mass budget and based on fused silica, foresees that the shell thickness ranges between 2 and 4 mm (for mirror shells between 0.4 and 3 m diameter). A technology development roadmap for this approach is funded in Italy by ASI and pursued out by INAF-OAB. In this paper we present the advancements obtained in the ion beam figuring tests,
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Author(s): Suzanne Romaine, JaeSub Hong, Martin Elvis, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
19 July 2022 • 11:30 - 11:50 EDT | Room 523
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Versatile Optics for X-ray Imaging (VOXI) is a technology that enables a wide range of missions and opens up new opportunities for scientific research over multiple disciplines including fundamental physics, heliophysics, astrophysics, planetary science, and laboratory physics. VOXI is well-suited to SmallSats, which have become powerful platforms from which to conduct leading scientific investigations and cutting-edge technology developments at low cost with rapid turn-arounds. At Center for Astrophysics | Harvard and Smithsonian, in collaboration with other institutions, we have developed VOXI, a Wolter-I X-ray telescope with a focal length of < 1.5 m, suitable for SmallSats. In this paper we describe the potential of these optics, and the applications for VOXI optics considered to date. Keywords: X-ray Optics, grazing incidence optics, Wolter optics, SmallSats
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Author(s): Ikuyuki Mitsuishi, Ayumu Takigawa, Koki Sakuta, Kazuki Ampuku, Kumiko Okada, Keitoku Yoshihira, Tetsuo Kanoh, Naoki Ishida, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Keisuke Tamura, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Univ. of Maryland (United States); Kikuko Miyata, Meijo Univ. (Japan); Gota Yamaguchi, Akinari Ito, Yoko Takeo, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Takehiro Kume, Yusuke Matsuzawa, Takahiro Saito, Kentarou Hiraguri, Hirokazu Hashizume, Natsume Optical Corp. (Japan); Hidekazu Mimura, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
19 July 2022 • 11:50 - 12:10 EDT | Room 523
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We have been developing X-ray optics for FOXSI-4 which is a part of a flare campaign to constrain flare acceleration mechanisms. We fabricated a full-shell Ni mirror and conducted X-ray irradiation tests at 15 keV. We obtained a focused image with an angular resolution of ~16 arcsec in HPD. The angular resolution degradation is mainly caused by a figure error of the mandrel. A basic designing and a prototype fabrication of the mirror housing were completed and there is no significant degradation in the optical imaging performance in FWHM after the random vibration test with a level of 12 Grms.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 12:10 - 13:30
Session 8: Optics II
19 July 2022 • 13:30 - 15:10 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Jessica A. Gaskin, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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Author(s): Mark L. Schattenburg, Youwei Yao, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Anjelica Molnar-Fenton, Izentis LLC (United States); Ralf Heilmann, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Alexander Bruccoleri, Izentis LLC (United States)
19 July 2022 • 13:30 - 13:50 EDT | Room 523
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Epoxy has been the preferred agent for x-ray telescope alignment and bonding for many decades. While it may have worked great for thick, stiff Chandra mirrors, its efficacy for thin shell mirrors has proven to be inadequate. We report results of recent experiments with alignment and bonding of silicon x-ray mirrors using silicate bonding sol gel solutions loaded with nanometer-size silica balls—so-called nanosilicate bonds. Strong bonds are obtained even though surfaces were not particularly flat. In this presentation we will show the latest results of bond shear-strength measurements using an Instron industrial tester, and results of preliminary three-point bonds on test mirrors, which mimics the bonding procedure now being used by the Goddard x-ray mirror group. We will also show results of bond line shrinkage experiments and compare to epoxy.
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Author(s): Ralf K. Heilmann, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Alexander Bruccoleri, Izentis LLC (United States); Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Peter Cheimets, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States); Casey DeRoo, University of Iowa (United States); Alan Garner, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Eric Gullikson, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (United States); Hans M. Guenther, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Gisela Hartner, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Ed Hertz, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States); Andreas Langmeier, Thomas Mueller, Surangkhana Rukdee, Thomas Schmidt, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Randall Smith, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States); Mark Schattenburg, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States)
19 July 2022 • 13:50 - 14:10 EDT | Room 523
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CAT gratings are an enabling technology for the Arcus grating Explorer mission, which addresses high-priority science goals from Astro2020. We report x-ray results from quasi-fully illuminated, co-aligned CAT gratings showing record-high R ~ 1.3x10^4 in 18th order at Al-K, and diffraction efficiency of blazed orders in agreement with pencil beam synchrotron measurements and model predictions at O-K. Tilt of the deep-etched, freestanding grating bars relative to the grating surface is measured and successfully compensated through angular alignment during bonding of the Si gratings to metal frames. We will also give updates on grating fabrication process improvements.
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Author(s): Vincenzo Cotroneo, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Giacomo Rivolta, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Marcos Bavdaz, ESTEC, European Space Agency (Netherlands); Ricardo Bruni, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Marta M. Civitani, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Thorsten Döhring, Technische Hochschule Aschaffenburg (Germany); Ivo Ferreira, ESTEC (Netherlands); Eugenio Gibertini, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Angelo Giglia, IOM CNR (Italy); Christian Gollwitzer, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) (Germany); Simone Iovenitti, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Luca Magagnin, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Giovanni Pareschi, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Suzanne Romaine, Leandra Sethares, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Brian Shortt, ESTEC (Netherlands); Giorgia Sironi, Daniele Spiga, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Giuseppe Valsecchi, Media Lario S.r.l. (Italy)
19 July 2022 • 14:10 - 14:30 EDT | Room 523
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It is well known that sputtered low-density coatings (e.g. carbon or B4C), when applied on top of high-density metallic coatings, can enhance the reflectivity in the softer X-ray band (below 4 keV). In the last years, we experimented with novel carbonated coatings, obtained by dip-liquid deposition, finding that dopamine is an optimal candidate for the application to future telescopes, like ATHENA (ESA), Lynx (NASA) and eXTP (CAS). We present the first X-ray measurements showing the effect of these coatings on conventional mirrors made of different materials (Au, Ir, Cr).
12181-45
Author(s): Matthew Beasley, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Randall McEntaffer, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Nathaniel Cunningham, Nebraska Wesleyan Univ. (United States)
19 July 2022 • 14:30 - 14:50 EDT | Room 523
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We have developed the capability to optimize a diffraction grating with arbitrary groove density and direction as a function of location. The added degrees of freedom allow additional correction of optical aberrations beyond what is available to holographic recordings. Since the groove direction and density can be independent for all points on the grating, the design is not constrained by the limitations of ensuring that the grooves follow a single parametrized function. The grooves are then written with e-beam fabrication techniques onto a silicon substrate. We present the results from our project to fabricate aberration-correcting gratings using direct writing in silicon. Two gratings were produced as part of this work, one is a demonstration a Fresnel plate to verify that the grating was fabricated as intended. The second grating was designed as part of a Raman spectrograph and provides excellent optical performance over the designed passband.
12181-46
Author(s): Fabien Grisé, Randall McEntaffer, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Brian Fleming, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Casey DeRoo, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Nick Kruczek, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Drew Miles, Caltech (United States); Kevin France, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States); Jake McCoy, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Cecilia Fasano, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Stephan McCandliss, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States); Chad Eichfeld, Michael Labella, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Mackenzie Carlson, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
19 July 2022 • 14:50 - 15:10 EDT | Room 523
Break
Coffee Break 15:10 - 15:40
Session 9: Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma and IXPE
19 July 2022 • 15:40 - 16:30 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Kirpal Nandra, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
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Author(s): Michael J. Freyberg, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Christopher Tenzer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
19 July 2022 • 15:40 - 15:55 EDT | Room 523
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The X-ray astronomical observatory eROSITA aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite is operational in a halo orbit around the Sun-Earth L2 point since summer 2019. In December 2021 it has completed its 4th (of total planned 8) all-sky survey. During this period eROSITA was hit by several solar coronal mass ejections and energetic particles from solar flares. Moreover, several events most likely caused by micrometeroid hits resulted in bright pixels and column segments. Finally, understanding and calibration of background features has improved during the mission. We give an update on statistics, instrumental response, and mitigation of these space environments effects.
12181-49
Author(s): A. Di Marco, F. Muleri, S. Fabiani, F. La Monaca, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); J. Rankin, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy), Univ. di Roma Sapienza (Italy), Univ. di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); P. Soffitta, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); L. Baldini, Univ. di Pisa (Italy), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); E. Costa, E. Del Monte, R. Ferrazzoli, C. Lefevre, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); L. Maiolo, F. Maita, CNR-IMM (Italy); A. Manfreda, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); A. Morbidini, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); S. L. O'Dell, B. D. Ramsey, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); A. Ratheesh, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); C. Sgro', Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); A. Trois, INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari (Italy); A. F. Tennant, M. C. Weisskopf, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
19 July 2022 • 15:55 - 16:10 EDT | Room 523
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The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) was launched on December 9, 2021, from Cape Canaveral into a low-Earth equatorial orbit. The mission, led by NASA in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency (ASI), features three identical telescopes, each with an imaging X-ray photoelectric polarimeter at the focus of an X-ray mirror assembly. Each focal-plane detector includes a set of 4 calibration sources powered by a 55Fe nuclide to monitor the detector's performance. Of these sources, one produces polarized X-rays at two energies and the remaining three generate unpolarized radiation. Here we present the status of this monitoring program, starting from installation of the flight nuclides before on-ground environmental testing of the observatory through recent on-orbit measurements during science operations.
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Author(s): Fabio La Monaca, Fei Xie, Paolo Soffitta, Enrico Costa, Alessandro Di Marco, Sergio Fabiani, Fabio Muleri, John Rankin, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Luca Baldini, Univ. di Pisa (Italy); Ettore Del Monte, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Alberto Manfreda, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Stephen L. O'Dell, Brian D. Ramsey, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Carmelo Sgrò, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Allyn F. Tennant, Martin C. Weisskopf, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
19 July 2022 • 16:10 - 16:30 EDT | Room 523
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The new NASA-ASI Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) adds polarization to the traditionally measured properties (position, energy, and time) of X-ray photons. While IXPE is optimized for the 2–8 keV band, we here use calibration data and simulations to investigate potential benefits of extending the energy range to lower and to higher energies. An extended energy band may be interesting for sources emitting strongly just below 2 keV or just above 8 keV, such as blazars, isolated neutron stars, or X-ray binaries.
Wednesday Plenary Session
20 July 2022 • 08:30 - 10:00 EDT | Room 517 d
Join the Wednesday Plenary Session, which will include a panel discussion about the Astro2020 Decadal Report.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 - 10:30
Session 10: Transient and Small Satellites I
20 July 2022 • 10:30 - 12:00 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Marta Maria Civitani, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
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Author(s): Ross C. McCurdy, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Drew Miles, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States), Caltech (United States); James Tutt, Tyler Anderson, Katherine Brooks, Fabien Grisé, Gabrielle Hernandez, Christopher Hillman, Keir Hunter, Bridget O'Meara, Nestor Pelaez, Vincent Smedile, Daniel Washington, Randall McEntaffer, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
20 July 2022 • 10:30 - 10:50 EDT | Room 523
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Author(s): Fabrizio Fiore, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste (Italy); Norbert Werner, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Ehud Behar, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology (Israel); Michèle Lavagna, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Michele Trenti, The Univ. of Melbourne (Australia)
20 July 2022 • 10:50 - 11:05 EDT | Room 523
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While the GW/GRB170817 event hinted at the enormous potential of the multi-messenger astrophysics, it remained, so far, unique. The situation will change in the next few years when Advanced LIGO/VIRGO and KAGRA will reach their nominal sensitivity. In the electromagnetic domain the Vera C. Rubin Observatory will soon revolutionize the investigation of transient sources in the optical band. An efficient X-ray all-sky monitor with good localisation capabilities will thus have a pivotal role in providing the high-energy counterparts of the GW interferometers and Rubin Observatory sources. To gain the required precision in localisation for unpredictable events in time and space requires a sensor distribution covering the full sky. We discuss the potential and the programmatic implications of large-scale -small platform distributed architectures based on the Camelot/GRBAlpha, HERMES pathfinder, SpIRIT and GALI technologic precursors, to build such a sensitive X-ray all-sky monitor.
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Author(s): Yuri Evangelista, Marco Feroci, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Fabrizio Fiore, INAF OATS (Italy); Riccardo Campana, INAF-OAS (Italy), INFN Bologna (Italy); Francesco Ceraudo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Giovanni Della Casa, Università di Udine (Italy); Evgeny Demenev, FBK (Italy); Giuseppe Dilillo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Mauro Fiorini, INAF IASF Milano (Italy); Marco Grassi, Università di Pavia (Italy); Alejandro Guzman, Paul Hedderman, IAAT University of Tübingen (Germany); Ezequiel J. Marchesini, Gianluca Morgante, INAF-OAS (Italy); Filippo Mele, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Paolo Nogara, INAF IASF Palermo (Italy); Samuel Pliego Caballero, IAAT University of Tübingen (Germany); Irina Rashevskaya, TIFPA-INFN (Italy); Francesco Russo, Giuseppe Sottile, INAF IASF Palermo (Italy); Claudio Labanti, Giulia Baroni, INAF-OAS (Italy); Pierluigi Bellutti, FBK (Italy); Giuseppe Bertuccio, Irisa Dedolli, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Fabio Fuschino, INAF-OAS (Italy); Massimo Gandola, Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Italy); Francesco Ficorella, FBK (Italy); Piero Malcovati, Università di Pavia (Italy); Antonino Picciotto, FBK (Italy); Alexandre Rachevski, INFN Trieste (Italy); Andrea Santangelo, Christoph Tenzer, IAAT University of Tübingen (Germany); Andrea Vacchi, Università di Udine (Italy); Gianluigi Zampa, INFN Trieste (Italy); Nicola Zampa, Università di Udine (Italy); Nicola Zorzi, FBK (Italy); Tianxiang Chen, Na Gao, Yupeng Xu, Lingjun Wang, Jiewei Cao, IHEP (China)
20 July 2022 • 11:05 - 11:20 EDT | Room 523
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HERMES is a space-borne mission based on a constellation of nano-satellites flying in a low-Earth orbit (LEO). The six 3U CubeSat host new miniaturized instruments with a hybrid Silicon Drift Detector/GAGG:Ce scintillator photodetector system sensitive to X-rays and gamma-rays. HERMES will probe the temporal emission of high-energy transients such as GRBs, ensuring a fast, arcmin-level localization in a field of view of several steradians. With a foreseen launch date in 2023, HERMES transient monitoring represents a keystone capability to complement the next generation of GW experiments. Moreover, the HERMES constellation will operate in conjunction with the SpIRIT 6U CubeSat, to be launched in early 2023. SpIRIT is an Australian-Italian mission for high-energy astrophysics that will carry in a SSO orbit an actively cooled HERMES detector system payload. On behalf of the HERMES collaboration, in this paper we will illustrate the HERMES and SpIRIT payload design, integration and tests.
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Author(s): Olivier Godet, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France)
20 July 2022 • 11:20 - 11:40 EDT | Room 523
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The new era of multi-messenger astronomy will likely deeply transform our understanding of the Universe contents in forthcoming years. Finding electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave events however appears to be one of the greatest challenges in modern astronomy. The coincidental and prompt detection of high-energy counterparts by nailing in a more accurate way than GW detectors where to look could ease such searches. The deployment of a high-energy & all-sky transient sky monitor with enough sensitivity could then be a solution. Such monitoring could be efficiently made by a swarm of LEO cubesats each embarking a modest effective area detector, but acting as a whole as a large and sensitive instrument. This is what we ambition to do with the cubesat project 3U Transat born at IRAP (France). Here, we will outline the main science drivers of the project, the constellation configuration, the project status as well as its expected performances.
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Author(s): Daisuke Yonetoku, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Akihiro Doi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Tatehiro Mihara, RIKEN (Japan); Takanori Sakamoto, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Makoto Arimoto, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Kohji Tsumura, Tokyo City Univ. (Japan); Tatsuya Sawano, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Shuichi Gunji, Yamagata Univ. (Japan)
20 July 2022 • 11:40 - 12:00 EDT | Room 523
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HiZ-GUNDAM is a candidate of future satellite mission for the Japanese competitive M-class mission by ISAS/JAXA to progress a time-domain astronomy and multi-messenger astronomy with gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomena. The science goals are (1) to probe the early universe with high redshift GRBs at z > 7, and (2) to promote the gravitational wave astronomy with short GRB. HiZ-GUNDAM has been successfully passed a review for pre-project candidate in November 2021, and its team is working on the concept study. We will introduce the sciences and mission overview of HiZ-GUNDAM.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 12:00 - 14:00
Session 11: Transient and Small Satellites II
20 July 2022 • 14:00 - 15:40 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
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Author(s): Jakub Rípa, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); András Pál, Konkoly Observatory (Hungary); Masanori Ohno, Eötvös Loránd Univ. (Hungary); Norbert Werner, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); László Mészáros, Balázs Csák, Konkoly Observatory (Hungary); Marianna Dafcikova, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Vladimír Dániel, Juraj Dudáš, Czech Aerospace Research Ctr. (Czech Republic); Marcel Frajt, Spacemanic s.r.o. (Czech Republic); Peter Hanák, Technical Univ. of Košice (Slovakia); Ján Hudec, Spacemanic s.r.o. (Czech Republic); Milan Junas, Czech Aerospace Research Ctr. (Czech Republic); Jakub Kapus, Spacemanic s.r.o. (Czech Republic); Miroslav Kasal, Brno Univ. of Technology (Czech Republic); Martin Koleda, Robert Laszlo, Needronix s.r.o. (Slovakia); Pavol Lipovsky, Technical Univ. of Košice (Slovakia); Filip Münz, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Maksim Rezenov, Spacemanic s.r.o. (Czech Republic); Miroslav Šmelko, Technical Univ. of Košice (Slovakia); Petr Svoboda, Czech Aerospace Research Ctr. (Czech Republic); Hiromitsu Takahashi, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Martin Topinka, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Tomáš Urbanec, Brno Univ. of Technology (Czech Republic); Jean-Paul Breuer, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Teruaki Enoto, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Zsolt Frei, Eötvös Loránd Univ. (Hungary); Yasushi Fukazawa, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Gábor Galgóczi, Wigner Research Ctr. for Physics (Hungary); Filip Hroch, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Yuto Ichinohe, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); László Kiss, Konkoly Observatory (Hungary); Hiroto Matake, Tsunefumi Mizuno, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Hirokazu Odaka, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Helen Poon, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Nagomi Uchida, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yuusuke Uchida, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)
20 July 2022 • 14:00 - 14:20 EDT | Room 523
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We will present the detector performance and early science results from GRBAlpha, a 1U CubeSat mission, which is a technological pathfinder to a future constellation of nanosatellites monitoring gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GRBAlpha was launched in March 2021 and operates on a 550km altitude sun-synchronous orbit. GRBAlpha has already detected several, both long and short, GRBs and was even able to detect two GRBs within 8 hours, proving that nanosatellites can be used for routine detection of gamma-ray transients. More then a year after launch, the detector performance is good and the degradation of the SiPM photon counters remains at an acceptable level. The same detector system, but double in size, was launched in January 2022 on VZLUSAT-2 (3U CubeSat). It performs well and already detected three GRBs and two solar flares. Here, we present early results from this mission as well.
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Author(s): László Mészáros, András Pál, Konkoly Observatory (Hungary); Norbert Werner, Jakub Rípa, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Masanori Ohno, Eötvös Loránd Univ. (Hungary); Balázs Csák, Konkoly Observatory (Hungary); Jakub Kapus, Marcel Frajt, Jan Hudec, Maksim Rezenov, Spacemanic Ltd (Slovakia); Peter Hanák, Faculty of Aeronautics, Technical University of Kosice (Slovakia)
20 July 2022 • 14:20 - 14:40 EDT | Room 523
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For localizing gamma-ray transient, we proposed the CAMELOT (Cubesats Applied for MEasuring and LOcalising Transients) mission and launched the 1U precursor called GRBAlpha. Following this successful demonstration mission, we continue with the design of the 3U prototype of the CAMELOT satellite, which will host a six times larger detector system integrated into two walls of the satellite. Since the CubeSat standard does not allow enough lateral extension on the sides, the casing has to be sunk into the satellite. Here, we present a solution on how to integrate the scintillator casing, the uniquely designed electronics and commercially available satellite subsystems.
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CANCELED: BlackCAT CubeSat: A Soft X-ray Sky Monitor, Transient Finder, and Burst Detector for High-energy and Multi-messenger Astrophysics
Author(s): Abraham D. Falcone, Tyler Anderson, Cole Armstrong, Logan Baker, David N. Burrows, Zachary Catlin, Joseph Colosimo, Seth Culbertson, Derek Fox, Daniel LaRocca, Gooderham McCormick, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); David Palmer, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Mitchell Wages, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
20 July 2022 • 14:40 - 15:00 EDT | Room 523
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BlackCAT is an X-ray coded aperture telescope on a 6U CubeSat platform, with an expected launch in 2024. It is designed for observations of bright X-ray sources in the 0.5–20 keV band. The instrument will have a wide field of view (0.9 steradian) and be capable of catching gamma ray bursts from the distant universe, galactic transients, and flares from blazars, while simultaneously monitoring the X-ray sky for rare and exciting events including gravitational wave X-ray counterparts, magnetar flares, supernova shock breakouts, and tidal disruption events. The mission will thus function as a multi-wavelength/messenger complement to many present and future facilities, and will provide rapid notifications to the community. X-ray hybrid CMOS detectors will form the focal plane array. In addition to carrying out its mission science programs, BlackCAT will also serve as a pathfinder for future economical missions. An overview of mission design, plans, and science will be presented.
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Author(s): Ariadna Calcines-Rosario, Durham Univ. (United Kingdom), Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Sarah Matthews, Hamish Reid, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
20 July 2022 • 14:40 - 15:00 EDT | Room 523
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The sun is a privileged place to study a fundamental astrophysical problem throughout the universe: particle acceleration. The Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) contains a number of narrow emission lines whose profiles allow the presence of non-Maxwellian particle distributions to be diagnosed. The photon fluxes at these wavelengths are low and the only way to observe is from space. Integral Field Spectroscopy combined with polarimetry is key for the study of the sun, but the current EUV technology is limiting. This communication explores new highly efficient IFUs based on the application of image slicers to either slice or dice the field of view, combining the surfaces of the IFU with those of the spectrograph, leading to very compact Integral Field Spectrograph solutions suitable for space applications. The advantages of this IFU proposal and the current technology limitations to achieve the science cases for the next generation of solar space missions are addressed in this presentation.
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Author(s): Alyson Joens, The George Washington Univ. (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Isabella Brewer, Univ. of Delaware (United States); Michael Briggs, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); Alessandro Bruno, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), The Catholic Univ. of America (United States); Eric Burns, Louisiana State Univ. (United States); Regina Caputo, Brad Cenko, Georgia de Nolfo, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Adam Goldstein, Universities Space Research Association (United States); Sean Griffin, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Ctr., Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Sylvain Guiriec, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), The George Washington Univ. (United States); Lorraine Hanlon, Ctr. for Space Research, Univ. College Dublin (United States); Dieter H. Hartmann, Clemson Univ. (United States); Boyan A. Hristov, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); Michelle Hui, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Carolyn Kierans, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); R. Marc Kippen, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Dan Kocevski, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); John Krizmanic, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Sibasish Laha, The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Amy Lien, Univ. of Tampa (United States); Israel Martinez-Castellanos, The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Univ. of Maryland (United States); Sheila McBreen, Ctr. for Space Research, Univ. College Dublin (Ireland); Julie E. McEnery, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); J. Grant Mitchell, The George Washington Univ. (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Lee Mitchell, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); David Morris, Univ. of the Virgin Islands (Virgin Islands, British); David Murphy, Ctr. for Space Research, Univ. College Dublin (United States); Pi Nuessle, The George Washington Univ. (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Jeremy Perkins, Judith L. Racusin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Oliver Roberts, Universities Space Research Association (United States); Peter Shawhan, Univ. of Maryland (United States); Jacob R. Smith, The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Teresa Tatoli, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), The Catholic Univ. of America (United States); Alexey Uliyanov, Sarah Walsh, Ctr. for Space Research, Univ. College Dublin (United States); Colleen Wilson-Hodge, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
20 July 2022 • 15:00 - 15:20 EDT | Room 523
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BurstCube is a 6U (10 x 20 x 30 cm) CubeSat designed for GRB detection and localization in the 50 keV to 1 MeV energy band. BurstCube will expand sky-coverage and provide electromagnetic counterparts to GW events. The BurstCube provided localizations are enabled by the energy and angular dependent detector response which has been thoroughly described through calibrations. Calibrations have also been used to validate simulations from which the detector response matrices, multidimensional matrices which determine the localizations and spectral properties of detected GRBs, have been calculated. We present the status of the mission and describe calibration and simulation efforts.
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Author(s): Richard S. Woolf, Eric Grove, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Michael Briggs, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); Mitch Davis, Theodore Finne, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Neil Johnson, Praxis, Inc., Technology Service Corp. (United States); Matthew Kerr, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Daniel Kocevski, Colleen Wilson-Hodge, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
20 July 2022 • 15:20 - 15:40 EDT | Room 523
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We describe Glowbug, a gamma-ray telescope for GRBs and other transients in the 30 keV to 2 MeV band. Built by NRL, the instrument will be launched to the ISS by the DoD Space Test Program in early 2023. Glowbug’s primary science objective is the detection and localization of short GRBs, which are the result of mergers of stellar binaries involving a neutron star with either another neutron star or a black hole. While the instrument is designed to complement existing GRB detection systems, it serves as a technology demonstrator for future networks of sensitive, low-cost gamma-ray transient detectors that provide all-sky coverage and improved localization. In a full mission life, Glowbug will detect dozens of short GRBs and provide burst spectra, lightcurves, and positions for gamma-ray context in multi-messenger studies of these merger events.
Break
Coffee Break 15:40 - 16:00
Session 12: Einstein and SVOM
20 July 2022 • 16:00 - 17:00 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Taro Sakao, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
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Author(s): Karine Mercier, François Gonzalez, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Diego Götz, CEA-IRFU (France); Martin Boutelier, Narjiss Boufracha, Sebastien Clamagirand, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Adrien Fort, Thales Services Numeriques SAS (France); Albert Gomes, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Emmanuel Guilhem, Altran Technologies (France); Jean-Michel Le Duigou, Julien Sanisidro, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Aline Meuris, CEA-IRFU (France); Charlotte Feldman, James F. Pearson, Richard Willingale, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom); Vadim Burwitz, Norbert Meidinger, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Florent Robinet, Lab. de Physique des 2 Infinis Irène Joliot-Curie (France)
20 July 2022 • 16:00 - 16:20 EDT | Room 523
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The SVOM (Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) French-Chinese mission is dedicated to the detection, localization and study of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena. The MXT instrument, developed under the responsibility of the National French Space Agency (CNES), is dedicated to GRB follow-up observation in soft X-ray band and is one of the four instruments implemented on the Chinese satellite. We first describe the design of this instrument and then provide more details about the main results of the qualification performed with all MXT models and how final design has been updated in consequence. Finally, we will conclude with our feedbacks on this kind of instrument and development.
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Author(s): Charlotte H. Feldman, Richard Willingale, James Pearson, Gillian Butcher, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom); Philip Peterson, Univ of Leicester (United Kingdom); Tony Crawford, Paul Houghton, Roisin Speight, Alexander Lodge, Christopher Bicknell, Julian P. Osborne, Paul O'Brien, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom); Miranda Bradshaw, Vadim Burwitz, Gisela Hartner, Andreas Langmeier, Thomas Müller, Surangkhana Rukdee, Thomas Schmidt, PANTER, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Diego Götz, CEA-IRFU (France); Karine Mercier, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Jean-Michel Le Duigou, François Gonzalez, CEA-IRFU (France); Emile Schyns, Romain Roudot, Ray Fairbend, Julien Seguy, PHOTONIS France SAS (France)
20 July 2022 • 16:20 - 16:40 EDT | Room 523
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SVOM, a Chinese - French mission, launching in 2022, includes the Microchannel X-ray Telescope (MXT). The MXT is a lobster eye, focusing telescope comprising 25 micro pore optic plates, working at 0.2-10 keV. We present details of the flight model MXT optic calibration campaign, at PANTER (MPE). Designed, built and initially tested at the University of Leicester, the MXT optic calibration included studies of effective area, focal length and PSF shape and size at various energies. The modelling of the optic, used to analyse the data in the test campaign, are also detailed.
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Author(s): Dervis Vernani, Giovanni Bianucci, Gabriele Grisoni, Fabio Marioni, Giuseppe Valsecchi, Media Lario S.r.l. (Italy); Arnoud Keerman, European Space Agency (Netherlands); Yong Chen, Min Cong, Yanji Yang, Juan Wang, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Vadim Burwitz, Josef Eder, Peter Friedrich, Gisela Hartner, Thomas Mueller, Surankhana Rukdee, Thomas Schmidt, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
20 July 2022 • 16:40 - 17:00 EDT | Room 523
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The Einstein Probe (EP) is a mission of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) dedicated to time-domain high-energy astrophysics. Its primary goals are to discover high-energy transients and monitor variable objects. The ESA Science Programme Committee (SPC) approved on 19 June 2018 the participation of ESA to the CAS EP mission as a Mission of Opportunity. Among other elements, CAS has requested ESA participation for the provision of the Mirror Modules of the Follow-Up X-ray Telescope (FXT). FXT is a pair of Wolter-I telescopes operating in the 0.5-10 keV energy range, inheriting the design from eROSITA.. Media Lario produced and integrated the FXT Mirror Modules, each comprising 54 nested repliformed mirror shells; Max-Planck Institute (MPE) conducted the X-ray optical tests at the PANTER facility, for the acceptance of all the different models. This efficient collaboration enabled the on-time and in-quality delivery of the FXT Mirror Modules.
Thursday Plenary Session
21 July 2022 • 08:30 - 10:00 EDT | Room 517 d
Join the Thursday Plenary Session, which will include a discussion of emerging technologies.
Break
Coffee Break 10:00 - 10:30
Session 13: XRISM
21 July 2022 • 10:30 - 11:40 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Roland H. den Hartog, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
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Author(s): Yoshitaka Ishisaki, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Richard L. Kelley, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Hisamitsu Awaki, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Jesus C. Balleza, Kim R. Barnstable, Thomas G. Bialas, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Rozenn Boissay-Malaquin, Univ. of Maryland (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Gregory V. Brown, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Edgar R. Canavan, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Renata S. Cumbee, Univ. of Maryland (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Timothy M. Carnahan, Meng P. Chiao, Brian J. Comber, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Elisa Costantini, Jan-Willem den Herder, Johannes Dercksen, Cor P. de Vries, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Michael J. DiPirro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Yuichiro Ezoe, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Carlo Ferrigno, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Ryuichi Fujimoto, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Nathalie Gorter, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Steven M. Graham, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Martin Grim, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Leslie S. Hartz, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Takayuki Hayashi, Univ. of Maryland (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Natalie Hell, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Akio Hoshino, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yuto Ichinohe, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Manabu Ishida, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Kumi Ishikawa, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Bryan L. James, Steven J. Kenyon, Caroline A. Kilbourne, Mark O. Kimball, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Shunji Kitamoto, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Maurice A. Leutenegger, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yoshitomo Maeda, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Dan McCammon, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Joseph J. Miko, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Misaki Mizumoto, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Atsushi Okamoto, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Stephane Paltani, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Frederick S. Porter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Kosuke Sato, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Toshiki Sato, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Makoto Sawada, RIKEN (Japan); Keisuke Shinozaki, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Russell Shipman, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Peter J. Shirron, Gary A. Sneiderman, Yang Soong, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Andrew E. Szymkowiak, Yale Univ. (United States); Yoh Takei, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Keisuke Tamura, Univ. of Maryland (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Masahiro Tsujimoto, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Michael C. Witthoeft, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Rob Wolfs, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Shinya Yamada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Susumu Yasuda, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
21 July 2022 • 10:30 - 10:50 EDT | Room 523
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The Resolve instrument onboard the X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission (XRISM) consists of an array of 6x6 silicon-thermistor microcalorimeters cooled down to 50 mK and a high-throughput X-ray mirror assembly with a focal length of 5.6 m. XRISM is a recovery mission of ASTRO-H/Hitomi. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) onboard Hitomi demonstrated high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of ~ 5 eV FWHM in orbit. The Resolve instrument is mostly a copy of the Hitomi SXS and Soft X-ray Telescope designs, with several changes based on the lessons learned of Hitomi. We report the current status of the Resolve instrument.
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Author(s): Koji Mori, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Hiroshi Tomida, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hiroshi Nakajima, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Hirofumi Noda, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Takaaki Tanaka, Konan Univ. (Japan); Hiroyuki Uchida, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Kouichi Hagino, Shogo Kobayashi, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Hiromasa Suzuki, Konan Univ. (Japan); Tessei Yoshida, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hiroshi Murakami, Tohoku Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Hideki Uchiyama, Shizuoka Univ. (Japan); Masayoshi Nobukawa, Nara Univ. of Education (Japan); Kumiko Nobukawa, Kindai Univ. (Japan); Tomokage Yoneyama, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hironori Matsumoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Takeshi G. Tsuru, Konan Univ. (Japan); Makoto Yamauchi, Isamu Hatsukade, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Manabu Ishida, Yoshitomo Maeda, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Takayuki Hayashi, Keisuke Tamura, Rozenn Boissay-Malaquin, Univ. of Maryland (United States); Toshiki Sato, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Junko Hiraga, Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Takayoshi Kohmura, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Kazutaka Yamaoka, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Tadayasu Dotani, Masanobu Ozaki, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hiroshi Tsunemi, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Yoshiaki Kanemaru, Jin Sato, Toshiyuki Takaki, Yuta Terada, Keitaro Miyazaki, Kohei Kusunoki, Yoshinori Otsuka, Haruhiko Yokosu, Wakana Yonemaru, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Yoh Asahina, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Kazunori Asakura, Marina Yoshimoto, Yuichi Ode, Tomohiko Hakamata, Mio Aoyagi, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Yuma Aoki, Kindai Univ. (Japan); Shun Tsunomachi, Toshiki Doi, Daiki Aoki, Kaito Fujisawa, Masatoshi Kitajima, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Kiyoshi Hayashida, Osaka Univ. (Japan)
21 July 2022 • 10:50 - 11:10 EDT | Room 523
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We report on the development status of Xtend, a soft X-ray imaging telescope for the X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission (XRISM). XRISM is scheduled to be launched by April 2023. Xtend consists of the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI), an X-ray CCD camera, and the X-ray Mirror Assembly (XMA), a thin-foil-nested conical optics. We have completed the fabrication of the flight model of both the SXI and XMA, and verified the performance in a series of sub-system level tests. Initial results of the calibration measurements are also presented.
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Author(s): Rozenn Boissay-Malaquin, Takayuki Hayashi, Keisuke Tamura, Ctr. for Space Sciences and Technology, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Toshiki Sato, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Lawrence Olsen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Richard Koenecke, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), ADNET Systems, Inc. (United States); Wilson Lara, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), BGE Technology LLC (United States); Leor Bleier, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Megan Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Maurice Leutenegger, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Tahir Yaqoob, Ctr. for Space Sciences and Technology, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Meng Chiao, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
21 July 2022 • 11:10 - 11:25 EDT | Room 523
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We present a summary of the ground calibration of the X-ray Mirror Assemblies (XMAs) for the XRISM satellite, that is performed at the X-ray beamline at NASA/GSFC. We use a scan method with a narrow X-ray pencil beam to calibrate both Resolve and Xtend XMAs, at nine different energies. In this first presentation, we give an overview of the measurement setup, and show the resulting on-axis and off-axis effective area response. Other measurements will be presented in two other parts of the ground calibration summary.
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Author(s): Keisuke Tamura, Takayuki Hayashi, Rozenn Boissay-Malaquin, Ctr. for Space Sciences and Technology, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Toshiki Sato, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Lawrence Olsen, Richard Koenecke, Wilson Lara, Leor Bleier, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Megan Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Maurice Leutenegger, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Tahir Yaqoob, Ctr. for Space Sciences and Technology, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Meng Chiao, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
21 July 2022 • 11:25 - 11:40 EDT | Room 523
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The ground calibration of the X-ray Mirror Assembly (XMA) to be boarded on the X-ray astronomy satellite XRISM scheduled to be launched by April 2023 has been carried out at 100m X-ray beamline in NASA/GSFC. We will report the results of the measurements of the imaging performance and the stray light. And the back-illuminated X-ray CCD system used for these measurements and its background subtraction method will be also presented.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 11:40 - 13:00
Session 14: EXTP
21 July 2022 • 13:00 - 14:20 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
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Author(s): Shuang-Nan Zhang, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Marco Feroci, INAF (Italy); Margarita Hernanz, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (Spain); Andrea Santangelo, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Fangjun Lu, Yupeng Xu, Yong Chen, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Hua Feng, Tsinghua Univ. (China); Kirpal Nandra, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Weichun Jiang, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Jiri Svoboda, Astronomical Institute of the CAS, v.v.i. (Czech Republic); Søren Brandt, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Stéphane Schanne, CEA (France); Jean In't Zand, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Malgosia Michalska, Space Research Ctr. Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Enrico Bozzo, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Emrah Kalemci, Sabanci Univ. (Turkey); Ge Jin, Longhui Li, Wei Xu, Zhao Xu, North Night Vision Technology Co. (China); Shu Zhang, Liming Song, Huilin He, Xuelei Cao, Fan Zhang, Xiaojing Liu, Yanji Yang, Min Cong, Zeyu Song, Jiawei Zhang, Ke Yu, Yusa Wang, Wei Li, Dawei Han, Weiwei Cui, Ziliang Zhang, Hao Wang, Tianxiang Chen, Jia Ma, Jia Huo, Maoshun Li, Dongjie Hou, Xiongtao Yang, Zijian Zhao, Xiaofan Zhao, Jingjing Xu, Laidan Luo, Yuxuan Zhu, Can Chen, Yudong Gu, Yuanyuan Du, Sheng Yang, Liang Sun, Jiawei Yang, Xiangyang Wen, Bin Meng, Aimei Zhang, Ruijie Wang, Tong Zhang, Bing Lu, Na Gao, Jiewei Cao, Xiongwei Xu, Tao Luo, Liqiang Qi, Gang Li, Jinlu Qu, Liao Tao, Shumei Jia, Mingyu Ge, Shijie Zheng, Xiaobo Li, Xiang Ma, Yue Huang, Chengkui Li, Jianyin Nie, Haisheng Zhao, Ju Guan, Yupeng Chen, Juan Zhang, Lingjun Wang, Ge Ou, Jingyan Shi, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Chris Tenzer, Emanuele Perinati, Samuel Pliego, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
21 July 2022 • 13:00 - 13:20 EDT | Room 523
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The enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry mission (eXTP) is a flagship observatory for X-ray timing, spectroscopy and polarimetry developed by an International Consortium. Thanks to its very large collecting area, good spectral resolution and unprecedented polarimetry capabilities, eXTP will explore the properties of matter and the propagation of light in the most extreme conditions found in the Universe. eXTP will, in addition, be a powerful X-ray observatory. The mission will continuously monitor the X-ray sky, and will enable multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies. The mission is currently in phase B, which will be completed in the middle of 2022.
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Author(s): Marco Feroci, INAF - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (Italy); Walter Bonvicini, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Manuel Guedel, Univ. Wien (Austria); Piotr Orleanski, Space Research Ctr. Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Andrea Santangelo, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Stéphane Schanne, CEA (France); Vladimír Karas, Czech Academy of Sciences (Czech Republic); Xin Wu, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Shuang-Nan Zhang, Fang-Jun Lu, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Andrea Argan, Yuri Evangelista, Ettore Del Monte, INAF - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (Italy); Gianluigi Zampa, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Yupeng Xu, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Marco Barbera, INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo (Italy); Pierluigi Bellutti, Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Italy); Riccardo Campana, INAF OAS (Italy); Yannick Favre, Franck Cadoux, Enrico Bozzo, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Roland Ottensamer, Univ. Wien (Austria); Jan-Willem den Herder, SRON (Netherlands); Elisabetta Cavazzuti, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (Italy); Immacolata Donnarumma, Italian Space Agency (Italy); Christopher Tenzer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Francesco Ceraudo, Alessandra De Rosa, INAF - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (Italy)
21 July 2022 • 13:20 - 13:35 EDT | Room 523
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(Additional authors not shown) The Large Area Detector (LAD) is the high-throughput, spectral-timing instrument onboard the eXTP mission, a major project of CAS and CNSA with a large European participation. The eXTP mission is currently performing its phase B study, with a target launch at the end-2027. The eXTP scientific payload includes four instruments (SFA, PFA, LAD and WFM) offering unprecedented simultaneous wide-band X-ray timing and polarimetry sensitivity. The LAD instrument is based on the design originally proposed for the LOFT mission. It envisages a deployed 3.1 m2 effective area in the 2-30 keV energy range, achieved through the technology of the large-area Silicon Drift Detectors - offering a spectral resolution of up to 200 eV FWHM at 6 keV - and of capillary plate collimators - limiting the field of view to about 1 degree. In this paper we will provide an overview of the LAD instrument design, its current status of development and anticipated performance.
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Author(s): Margarita Hernanz, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain), Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (Spain); Søren Brandt, DTU Space (Denmark); Jean In't Zand, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Yuri Evangelista, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Aline Meuris, CEA-IRFU (France); Chris Tenzer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Gianluigi Zampa, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Piotr Orleanski, Space Research Ctr. Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Emrah Kalemci, Sabanci Univ. (Turkey); Müberra Sungur, TÜBITAK Space Technologies Research Institute (Turkey); Stéphane Schanne, CEA-IRFU (France); Frans Zwart, Rob de la Rie, Phillip Laubert, Coen van Baren, Gabby Aitink-Kroes, Lucien Kuiper, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Jörg Bayer, Paul Hedderman, Samuel Pliego, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Riccardo Campana, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Ettore Del Monte, Marco Feroci, Francesco Ceraudo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Olivier Gevin, CEA-IRFU (France); Irfan Kuvvetli, DTU Space (Denmark); Denis Tcherniak, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Konrad Skup, Malgorzata Michalska, Witold Nowosielski, Space Research Ctr. Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Ander Hormaetxe, José-Luis Gálvez, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain); Patrícia Ferrés, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (Spain); Alessandro Patruno, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain); Walter Bonvicini, Matias Antonelli, Mirko Boezio, Daniela Cirrincione, Riccardo Munini, Alexandre Rachevski, Nicola Zampa, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Irina Rashevskaya, TIFPA (Italy); Andrea Argan, INAF (Italy); Onur Turhan, TÜBITAK Space Technologies Research Institute (Turkey); Enrico Bozzo, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Andrea Santangelo, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Shuang-Nan Zhang, Fangjun Lu, Yupeng Xu, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Ayhan Bozkurt, Sabanci Univ. (Turkey)
21 July 2022 • 13:35 - 13:50 EDT | Room 523
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The eXTP (enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry) mission is a major project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), with a large involvement of Europe. The scientific payload of eXTP includes four instruments: SFA (Spectroscopy Focusing Array) and PFA (Polarimetry Focusing Array) - led by China - and LAD (Large Area Detector) and WFM (Wide Field Monitor) - led by Europe (Italy and Spain). They offer an unique simultaneous wide-band X-ray timing and polarimetry sensitivity. The WFM for eXTP will be a wide field X-ray monitor instrument in the 2-50 keV energy range. Its unprecedented combination of large field of view and imaging down to 2 keV will allow eXTP to make important discoveries of the variable and transient X-ray sky.
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Author(s): Yusa Wang, Yong Chen, Wei Li, YanJi Yang, Zeyu Song, Jia Ma, Yupeng Xu, Fangjun Lu, ShuangNan Zhang, HuiLin He, XueLei Cao, Shu Zhang, Gang Li, Juan Zhang, Liqiang Qi, Juan Wang, Weiwei Cui, Tianxiang Chen, Ziliang Zhang, Maoshun Li, Dawei Han, Laidan Luo, Min Cong, Xiongtao Yang, Dongjie Hou, Zijian Zhao, Xiaofan Zhao, Can Chen, Zhonghua Lv, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Bo Wang, Langping Wang, DianLong Wang, Duo Li, Harbin Institute of Technology (China); LiZhi Sheng, PengFei Qiang, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (China); Thomas Bechteler, Vadim Burwitz, Kirpal Nandra, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Stefano Basso, Giorgia Sironi, Giovanni Pareschi, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); JiaWei Zhang, Institute of High Energy Physics (China), Harbin Institute of Technology (China); Yuxuan Zhu, Institute of High Energy Physics (China), Jilin Univ. (China)
21 July 2022 • 13:50 - 14:05 EDT | Room 523
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The eXTP (enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry) mission is a flagship international collaboration mission led by China, with large contribution from European countries. The eXTP mission is designed to understand the physics of compact objects under extreme conditions of gravity, density and magnetism. The SFA is one of the four main payloads onboard eXTP. The SFA contains 9 identical telescopes for high effective area. The SFA telescopes are based on Nickel electroforming Wolter-I mirror technology, with focal length 5.25m and a field of view 12 arcmin. To achieve good energy and time performance, a 19 cells SDDs is selected as the baseline detector. SFA is currently in Phase-B studies and will be adopted in the next two years. In this paper we provide an overview of the SFA instrument, including designs of optics and detectors and current status. Besides a 100m calibration facility has been constructed at IHEP and is already for the test of the X-ray mirrors and detectors.
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Author(s): Weichun Jiang, Institute of High Energy Physics (China)
21 July 2022 • 14:05 - 14:20 EDT | Room 523
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The Polarimetric Focusing Array (PFA) is one of the four scientific payloads onboard the enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry (eXTP) mission. The PFA consists of four identical telescopes optimized for X-ray imaging polarimetry, sensitive in the energy range of 2-8 keV. It offers energy, time, and spatially resolved X-ray polarimetry at high sensitivity, and is the only instrument on eXTP capable of imaging with a resolution better than an arcminute. The PFA features a sensitivity in polarimetry down to 3% given a 1ks observation of the Crab. Here we show the current design and the progress in the development of the PFA.
Session 15: Missions Under Development/Proposed
21 July 2022 • 14:20 - 17:10 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Shuang-Nan Zhang, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
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Author(s): Randall K. Smith, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Joel Bregman, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Laura Brenneman, Nancy Brickhouse, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Esra Bulbul, Vadim Burwitz, Max Planck Gesellschaft Zur Foerderung Der Wissenschaften E.V. (Germany); Deepto Chakrabarty, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Elisa Costantini, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Casey DeRoo, University of Iowa (United States); Abe Falcone, Pennsylvania State University (United States); Luigi Gallo, Saint Mary's University (Canada); Catherine Grant, Hans Guenther, Ralf Heilmann, Sarah Heine, David Huenemoerder, Erin Kara, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Ingo Kreykenbohm, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Kristin Madsen, University of Maryland Baltimore County (United States); Herman Marshall, Michael McDonald, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Jon Miller, University Of Michigan (United States); Eric Miller, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Richard Mushotzky, University of Maryland College Park (United States); Katja Poppenhaeger, Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam (Germany); Paul Reid, Jenna Samra, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Jeremy Sanders, Max Planck Gesellschaft Zur Foerderung Der Wissenschaften E.V. (Germany); Mark Schattenburg, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Pasquale Temi, NASA Ames Research Center (United States); Marshall Bautz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Randall McEntaffer, Pennsylvania State University (United States); Kirpal Nandra, Max Planck Gesellschaft Zur Foerderung Der Wissenschaften E.V. (Germany); Agata Rozanska, Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Joern Wilms, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Claude Canizares, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Jelle Kaastra, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Frederik Paerels, Columbia University (United States); Lynne Valencic, Johns Hopkins University (United States); Norbert Schulz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Alan Smale, Andrew Ptak, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (United States); Scott Wolk, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Joseph Bushman, Northrop Grumman Corp. (United States); Elisabeth Morse, Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems, Inc. (United States); Jonathan Schonfeld, Adam Foster, Peter Cheimets, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Steve Jara, Karolyn Ronzano, Butler Hine, NASA Ames Research Center (United States); Robert Petre, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (United States); Stephen Walker, NASA Ames Research Center (United States)
21 July 2022 • 14:20 - 14:35 EDT | Room 523
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Supermassive black holes (SMBH) interact with gas in the interstellar and intergalactic media (ISM/IGM) in a process termed “feedback” that is key to the formation and evolution of galaxies and clusters. Characterizing the origins and physical mechanisms governing this feedback requires tracing the propagation of outflowing mass, energy and momentum from the vicinity of the SMBH out to megaparsec scales. Our ability to understand the interplay between feedback and structure evolution across multiple scales, as well as a wide range of other important astrophysical phenomena, depends on diagnostics only available in soft X-ray spectra (10-50 Å). Arcus combines high-resolution, efficient, lightweight X-ray gratings with silicon pore optics to provide R~2500 with an average effective area of ~200 cm2, an order of magnitude larger than the Chandra gratings.
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Author(s): Koji Mori, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Takeshi G. Tsuru, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Yoshihiro Ueda, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Shin Watanabe, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Takaaki Tanaka, Konan Univ. (Japan); Manabu Ishida, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hironori Matsumoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Hisamitsu Awaki, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Hiroshi Murakami, Tohoku Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Masayoshi Nobukawa, Nara Univ. of Education (Japan); Ayaki Takeda, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Yasushi Fukazawa, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Hiroshi Tsunemi, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Tadayuki Takahashi, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Ann E. Hornschemeier, Takashi Okajima, William W. Zhang, Brian J. Williams, Kristin Madsen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Mihoko Yukita, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States); Hiroki Akamatsu, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Aya Bamba, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Teruaki Enoto, RIKEN (Japan); Yutaka Fujita, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Akihiro Furuzawa, Fujita Health Univ. (Japan); Kouichi Hagino, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Kosei Ishimura, Waseda Univ. (Japan); Masayuki Itoh, Kobe Univ. (Japan); Tetsu Kitayama, Toho Univ. (Japan); Shogo B. Kobayashi, Takayoshi Kohmura, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Aya Kubota, Shibaura Institute of Technology (Japan); Misaki Mizumoto, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Tsunefumi Mizuno, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Hiroshi Nakajima, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Kumiko K. Nobukawa, Kindai Univ. (Japan); Hirofumi Noda, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Hirokazu Odaka, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Masanori Ohno, Eötvös Loránd Univ. (Hungary); Naomi Ota, Nara Women's Univ. (Japan); Toshiki Sato, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Megumi Shidatsu, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Hiromasa Suzuki, Konan Univ. (Japan); Hiromitsu Takahashi, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Atsushi Tanimoto, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Yukikatsu Terada, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Yuichi Terashima, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Hiroyuki Uchida, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Yasunobu Uchiyama, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Hiroya Yamaguchi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yoichi Yatsu, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)
21 July 2022 • 14:35 - 14:50 EDT | Room 523
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We present the Focusing on Relativistic universe and Cosmic Evolution (FORCE) mission, the product of a JAXA/NASA collaboration. The FORCE mission will achieve 10 times higher sensitivity in the hard X-ray band in comparison to any previous hard X-ray mission. FORCE aims to be launched in the early 2030s, as a perfect hard X-ray complement to Athena. FORCE provides broadband (1-79 keV) X-ray imaging spectroscopy with high angular resolution (<15"). FORCE will be the most powerful X-ray probe for discovering obscured/hidden black holes and studying high energy particle acceleration in our Universe.
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Author(s): Yuichiro Ezoe, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Ryu Funase, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Harunori Nagata, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan); Yoshizumi Miyoshi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Hiroshi Nakajima, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Ikuyuki Mitsuishi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Kumi Ishikawa, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Yosuke Kawabata, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Shintaro Nakajima, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Landon Kamps, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan); Masaki Numazawa, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Tomokage Yoneyama, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Kouichi Hagino, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Yosuke Matsumoto, Chiba Univ. (Japan); Keisuke Hosokawa, The Univ. of Electro-Communications (Japan); Satoshi Kasahara, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Junko Hiraga, Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Kazuhisa Mitsuda, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Masaki Fujimoto, Munetaka Ueno, Atsushi Yamazaki, Hiroshi Hasegawa, Takefumi Mitani, Yasuhiro Kawakatsu, Takahiro Iwata, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hiroyuki Koizumi, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Hironori Sahara, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Yoshiaki Kanamori, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Kohei Morishita, Kyushu Univ. (Japan)
21 July 2022 • 14:50 - 15:05 EDT | Room 523
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GEO-X (GEOspace X-ray imager) is a small satellite mission aiming at visualization of the Earth’s magnetosphere by X-rays and revealing dynamical couplings between solar wind and magnetosphere. In-situ spacecraft have revealed various phenomena in the magnetosphere. However, it has been supposed that the global imaging of the magnetosphere is not possible. In recent years, X-ray astronomy satellite observations discovered soft X-ray emission originated from the magnetosphere. We therefore develop GEO-X by integrating innovative technologies of the wide FOV X-ray instrument and the microsatellite technology for deep space exploration.
Coffee Break 15:05 - 15:35
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Author(s): Kazutaka Yamaoka, Hiroyasu Tajima, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Kikuko Miyata, Meijo Univ. (Japan); Masaki Usami, Toyoki Watabe, Koji Matsushita, Kazuya Ito, Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Satoshi Masuda, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Koichi Tani, Masaki Arai, Jinsei, Inc. (Japan); Satoshi Hatori, Kyo Kume, Satoshi 14 Mizushima, The Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center (Japan); Hiromitsu Takahashi, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Kyoko Watanabe, National Defense Academy (Japan)
21 July 2022 • 15:35 - 15:50 EDT | Room 523
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The SOlar Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (SONGS) mission is a 3U cubesat dedicated for detecting neutrons and gamma-rays associated with intense solar flares. Solar neutron observations have not been in progress because ground-based observations are affected by attenuation in the Earth atmosphere, and there is no dedicated mission in space at present. Hence, we are now developing in collaboration between science and engineering people at universities, and preparing for launch around 2024 during the next solar maximum. The SONGS carries a novel radiation detector which consists of multi-layered plastic scintillator bars and GAGG(Ce) scintillator array so that it can determine energies for both neutrons and gamma-rays. In total 704 signals from Silicon photo-multipliers are processed by 45 ASICs, and realized within limited resources. In this presentation, we will describe scientific motivation, mission and instrument overview, and results from the bread-board model (BBM).
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Author(s): Lorenzo Amati, Claudio Labanti, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Sandro Mereghetti, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Filippo Frontera, Univ. degli Studi di Ferrara (Italy); Riccardo Campana, Fabio Fuschino, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Cristiano Guidorzi, Lisa Ferro, Univ. degli Studi di Ferrara (Italy)
21 July 2022 • 15:50 - 16:10 EDT | Room 523
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We describe the science case, design and expected performances of the X/Gamma-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XGIS), a GRB and transients monitor developed and studied for the THESEUS mission project, capable of covering an exceptionally wide energy band (2 keV – 10 MeV), with imaging capabilities and location accuracy <15 arcmin up to 150 keV over a Field of View of 2sr, a few hundreds eV energy resolution in the X-ray band (<30 keV) and few micro seconds time resolution over the whole energy band. Thanks to a design based on a modular approach, the XGIS can be easily re-scaled and adapted for fitting the available resources and specific scientific objectives of future high-energy astrophysics missions, and especially those aimed at fully exploiting GRBs and high-energy transients for multi-messenger astrophysics and fundamental physics.
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Author(s): William W. Zhang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
21 July 2022 • 16:10 - 16:30 EDT | Room 523
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STAR-X is a MIDEX mission proposed to NASA in December 2021. Comprising an X-ray telescope (XRT) provided by GSFC and MIT, a UV telescope (UVT) provided by the University of Colorado, and a spacecraft (SC) provided by Ball Aerospace, STAR-X is designed to conduct time-domain survey and to respond rapidly to transient events discovered by other observatories such as LIGO, Rubin LSST, Roman WFIRST, and SKA. STAR-X is a timely response to Astro2020’s recommendation for a space-based, sustaining time-domain and multi-messenger program.
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Author(s): Lindsay Glesener, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Juan Camilo Buitrago-Casas, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Jessie M. Duncan, Yixian Zhang, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Shunsaku Nagasawa, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Japan); Savannah Perez-Piel, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Ayumu Takigawa, Koki Sakuta, Kazuki Ampuku, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Juliana Vievering, Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab., LLC (United States); Sophie Musset, European Space Agency (Netherlands); P. S. Athiray, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); Athanasios Pantazides, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Wayne Baumgartner, Stephen Bongiorno, Patrick Champey, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Steven Christe, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Sasha Courtade, Hunter Kanniainen, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Säm Krucker, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States), Fachhochschule NordWestschweiz (Switzerland); Juan Carlos Martinez Oliveros, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States); Ikuyuki Mitsuishi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Noriyuki Narukage, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Eliad Peretz, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Tadayuki Takahashi, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Japan); Shin Watanabe, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
21 July 2022 • 16:30 - 16:50 EDT | Room 523
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The first three flights of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket established the usefulness and feasibility of direct-focusing hard X-ray instruments optimized for the Sun. While the fundamental building blocks of this concept are ready for a spacecraft mission, concurrent development is required to prepare for a subsequent generation of high-energy solar explorers, which will require higher rates and even better angular resolution. The fourth flight of FOXSI features technological advances for high resolution and high rate capability. We are developing high-precision mirror production methods, substrip/subpixel resolution in fine-pitch CdTe sensors, and novel pixelated attenuators (that optimize energy coverage even at high rates). These technologies will be demonstrated in NASA’s first-ever solar flare campaign in March 2024. Multiple payloads will be launched during a solar flare, supporting Parker Solar Probe observations during one of its perihelia.
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Author(s): Kazunori Asakura, Kiyoshi Hayashida, Shotaro Sakuma, Ayami Ishikura, Kenmei Sawagami, Wataru Kamogawa, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Tomokage Yoneyama, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hirofumi Noda, Koki Okazaki, Maho Hanaoka, Kengo Hattori, Yusuke Matsushita, Taisei Mineta, Marina Yoshimoto, Yuichi Ode, Tomohiko Hakamata, Hironori Matsumoto, Hiroshi Tsunemi, Osaka Univ. (Japan)
21 July 2022 • 16:50 - 17:10 EDT | Room 523
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We have developed a novel X-ray interferometer, Multi-Image X-ray Interferometer Module (MIXIM), comprised of a fine aperture mask and an X-ray detector. The angular resolution of this system can be improved with an increase of the distance between two components or a decrease of the aperture size. We newly introduced periodic coded-aperture masks in 2020, instead of a periodic pinhole mask used until then. We demonstrated that the periodic coded-aperture could form the self-image with a 12.4 keV X-ray beam, and obtained a sub-arcsecond X-ray source profile with an effective area more than 25 times that with the periodic pinhole.
Session 16: Detectors and Miscellaneous
22 July 2022 • 09:00 - 11:30 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Marco Feroci, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy)
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Author(s): Marshall W. Bautz, Richard Foster, Catherine Grant, Beverly LaMarr, Andrew Malonis, Eric Miller, Gregory Prigozhin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Barry Burke, Michael Cooper, Kevan Donlon, Renee Lambert, Keith Warner, Doug Young, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States); Tanmoy Chattopadhyay, Sven Herrmann, Glenn Morris, Stanford Univ. (United States); Christopher Leitz, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States); Steven Allen, Stanford Univ. (United States)
22 July 2022 • 09:00 - 09:20 EDT | Room 523
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Future high-resolution X-ray imaging missions at both strategic (Probe-class and Flagship) and smaller scales require mega-pixel focal planes with high frame rates and near-theoretical spectroscopic performance. We report test results from advanced Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory for such missions. These devices incorporate two new technologies already demonstrated in small devices: a single-polysilicon gate structure enabling efficient, low-power charge transfer, and a low-noise pJFET output amplifier capable of < 3 electrons RMS noise at megahertz pixel output rates. We report results from the first application of these technologies in a prototype large format (2k x 1k pixel) frame transfer CCD with eight parallel outputs which meets total area and pixel count requirements for strategic missions. First measurements of noise, charge transfer efficiency, spectral resolution and achieve frame-rate are compared with requirements of such missions.
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Author(s): Martin de Wit, Luciano Gottardi, Kenichiro Nagayoshi, Hiroki Akamatsu, Marcel P. Bruijn, Marcel L. Ridder, Emanuele Taralli, Davide Vaccaro, Jian-Rong Gao, Jan-Willem A. den Herder, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
22 July 2022 • 09:20 - 09:40 EDT | Room 523
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We are developing Transition Edge Sensor (TES) arrays intended for the Athena X-IFU instrument. We have developed a fabrication method that allows us to make detectors with a broad range of properties, and excellent energy resolutions of below 1.8 eV at 5.9 keV. Our detectors can be finely tuned suited for read-out using multiplexing schemes using both AC and DC biasing. Recently, we have successfully added Au/Bi absorbers to increase the photon absorption efficiency. In this contribution, we will give an overview of the properties and capabilities of our state-of-the-art detectors.
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Author(s): Hiroshi Nakajima, Shotaro Nakamura, Tohya Yamagami, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Tomokage Yoneyama, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Junko Hiraga, Kwansei Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Yuichiro Ezoe, Kumi Ishikawa, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan)
22 July 2022 • 09:40 - 10:00 EDT | Room 523
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We report the development status of the focal plane detector onboard the GEO-X microsatellite. We adopt a back-side illuminated CMOS sensor as the primary candidate for satisfying the requirements of effective energy band (0.3-2 keV), optical blocking performance and moderate energy resolution. The spectroscopic performance is evaluated as 196eV (FWHM) at 6keV, and successful detection of Al-K. We also investigate radiation tolerance against total dose, which resulted in the amount of degradation of energy resolution is less than 50eV up to 10krad. We also report the design and fabrication of the camera body and back-end electronics.
Coffee Break 10:00 - 10:30
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Author(s): Hirofumi Noda, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Tasuku Hayashi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Shinya Yamada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Dai Takei, Daiphys Technologies LLC (Japan), Rikkyo Univ. (Japan), RIKEN (Japan)
22 July 2022 • 10:30 - 10:50 EDT | Room 523
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For a future X-ray interferometer onboard a single satellite, we are developing a new position-sensitive X-ray sensor by applying the Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) technology. The design of the prototype is that Ti/Au (40/90 nm) TES pixels are connected by a single oblong Au absorber (1400 μm × 20 μm × 1 μm), and we can determine photon-incident positions accurately by using rising-edge differences of individual pulses by the two TES pixels. In this paper, we introduce the design, fabrication, and X-ray irradiation experiments of the new position sensitive X-ray sensor.
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Author(s): Catherine E. Grant, Eric D. Miller, Marshall W. Bautz, Richard Foster, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Ralph P. Kraft, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Steven Allen, Stanford Univ. (United States); David N. Burrows, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
22 July 2022 • 10:50 - 11:10 EDT | Room 523
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A goal of many X-ray observatories is mapping the cosmic web through deep exposures of faint diffuse sources. Such observations require low background and the best possible knowledge of the remaining unrejected background. The dominant contribution to the background above 1-2 keV is from Galactic Cosmic Ray protons. Their flux and spectrum are modulated by the solar cycle but also solar activity on shorter timescales. Understanding this variability may prove crucial to reducing background uncertainty for ESA's Athena X-ray Observatory and other large collecting area missions. We examine the variability of the particle background as measured by ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory and compare that variability to that measured by AMS, a precision particle detector on the ISS. We show that cosmic ray proton variability measured by AMS is well matched to ACIS and can be used to estimate proton energies responsible for the background. We discuss how this can inform future missions.
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CANCELED: XMM2ATHENA, the H2020 project to improve XMM-Newton analysis software and prepare for Athena
Author(s): Natalie Webb, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Francisco Carrera, IFCA- Instituto de Física de Cantabria (Spain); Axel Schwope, Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (Germany); Christian Motch, Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg (France); Jean Ballet, CEA (France); Mike Watson, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom); Mat Page, Mullard Space Science Lab., Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Michael Freyberg, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (Germany); Ioannis Georgantopoulos, National Observatory of Athens (Greece); Mickael Coriat, Didier Barret, Zoe Massida, Maitrayee Gupta, Hugo Tranin, Erwan Quintin, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Maite Ceballos, Silvia Matteos, IFCA- Instituto de Física de Cantabria (Spain); Amalia Corral, Rosa Dominguez, Holger Stiele, IFCA-Instituto de Física de Cantabria (Spain); Iris Traulsen, Adriana Pires, Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (Germany); Ada Nebot, Laurent Michel, Pierre Maggi, Francois-Xavier Pineau, Jere Kuuttila, Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg (France); Keir Birchall, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom); Paul Kuin, Mullard Space Science Lab., Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Athanassios Akylas, Angel Ruiz, Ektoras Pouliasis, Antonis Georgakakis, National Observatory of Athens (Greece)
22 July 2022 • 11:10 - 11:30 EDT | Room 523
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X-rays allow us to detect a wide range of energetic objects in the sky. XMM-Newton, a European Space Agency X-ray observatory, has been observing the X-ray, ultra-violet and optical sky for over 22 years. During this time, astronomy has evolved to study populations rather than single sources, using multi-wavelength, multi-messenger and time domain data to understand the X-ray sources. Here we present the H2020 project, XMM2ATHENA, carried out by key members of the XMM-Newton Science ground segment, the Athena Science ground segment, and members of the X-ray community. XMM2ATHENA develops and tests new methods and software to follow the X-ray transient sky, identify multi- wavelength/messenger counterparts and determine the X-ray source nature using machine learning. Innovative stacking algorithms will allow the faintest sources to be revealed. These methods will then be adapted for the Athena software and the newly detected/identified sources will help us prepare for Athena.
Break
Lunch/Exhibition Break 11:30 - 12:30
Session 17: Gamma-ray and Polarization
22 July 2022 • 12:30 - 15:30 EDT | Room 523
Session Chair: Marshall W. Bautz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
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Author(s): Daniel Shy, National Research Council (United States); Carolyn A. Kierans, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Nicolas Cannady, The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Regina Caputo, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Sean Griffin, University of Wisconsin (United States); Eric Grove, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Elizabeth Hays, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Nicholas Kirschner, The George Washington Univ. (United States); Julie McEnery, John Mitchell, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Alexander Moiseev, The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, Univ. of Maryland (United States); Lucas Parker, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Jeremy Perkins, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Bernard Phlips, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Makoto Sasaki, The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, Univ. of Maryland (United States); Adam J. Schoenwald, The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (United States); Clio Sleator, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Jacob Smith, The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, Univ. of Maryland (United States); Lucas Smith, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Sambid Wasti, The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, The Catholic Univ. of America (United States); Richard Woolf, Eric Wulf, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Anna Zajczyk, The Ctr. for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States)
22 July 2022 • 12:30 - 12:50 EDT | Room 523
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There is a growing interest in the science uniquely enabled by observations in the MeV range, particularly in light of multi-messenger astrophysics. The Compton Pair (ComPair) telescope, a prototype of the AMEGO Probe-class concept, consists of four subsystems that together detect and characterize gamma rays in the MeV regime. A double-sided strip silicon Tracker gives a precise measure of the first Compton scatter interaction and tracks pair-conversion products. A novel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector with excellent position and energy resolution beneath the Tracker detects the Compton-scattered photons. A thick cesium iodide (CsI) calorimeter contains the high-energy Compton and pair events. The instrument is surrounded by a plastic anti-coincidence (ACD) detector to veto the cosmic-ray background. In this work, we will give an overview of the science motivation and a description of the prototype development and performance.
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Author(s): Miguel Moita, Lisa Ferro, Univ. degli Studi di Ferrara (Italy); Enrico Virgilli, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Filippo Frontera, Piero Rosati, Cristiano Guidorzi, Univ. degli Studi di Ferrara (Italy); Ezio Caroli, Mauro Orlandini, Loredana Bassani, John B. Stephen, Fabio Fuschino, Riccardo Campana, Claudio Labanti, Lorenzo Amati, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Stefano del Sordo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Palermo (Italy); Ezequiel J. Marchesini, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy)
22 July 2022 • 12:50 - 13:10 EDT | Room 523
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Gamma-ray astronomy requires a jump in sensitivity and angular resolution with respect to the present instrumentation. An innovative high energy concept of mission named ASTENA has been designed for hard X-ray spectroscopy, imaging and polarimetry. It includes a Wide Field Monitor with Imaging and Spectroscopic capabilities (WFM-IS, 2 keV - 20 MeV) and a Narrow Field Telescope (NFT, 50 - 700 keV). Thanks to the combination of angular resolution, sensitivity and large FoV, ASTENA will make a breakthrough in soft gamma-ray astronomy. We show the results of theoretical evaluations and Monte Carlo simulations aimed to optimize the spectral and polarimetric performances of the instruments.
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Author(s): Daniel Poulson, Peter Bloser, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Keiichi Ogasawara, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Jason Legere, James Ryan, Mark McConnell, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States)
22 July 2022 • 13:10 - 13:30 EDT | Room 523
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Observing cosmic sources in the medium-energy gamma-ray regime (~0.4 – 10 MeV) requires an efficient instrument with good angular resolution and background rejection. Artificial single-crystal diamond detectors (SCDDs) have comparable energy ranges, energy resolution, and threshold levels as traditional silicon solid-state detectors (SSDs), but with faster rise times (~1 ns), improved radiation hardness, and are generally insensitive to light and temperature. Here we present work preliminary to the pairing of artificial single-crystal diamond detectors (SCDDs) with CeBr3 calorimeters to produce a prototype Compton telescope.
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Author(s): Richard S. Woolf, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Alexander Moiseev, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Aleksey Bolotnikov, Brookhaven Science Associates (United States); Nicholas Cannady, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Gabriella Carini, Brookhaven Science Associates (United States); John Krizmanic, John Mitchell, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Bernard Phlips, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Makoto Sasaki, Lucas Smith, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Daniel Shy, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); David Thompson, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Eric Yates, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Klaus Ziock, Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States); Andreas Zoglauer, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
22 July 2022 • 13:30 - 13:50 EDT | Room 523
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We describe the prototype instrument for GECCO – the Galactic Explorer with a Coded Aperture Mask and Compton Telescope. ProtoGECCO is comprised of two main imaging calorimeters. The top calorimeter is an array of CZT that uses a virtual Frisch grid for 3-d positional sensitivity over an energy range of 50 keV – 10 MeV. Below the CZT is an array of GAGG fingers readout by SiPMs on each end. The calorimeters are surrounded by a CsI shield. ProtoGECCO employs the techniques of both a coded aperture and a Compton telescope. The prototype instrument plans to fly on a high-altitude balloon in 2026 from Fort Sumner, NM. The results of this work will be directly applicable to future space instruments that require detectors with large area; excellent spatial, energy, and angular resolution; and high detection efficiency. Such missions will address problems in the MeV domain of γ-ray astronomy - one of the most underexplored windows on the Universe.
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Author(s): Lisa Ferro, Univ. degli Studi di Ferrara (Italy); Enrico Virgilli, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Miguel Moita, Filippo Frontera, Piero Rosati, Cristiano Guidorzi, Univ. degli Studi di Ferrara (Italy); Claudio Ferrari, Istituto dei Materiali per l'Elettronica ed il Magnetismo, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy); Riccardo Lolli, Univ. degli Studi di Ferrara (Italy); Ezio Caroli, Natalia Auricchio, John Buchan Stephen, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Stefano Squerzanti, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Carmelo Gargano, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Palermo (Italy); Mauro Pucci, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy); Olivier Limousin, CEA-IRFU (France); Stefano Del Sordo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Palermo (Italy); Aline Meuris, CEA-IRFU (France); Philippe Laurent, CEA-IRFU (Italy); Hugo Allaire, CEA-IRFU (France)
22 July 2022 • 13:50 - 14:10 EDT | Room 523
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Many key questions in Hard X-/soft Gamma-ray astronomy (>100 keV) require sensitivity and angular resolution that are hardly achievable with present technologies, so new instruments able to focus hard X and gamma-rays are necessary. Laue lenses based on Bragg’s diffraction in transmission configuration are a possible solution. Here we present the latest results of the TRILL (Technological Readiness Increase for Laue Lenses) project, devoted to the advancement of the technological readiness of Laue lenses: a method for preparing suitable bent Germanium and Silicon crystals and the latest advancements in the crystals alignment technology.
12181-97
Author(s): Peter F. Bloser, W. Thomas Vestrand, Markus Hehlen, Kimberly Katko, Lucas Parker, Darrel Beckman, James Sedillo, Justin McGlown, John Michel, Rory Scobie, Anthony Nelson, Daniel Poulson, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
22 July 2022 • 14:10 - 14:30 EDT | Room 523
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The Mini Astrophysical MeV Background Observatory (MAMBO) is a CubeSat mission designed to make the best-ever measurement of the cosmic diffuse gamma-ray (CDG) background in the MeV energy range. The sensitivity of space-based gamma-ray instruments to the CDG is limited not by size, but by the locally generated instrumental background. Comparatively tiny CubeSat platforms provide a uniquely quiet environment relative to previous gamma-ray science missions. We describe the MAMBO mission’s two key innovations: 1) low instrumental background on a commercial 12U CubeSat platform; and 2) an innovative shielded spectrometer design that simultaneously measures signal and background. We also present the mission concept and the expected scientific return.
12181-98
Author(s): Xin Wu, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland); Nicolas Produit, ISDC Data Ctr. for Astrophysics (Switzerland)
22 July 2022 • 14:30 - 14:50 EDT | Room 523
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The POLAR-2 gamma-ray burst (GRB) polarimetry mission is a follow-up of the successful POLAR mission which has collected data during 6 months on board the Chinese Tiangong-2 spacelab in 2016-2017. From the polarization studies on 14 GRBs, POLAR measured an overall low polarization as well as an unexpected complexity in the time evolution of the polarization during a GRB. These results indicate that measurements with a significantly improved precision are required. Furthermore, with the recent discovery of gravitational waves and their connection to GRBs warrant a high precision GRB polarimeter capable of both providing high precision polarization measurements as well as detecting very weak GRBs. The POLAR-2 polarimeter, based on the same Compton scattering measurement principle as POLAR, but with an extended energy range and an order of magnitude larger overall effective area for polarization events. The instrument, proposed and being developed by a Swiss, Chinese, Polish and German c
12181-99
Author(s): Karla Oñate Melecio, Christopher Bancroft, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Camden Ertley, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Fabian Kislat, Jason Legere, Steve Longworth, Mark McConnell, James Ryan, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States)
22 July 2022 • 14:50 - 15:10 EDT | Room 523
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The Gamma-RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) is a NASA-funded high-altitude scientific balloon experiment. GRAPE is a wide field of view (FoV) Compton polarimeter designed to measure gamma-ray polarization from GRBs over the energy range of 50-500 keV. A new design of the GRAPE instrument is scheduled to fly from Fort Sumner, NM in August 2023. The new design incorporates an assemblage of 245 optically isolated high-Z and low-Z scintillators each read out by individual silicon photomultipliers and arranged in a 3-dimensional (7x7x5) array which provides moderate imaging capabilities. The cuboid design is expected to eliminate optical cross-talk and reduce instrument background using the instrument's imaging capability. A small-scale prototype instrument of the cube design was developed and studied in the lab using simulations and lab measurements of unpolarized sources. The results of these studies are presented here along with an overview of the 7x7x5 flight instrument and mission.
12181-100
Author(s): Yoko Ueda, Daiki Ishi, Yuichiro Ezoe, Kumi Ishikawa, Masaki Numazawa, Aoto Fukushima, Ayata Inagaki, Hiromi Morishita, Luna Sekiguchi, Takatoshi Murakawa, Yukine Tsuji, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Kohei Morishita, Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Kazuhisa Mitsuda, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan); Kazuo Nakajima, Tohoku Univ. (Japan)
22 July 2022 • 15:10 - 15:30 EDT | Room 523
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We are developing a novel Bragg reflection X-ray polarimeter using hot plastic deformation of silicon wafers. The Bragg reflection polarimeter has the advantage of simple principle and high sensitivity but suffers from the disadvantage of a narrow detectable energy band and difficulty to focus incident beam. We have solved these disadvantages by bending a silicon wafer in high temperature. Our polarimeter can have a wide energy band using different angles on the wafer and enable focusing. We have succeeded in measuring X-ray polarization with this method for the first time using the sample made from a 4-inch silicon (100) wafer.
Session PS1: Posters - Ultra Violet
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
12181-101
Author(s): James C. Green, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Ultraviolet spectroscopy is a key element in the multi-wavelength approach to astronomy. Echelle spectroscopy provides high resolution and broad wavelength coverage and is a frequent choice for optical spectroscopy. However, it has limitations when applied to ultraviolet applications, particularly in the far ultraviolet, at wavelengths shortward of the MgF2 cutoff at ~ 1150 Å. I present an approach to provide echelle spectroscopy at these short wavelengths, enabling aberration control with only two optics post-telescope, by using gratings with curved and variable line-space grooves.
12181-102
Author(s): Jared A. Termini, Keri Hoadley, Casey DeRoo, Cecilia Fasano, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Erika Hamden, Jessica Li, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Ultraviolet (UV, 900–2000Å) spectroscopy simultaneously traces the most common elements (e.g., H, He, O, C, N) in many phases, in the form of ionic, atomic, and molecular lines. UV grating spectrometers hence offer unique insights into astrophysical systems and the impacts of their evolution. This work seeks to understand how we might best optimize certain grating designs to determine the ideal grating parameters and electron-beam lithography/potassium hydroxide patterning prescriptions for blazed UV gratings. We present our results for a rough grid in grating-parameter space (blaze angle: 30°–76°, grating period: 100–5000 nm). Future work will explore specific cases that include the nominal grating prescriptions for current (e.g., Hyperion, PolStar, LUVOIR) and future mission designs.
12181-103
Author(s): Robert A. Woodruff, Woodruff Consulting (United States); Stephen E. Kendrick, Kendrick Aerospace Consulting LLC (United States); Tony Hull, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States); Daewook Kim, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Gopal Vasudevan, Advanced Technology Ctr., Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. (United States); Sara Heap, Univ. of Maryland (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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We are developing the design for the Lyman-Ultraviolet (LUV) Imaging Spectrograph, LUVIS to propose for a Small Explorer (SMEX) mission. LUVIS will provide true long slit (6 arc minute) imaging spectroscopic capability with large spectral resolving power, R. Minimizing the number of optical components to the required minimum of three enables large spectral throughput. The design uses a two-mirror Cassegrain Ritchey-Chretien Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), a single optic Rowland-like spectrometer, and a windowless 50 x 127 mm curved Microchannel Plate (MCP). The design is optimized over the 102 to 140 nm spectral range providing spectral imaging at R ~ 20K in a single exposure. Lyman-enhanced Al + LiF mirror and grating coatings with the LiF protected with an atomic layer deposition (ALD) fluoride encapsulating overcoat provide high throughput over that spectral range.
12181-104
Author(s): Mikhail Sachkov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation); Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Boris Shustov, Sergey Sichevsky, Andrey Shugarov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet mission (Spektr-UF, WSO-UV) is an efficient multipurpose orbital observatory for high and low resolution spectroscopy, high sensitivity imaging and slitless spectroscopy in the ultraviolet wavelength range. It will open new opportunities in (exo)planetary science, extragalactic astronomy, stellar astrophysics, and cosmology. The Observatory is based on a complex of scientific instruments including the T-170M telescope (aperture 170 cm), spectrographs and imagers. In the Federal Space Program of Russia for 2016-2025 the launch of the project is scheduled for 2025. We briefly describes the current status of the mission.
12181-105
Author(s): Mikhail Sachkov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation); Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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SING is a small spectrograph payload designed to observe extended sources over a wide field of view in the NUV range from 140 to 270 nm. A long-slit spectrograph such as SING will detect the emission from CIV (154.8/155 nm) and other lines and will track the hot gas, both Galactic and extragalactic, from the interior of galaxy clusters to the cosmic web. SING is accepted to be deployed on the Chinese modular space station (CSS) as part of the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) program for international cooperation for utilization of the CSS for outer-space experiments. We present a status of the instrument in 2022.
12181-106
Author(s): Mikhail Sachkov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation); Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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Spectrum-UV (another name is World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet, WSO-UV) is the next mission in the Spectrum Serie of the Russian Federal Space Program with a launch date 2025. At that time the main all-sky survey by the Spectrum-RG is planned to be finished. In this contribution we will describe the current status of the mission and a planning to implement and enhance the scientific results of Spectrum-RG within Spectrum-UV Core Programme.
12181-107
Author(s): Mikhail Sachkov, Andrey Shugarov, Vladimir Schmagin, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation); Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The advantages of astrophysical UV telescope on the Moon surface and a number of scientific tasks are discussed. The Moon is located outside the main layers of the Earth's geocorona, this reduces the background in UV, which gives an advantage over telescopes in low Earth orbit; the location of the observatory at the south pole of the Moon, as well as due to the slow rotation of the Moon compared to the Earth, will allow for long-term continuous observations of objects in the part of the celestial sphere visible from the south pole of the Moon, which is an advantage over ground-based and low-orbit telescopes. An approach to build an astronomical telescope at the future International Lunar Research Station is presented. The first small telescopes on the Moon can be considered as the first step towards the development of technologies for using the Moon for astronomical observations. Even a telescope with a relatively small aperture mounted on the Moon will become an effective tool for UV.
12181-108
Author(s): Stephen E. Kendrick, Kendrick Aerospace Consulting LLC (United States); Robert A. Woodruff, Woodruff Consulting (United States); Tony Hull, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States); Daewook Kim, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Gopal Vasudevan, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. (United States); Sara R. Heap, Univ. of Maryland (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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LUVIS accomplishes priority UV science contained in the budget of a SMEX-class mission consisting of a 0.5-m f/24 Cassegrain optical telescope assembly feeding a UV/ far-UV spectrometer. The Lyman UV Imaging Spectrometer has a long 6 arcmin slit enabling spectral imaging and is optimized for 102-142 nm with a resolving power of 20,000 on a Micro-channel Plate detector with a CsI photocathode. The light gathering power is designed to reach galaxies with near-UV fluxes as low as 10-14 erg/s/cm2/Å. The design approach encompasses a simple but elegant optical design, minimum number of reflective surfaces, limited mechanisms, and an orbit minimizing fuel requirements while offering operational advantages. All components are already at a high technology readiness level further reducing technical and cost risk to meet a SMEX budget with healthy cost reserves.
12181-109
Author(s): Tuvia Liran, Yossi Shvartzvald, Ofer Lapid, Sagi Ben-Ami, Eli Waxman, Ehud Netzer, Eran Ofek, Avishay Gal-Yam, Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel); Francesco Zappon, Merlin F. Barschke, Steven Worm, Mikhail Vasilev, Rolf Bühler, David Berge, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany); Vladimir Koifman, Avi Miller, Anatoli Mordakhay, Gadi Lehana, Yosef Lempel, Andrei Levi, Oshrit Ben-David, Tiberiu Galambos, Analog Value Ltd. (Israel); Adi Birman, Amos Fenigstein, Shay Alfassi, Omer Katz, Raz Reshef, Tower Semiconductor Ltd. (Israel)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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ULTRASAT is a spaceborne near UV telescope with high sensitivity and large field of view. The mission, led by the Weizmann Institute of Science and Israel space agency in collaboration with DESY, Germany and NASA, is expected to be launched by 2025. ULTRASAT will revolutionize our understanding of the high energy transient universe, as well as of flaring galactic sources. The ULTRASAT camera, developed by DESY, is based on a custom imager, developed by Analog Value with process and pixel designed by Tower Semiconductor in Israel. The telescope is intended to be launched at 2025 to GEO orbit, and should operate for 7 years. The description of the requirements and target performance, design architecture, process and pixel details and techniques for radiation hardening will be described.
12181-110
Author(s): Binukumar G. Nair, Margarita Safonova, Richa Rai, Bharat Chandra, Shubham Ghatul, Rekhesh Mohan, Shanthi Prabha, Jayant Murthy, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India); Vladimir Shmagin, Mikhail Sachkov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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SING is a near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectrograph that operates in the wavelength range from 1400 ̊A to 2700 ̊A, with a spectral resolution of about 2 ̊A at 2200 ̊A. The spectrograph is intended to map nebulae and other extended objects at moderate spatial and spectral resolution in the NUV from a stable platform of the space station – the Chinese modular space station (CSS). As the event rate in the UV is low, the spectrograph employs a photon-counting detector because of its low noise performance. The instrument has been assembled in the class 1000 cleanroom at the M.G.K Menon Laboratory for Space Sciences. In this work, we will describe the optomechanical assembly procedures we have carried out during the optical alignment and integration of the payload. Opto-mechanical alignment of the instrument was carried out by using an alignment telescope cum autocollimator and ZYGO interferometer. We will also discuss the ground calibration tests performed on the detector and assembled telescop
12181-111
Author(s): Shingo Kameda, Kento Hirabayashi, Masaki Kuwabara, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Alexander Tavrov, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation); Go Murakami, Keigo Enya, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Mikhail Sachkov, Andrey Shugarov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation); Oleg Korablev, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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Many Earth-sized planets have already been discovered and some of them are potentially in the habitable zone. In addition, several Earth-sized planets have been already detected around low temperature stars near the solar system. We performed an optical design of Ultraviolet Spectrograph for Exoplanet (UVSPEX) for World Space Observatory Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) and confirmed that its spectral resolution satisfies the requirement. In this presentation, we show the configuration of UVSPEX instrument and its science objectives.
12181-112
Author(s): Sebastian Diebold, Jürgen Barnstedt, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Bharat Chandra, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India); Lauro Conti, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Shubham Ghatul, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India); Norbert Kappelmann, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Rekhesh Mohan, Jayant Murthy, Binu Nair, Shanti Prabha, Richa Rai, Margarita Safonova, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India); Beate Stelzer, Klaus Werner, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The far ultraviolet (FUV, 91.2 nm to 180 nm) is the wavelength region with the greatest density of absorption and emission lines. However, despite of being one of the most exciting parts of the astrophysical spectrum, FUV missions are rare, partly due to the need for an instrument with a windowless, open-face detector. TINI, the Tuebingen-IIA Nebula Investigator, is a proposed space mission that addresses this unique wavelength range with a 12U imaging spectrograph tailored for observations of diffuse sources like nebulae or the ISM. It features a field-of-view of 0.7° with 13" spatial resolution and a sub-angstrom spectral resolution (resolving power R ~ 2000). The mission is led by the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, where the instrument is developed. The detectors are a contribution by the University of Tübingen. This publication provides a brief overview of the scientific goals, the instrument, and the planned mission concept.
12181-113
Author(s): Melville P. Ulmer, Northwestern Univ. (United States); Jeffrey H. Dugard, Univ. of Central Florida (United States); Daniel Quispe, Donald B. Buchholz, Northwestern Univ. (United States); Steve Stagon, Univ. of North Florida (United States); Yip-Wah Chung, Jian Cao, Konstantina Kritikos, Nicolas Guerra, Northwestern Univ. (United States); Mark T. Stahl, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Ron Shiri, Manuel A. Quijada, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Rajan Vaidyanathan, Univ. of Central Florida (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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There is a confluence of renewed interest in EUV astronomy for exoplanet-related research and CubeSats and SmallSats. This renewal leads us towards designing a normal incidence design of a deployable metal mirror. The mission is based on the desire to measure the EUV load of the host star to their planetary companions. We then describe the concept and work in progress. The basics of return to shape to the shape memory alloy are discussed along with progress in coating and polishing. The possibility of tweaking the figure post-deployment will also be described.
12181-114
Author(s): Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Ernesto Sanchez-Blanco, Optical Development (Spain)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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WSO-UV is the coming mission for ultraviolet (UV) astronomy. The telescope is equipped with instrumentation for imaging and spectroscopy in the 115nm-315nm spectral range. The far UV imager on board WSO-UV will obtain 100 mas angular resolution images from geosynchronous orbit in five bands within the 115nm-175nm spectral range. Additionally, it will be equipped with prisms to obtain slit-less spectroscopy with dispersion ~500 around the relevant spectral lines (Ly-alpha, CII at 134 nm and CIV at 155 nm). A laboratory for vacuum UV optics has been developed in the premises of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid to test the optical performance of the channel. An optical emulator of the WSO-UV beam has been developed to fit within the modular vacuum chamber. An MCP detector with an optical architecture similar to the flight detector has been produced specifically for the tests. In this presentation, we describe the laboratory set-up and the optical emulator developed for the tests.
12181-115
Author(s): Michael A. Velez, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States), Southwest Research Institute (United States); Kurt D. Retherford, Southwest Research Institute (United States), The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States); Vincent Hue, Joshua A. Kammer, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Randy Gladstone, Southwest Research Institute (United States), The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States); Michael W. Davis, Thomas K. Greathouse, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Tracy M. Becker, Southwest Research Institute (United States), The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States); Philippa M. Molyneux, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Shawn M. Brooks, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States); Ujjwal Raut, Southwest Research Institute (United States), The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States); Andrew J. Steffl, Maarten H. Versteeg, Southwest Research Institute (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Ultraviolet spectroscopy is a powerful method used to study planetary surface and atmospheric composition. The next generation of ultraviolet spectrographs (UVS) will perform spectroscopic measurements of Jupiter and its moons in the 2030’s. We have created a detailed UV stellar catalog of over 80,000 targets for several planetary spectroscopy applications. This catalog is built using resources such as SIMBAD, the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) catalog, and Kurucz models for the spectra. We report our methods for producing the catalog and plans to implement it for ongoing and upcoming planetary missions.
12181-116
Author(s): Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Mikhail Sachkov, Boris Shustov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The scientific operation of WSO-UV is managed through three fundamental programs: the core program, the guaranteed time to the funding bodies of the project and the international program. With a launch programmed in October 2025, the calls for the various programs will be issued in the coming years, with the last call being in June 2024. In this contribution, the characteristics of the different programs, the calls schedules will be presented to the community. The results from the first call for the Core program will be presented.
12181-117
Author(s): Ana Inés Gómez de Castro, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Noah Brosch, Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel); Daniela Bettoni, INAF (Italy); Leire Beitia-Antero, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Paul Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); David Valls-Gabaud, Observatoire de Paris (France); Mikhail Sachkov, Institute of Astronomy (Russian Federation)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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Ultraviolet (UV) astronomy was born in the late 1960’s with the advent of space astronomy. Though UV observatories have been scarce, photometric standards are well defined and have been carried over from mission to mission. This scenario is going to change during the next decade with the advent of widely spread cubesat technology. It is expected that plenty of small, cubesat type missions will be flown to run well defined experiments, including survey type probes. In this context, it is necessary to define some common grounds to facilitate comparing and contrasting data from different missions. The “UV astronomy working group” (Division B of the International Astronomical Union-IAU) has defined a set of synthetic photometric bands suitable to be implemented in small missions and that grows on the scientific challenges addressed by using UV astronomical observations. The system has been approved during the last General Assembly of the IAU and will be described in this contribution.
12181-118
Author(s): David J. Sahnow, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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To prolong the life of the FUV channel of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, the positions of the spectra are adjusted by offsetting targets in the cross-dispersion direction. Since 2009, five Lifetime Positions have been used, and a sixth is scheduled to be commissioned in late 2022. In order to understand the effects caused by these offsets, optical models have been constructed to predict the performance of the spectrograph over the range of offsets and grating focus. We will discuss these models and their use with on-orbit data when determining where to locate new Lifetime Positions.
12181-119
Author(s): Javier G. Del Hoyo, Manuel Quijada, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Luis Rodriguez de Marcos, The Catholic Univ. of America (United States)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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Coating development for the ultraviolet/optical/infrared (UVOIR) large telescope was prioritized in the recently released 2020 Decadal survey released by the National Academy of Sciences. The optical thin films group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has recently developed a novel reactive physical vapor deposition (rPVD) process used when growing metal fluoride films providing enhanced material durability and a lower intrinsic wavelength cutoff for each respective material compared to the those grown using conventional PVD processes. We investigate the durability and optical properties of reactive PVD grown films of magnesium fluoride (MgF2), lithium fluoride (LiF), lanthanum tri-fluoride (LaF3), and sodium hexafluoroaluminate (Na3AlF6). The optical constants, material properties, and durability of each material is presented and compared to those films deposited conventionally.
12181-120
Author(s): Michael W. Davis, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Kurt D. Retherford, Southwest Research Institute (United States), The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States); Philippa M. Molyneux, Southwest Research Institute (United States); G. R. Gladstone, Southwest Research Institute (United States), The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio (United States); Noel A. Eloriaga, Rohini S. Giles, Thomas K. Greathouse, Ujjwal Raut, Todd J. Veach, Sue Ferrell, Maarten H. Versteeg, Matthew A. Freeman, Kristian B. Persson, Southwest Research Institute (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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We describe the calibration of the Europa Clipper Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Europa-UVS). Europa-UVS is the sixth in a series of Alice/UVS instruments built by SwRI. Europa-UVS covers 52-204 nm with 0.4 nm spectral resolution over 7.5° with better than 0.25° spatial resolution on-axis. Europa-UVS features three observing modes to improve spatial resolution and obtain solar occultations of Europa. Europa-UVS meets all requirements with margin, and is the first planetary UV spectrograph to feature curved borosilicate microchannel plates. Europa-UVS will search for and characterize the vapor composition of any plumes, and enable mapping of atmospheric vertical structure and composition.
12181-121
Author(s): Gopal Vasudevan, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. (United States); Robert A. Woodruff, Woodruff Consulting (United States); Kirstin Doney, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. (United States); Coralie Neiner, Observatoire de Paris à Meudon, Lab. d'Etudes Spatiales et d'Instrumentation en Astrophysique (France); Roberto Casini, High Altitude Observatory, National Ctr. for Atmospheric Research (United States); Mark T. Sullivan, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. (United States); Paul Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Tony Hull, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States); Alison A. Nordt, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Polstar is proposed as a NASA Medium Explorer (MIDEX) mission, and if selected, will provide time domain high-resolution all-Stokes spectropolarimetry of stars in the far-ultraviolet (122 nm – 200 nm) and lower resolution near UV (180nm – 320 nm) to study interstellar reddening mechanism. The instrument is designed to deliver a spectral resolving power of R ~ 30,000 while measuring all four Stokes parameters to high accuracy (0.001) with a precision ≤ 0.0001. The instrument includes a rotating MgF2 retarder modulator and a fixed MgF2 Wollaston prism analyzer. The two orthogonal polarization analyzer outputs either directly enters a high-resolution echelle spectrograph or is reflected to a prism spectrograph and imaged on to a common detector. This paper outlines the instrument calibration plan to obtain the Mueller matrices and the demodulation matrix for Stokes parameters estimation. and to spectrally calibrate the instrument. Ground support calibration equipment is also described.
12181-122
Author(s): David D. Allred, Brigham Young Univ. (United States); Kenan Fronk, The Univ. of Alabama (United States); Devin M. Lewis, Brigham Young Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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A compelling reason for space-based observatories is imaging far ultraviolet (FUV) wavelengths since these do not penetrate the Earth’s atmosphere. Broadband mirrors for such applications are necessarily aluminum overcoated at the time of deposition with a metal fluoride barrier. Aluminum fluoride is being investigated as such as barrier. There may be many months between fabrication and launch of the completed telescope. While in storage, thin films may degrade depending on the temperature or humidity of the environment. We stored four 30 nm AlF3 on Al bilayer mirrors in a 327 K oven in dry air (276 K dew point) to simulate a “hot” storage room. Multi-angle, spectroscopic ellipsometry has been shown capable of detecting the oxidation of aluminum under a fluoride overcoat at less than one monolayer thickness. Using this tool, we found that there was no significant change in the film thicknesses over a period of 2500 hours.
12181-123
Author(s): James S. Milnes, Scott Harada, Etienne Urbain, Thomas Conneely, Ashley Thomson, Photek Ltd. (United Kingdom); Paul Hink, Photek USA LLC (United States); Jonathan Lapington, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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We present test results of next generation high QE photocathodes appropriate for use in a wide range of FUV and DUV astronomy and remote sensing. A newly developed opaque CsI photocathode deposited on microchannel plates and sealed into vacuum photodetectors with a Magnesium Fluoride input window demonstrates QE of > 16% @ 130 nm. An optimized transmission mode solar blind (SB) alkali-telluride photocathode demonstrates 29% peak QE and 1E3 suppression of NUV and visible light, a significant improvement over previous alkali-telluride photocathodes. Finally, we present data from a new high QE S20 alkali-antimonide photocathode with > 40% QE at 254 nm, suitable for instruments requiring wideband DUV through VIS coverage. Improvements in collection efficiency of vacuum photodetector MCPs from 60% to 90% will also be presented, providing a further 50% boost to detective QE.
12181-124
Author(s): David R. Boris, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Luis V. Rodriguez de Marcos, Javier Del Hoyo, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Virginia D. Wheeler, Scott G. Walton, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Edward J. Wollack, Manuel A. Quijada, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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Recently, a novel passivation procedure based on the exposure of bare Al to fluorine containing plasma has been presented [ L.V. Rodriguez de Marcos et al, Opt. Mater. Express 11, 740-756 (2021)]. This research is framed in a collaboration between Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and the experiments are carried out in the Large Area Plasma Processing System (LAPPS) at NRL using aluminum coated glass samples produced at GSFC coating facilities. The passivation of the oxidized Al is accomplished by using an electron-beam generated plasma produced in a fluorine-containing background to simultaneously remove the native oxide layer while promoting the formation of an AlF3 passivation layer with tunable thickness. Importantly, this new treatment uses benign precursors (SF6) and is performed at room temperature. Details of the plasma process and surface characterization of the passivated mirrors are discussed.
12181-125
Author(s): Robin E. Rodríguez, John Hennessy, April D. Jewell, Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab., Caltech (United States); Parker C. Hinton, Nicholas Kruczek, Brian Fleming, Kevin France, Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Univ. of Colorado Boulder (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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We report on the use of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for the development of metal fluoride thin films relevant to optical coatings operating at far ultraviolet wavelengths. The use of metal fluoride materials like MgF2, AlF3, CaF2, and LiF is relevant to all FUV optical systems. However, many metal fluorides have associated concerns with environmental stability, primarily related to water vapor exposure. In this work, we have conducted a broader study of the moisture sensitivity of ALD materials. This includes ALD of AlF3 mirror coatings capped with ALD MgF2 layers, as well as stand-alone ALD coatings of MgF2, AlF3, CaF2, and LiF subjected to accelerated aging tests and then characterized by FUV reflectance measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy. The observed changes in optical properties, surface morphology, and film composition can provide guidelines on storage conditions for these materials for future space instrumentation.
12181-126
Author(s): Sakya Sinha, Mahesh Burse, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India); Sreejith Padinhatteeri, Manipal Academy of Higher Education (India), Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India); Manoj Varma, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India); A. N. Ramaprakash, D. Tripathi, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India); Anurag Tyagi, U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru (India); Avyarthana Ghosh, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India), Tata Consultancy Services, Ltd. (India); Ghanshyam Kumar, U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru (India); Piyali Ganguly, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India); Reena Yadav, Sankarasubramanian K., U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru (India)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The Solar Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SUIT) is one of the payloads on-board ISRO’s Aditya-L1 mission. The primary scientific objective is to study the early evolution of Solar flares. This paper discusses various algorithms implemented in the FPGA to catch such early events and subsequently track them. The implemented RTL logic processes a large amount of data efficiently with the least possible resources in the least response time. The SUIT is a highly configurable system that allows observers to further tune the on-board algorithm to get the best quality images of the solar events.
12181-127
Author(s): Luc Damé, Mustapha Meftah, LATMOS CNRS University Paris-Saclay (France); Eleanore Fringhian-Rupert, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France); Nicolas Rouanet, Pierre Gilbert, LATMOS CNRS University Paris-Saclay (France); Pierre Etcheto, Jacques Berthon, CNES (France)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment) is a far UV imaging solar telescope (Lyman Alpha, 121.6 nm, Herzberg continuum, 200-242 nm, etc.) of novel design (off-axis telescope with "mushroom type" SiC mirrors) for ultimate thermal stability and long lasting performances over years instead of, often, a few weeks or months in this wavelength range. SUAVE has no entrance window for long and uncompromising observations in the UV (no coatings of mirrors, flux limited to less than 2 solar constants on filters to avoid their degradation), associated with an ultimate thermal control (no central obscuration resulting in limited thermal gradients and easier heat evacuation, focus control, stabilization). Design and performances will be detailed as well as results of thermal/optical tests performed on the SiC primary mirror and its regulated support plate (in SiC also). SUAVE is the main instrument of the Solar/Space Weather/Climate SoSWEET mission.
12181-128
Author(s): Maria Guglielmina Pelizzo, Padovani Marta, CNR - Istituto di Elettronica, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e delle Telecomunicazioni (Italy); Alain Jody Corso, CNR - Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (Italy); Giovanni Santi, Univ. degli Studi di Padova (Italy); Michela C. Uslenghi, Mauro Fiorini, Salvatore Incorvaia, Giorgio Toso, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Edoardo Fabbrica, Marco Carminati, Carlo Ettore Fiorini, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Giulio Favaro, Marco Bazzan, Univ. degli Studi di Padova (Italy); Gianluigi Maggioni, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Giampiero Naletto, Univ. degli Studi di Padova (Italy); Vincenzo Andretta, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte (Italy); Anna Milillo, INAF - Istituto di astrofisica e planetologia spaziali (Italy); Daniele Faccini, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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Spectroscopic observation in the far and extreme ultraviolet (FUV/EUV) region are natively the best technique to probe planets exosphere, but it is also of great interest for solar physics and interstellar medium studies, and it would be particularly suitable to study the Moon environment. It is particularly suitable to determine constituents, to study the atmosphere dynamics, to understand the formation mechanisms and the surface release processes. This remote sensing technique is also particularly indicated to work in synergy with many in-situ measurements, providing a complementary set of data. In particular, in the range between 150-350 nm, the albedo can give additional/complementary information on the geological nature and composition of the planetary surfaces. In particular, using the UV “drop-off”, it is possible to support the search of iron-bearing silicate areas. Moreover, it has been proven that Moon surface albedo measurements in the EUV are useful for ice-detection and th
12181-129
Author(s): Denis Leahy, Joseph Postma, Univ. of Calgary (Canada)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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We have developed UVIT data processing methods and software. Source magnitude extraction is calibrated with respect to a curve of growth analysis. Images require corrections for geometric distortion, flat-field illumination, and spacecraft drift, using the software package CCDLAB (Postma & Leahy 2017, PASP, 159, 158). New astrometry incorporates the Gaia DR2 catalog and a new algorithm for coordinate matching (Postma & Leahy, 2020, PASP, v132, id05403). The CCDLAB software has been upgraded to produce exposure maps for the entire field of view and use new methods for source extraction for crowded fields.
12181-130
Author(s): Denis Leahy, Joseph Postma, Megan Buick, Cameron Leahy, Traian Craiciu, Univ. of Calgary (Canada)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The UVIT instrument on AstroSat carried out a survey of our neighboring Andromeda Galaxy. From the survey, catalogs of point sources have been created. Young stars were detected in the bulge of M31. UVIT counterparts of the X-ray sources in M31 were identified and studied. Clusters from the HST/Pan-Andromeda Hubble Treasury have been characterized using multi-band FUV to IR photometry. FUV variable stars have been identified. The M31 bulge has been characterized in FUV and NUV for the first time, including its structure parameters and star formation history.
12181-131
Author(s): Juan I. Larruquert, Paloma López-Reyes, Nuria Gutiérrez-Luna, Carlos Honrado-Benítez, Álvaro Ríos-Fernández, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain); Luis V. Rodríguez-de Marcos, The Catholic Univ. of America (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The far ultraviolet (FUV, wavelength of 100-200 nm) contains plenty of spectral lines for key targets of astrophysics, solar physics, and atmosphere physics. Imaging at FUV spectral lines like OVI, H Lyman α, NV, OI, and CIV will provide valuable information which has been mostly inaccessible. Such imaging requires narrowband optics. Recent results on FUV narrowband multilayer mirrors at GOLD will be presented: 1. Al/LiF/SiC multilayers, which can be tuned down to 100 nm and at the same time strongly reject H Lyman α. 2. Two fluoride multilayers, such as AlF3/LaF3, which are tunable in the FUV longwards of 120 nm. With these two sets of multilayer coatings, the full FUV can be covered with narrowband multilayers peaked at any FUV wavelength.
12181-241
Author(s): Logan Jensen, John Gamaunt, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Paul Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Matthew Beasley, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Jim Austin, Jim Austin Consulting, LLC (United States); Todd Veach, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Evgenya Shkolnik, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Nathaniel Struebel, AZ Space Technologies LLC (United States); Daniel Jacobs, Judd Bowman, Tahina Ramiaramanantsoa, Arizona State Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) is a 6U CubeSat mission focused on dual channel, SPARCS far-UV (153-171 nm) and near-UV (260-300 nm), photometric monitoring of M-stars to constrain the potential habitability of planets orbiting M-stars. This paper lays out the detailed plan for the SPARCS science payload assembly, integration, and testing (AIT) including the optical calibration and performance measurement methods for the science telescope, thermal vacuum bakeouts for part cleaning, ongoing contamination monitoring methods, and spectral performance measurements of the assembled payload camera. We will provide updates on AIT proceedings at ASU and the SPARCS Thermal Vacuum Chamber (TVAC) test facility built for UV CubeSat missions at Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration.
12181-242
Author(s): Johnathan Gamaunt, Logan Jensen, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Paul Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); David Ardila, Jet Propulsion Lab., NASA (United States); Nathaniel Struebel, AZ Space Technologies, LLC (United States); Tahina Ramiaramanantsoa, Daniel Jacobs, Arizona State Univ. (United States); April D. Jewell, Shouleh Nikzad, Jet Propulsion Lab., NASA (United States); Evgenya Shkolnik, Arizona State Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The Star-Planet Activity Research CubeSat (SPARCS) is a small space telescope tasked with monitoring sunspots and flares of M-type stars in near ultra-violet (NUV) and far-ultraviolet (FUV) wavelengths. The SPARCS instrument is approaching its critical design review (CDR), and the team is moving forward with assembly integration and test (AI&T) plans for the payload and spacecraft. This paper focuses on the SPARCS thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing facility, and thermal testing plan for the payload. The SAPRCS TVAC testing chamber has been developed at Arizona State University (ASU) to provide a clean and relevant thermal environment for the testing of CubeSats and their payloads. The chamber can perform long-duration bake-outs at +80°C and monitor both volatile and condensable contaminants with a thermal quartz crystal microbalance (TQCM) and a residual gas analyzer (RGA). These capabilities allow the SPARCS team to control and monitor the cleanliness of the test environment.
Session PS2: Posters - Solar
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
12181-170
Author(s): William Setterberg, Lindsay Glesener, Demoz Gebre-Egziabher, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); John G. Sample, Montana State Univ. (United States); David M. Smith, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States); Amir Caspi, Southwest Research Institute (United States); Allan Faulkner, Montana State Univ. (United States); Lestat Clemmer, Kate Hildebrandt, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Evan Skinner, Univ. of Minnesota (United States); Annsley Greathouse, Ty Kozic, Meredith Wieber, Mansour Savadogo, Mel Nightingale, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States); Trevor Knuth, Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Debate has been ongoing since the early days of the space age as to how particles are accelerated during solar flares, and one way to probe relevant acceleration mechanisms is by investigating short-timescale (tens of milliseconds) variations in solar flare hard X-ray flux. The Impulsive Phase Rapid Energetic Solar Spectrometer (IMPRESS) CubeSat mission aims to measure these fast hard X-ray variations. In order to produce the best possible science data from this mission, we characterize the IMPRESS scintillator detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo models. We show that the Geant4 Monte Carlo detector model is consistent with an analytical model. We find that Geant4 simulations of X-ray and optical interactions explain observed features in experimental data, but do not completely account for our measured energy resolution. We further show that nonuniform light collection leads to double-peak behavior at the 662 keV 137Cs photopeak and can be corrected in Geant4 models and the lab.
12181-171
CANCELED: Development of a FUV spectrally selective reflective coating for the SMILE UVI instrument
Author(s): Karl Fleury-Frenette, Jérémy Brisbois, Pascal Blain, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium); Jérôme Loicq, Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands), Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium); Frédéric Rabecki, Julien Rosin, Thierry Jaquemart, Fabien Schmutz, Jean-François Vandenrijt, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium); Christian Kintziger, Ctr Spatial de Liège (Belgium)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) is a joint ESA-CNSA mission dedicated to the analysis of the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. The onboard UltraViolet Imager (UVI) will produce images of the earth’s aurorae in the FUV targeting emission lines attributed to the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) band system. A major part of the instrument required spectral selectivity will be provided by four successive reflections upon a dedicated coating applied on the imager mirrors. The coating, developed by CSL, is based on a modified pi-multilayer architecture constituted of several tens of MgF2 and LaF3 layers deposited by ion-assisted electron beam evaporation; it is highly reflective over the 160 nm – 175 nm band with a low out-of-band reflectivity up to the near infrared when applied on fused silica and glass. The coating detailed performance will be presented along with its current space qualification status.
12181-173
Author(s): Anurag Tyagi, U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru, Indian Space Research Organisation (India); Reena Yadav, Ghanshyam Kumar, Vishnu T. S., Navle Sonal G., Satyannarayana Thatimattala S. V., Vivek R. Subramanian, Sankarasubramanian K., U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru (India); Pravin Chordia, Bhushan Joshi, Mahesh Burse, Sakya Sinha, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India); Sreejith Padinhatteeri, Manipal Academy of Higher Education (India); Manoj Varma, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India); Ramaprakash A. N., D. Tripathi, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India); Vanitha M., Nigar Shaji, U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru (India)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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Solar Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SUIT) is one of the payloads, onboard ISRO’s Aditya-L1 satellite. This telescope will image the sun in near-UV wavelength rage (200nm – 400 nm) in high resolution and high cadence. This paper discusses the Details of functional requirements, overall Configuration, design aspects and challenges of inhouse development of SUIT payload electronics. This paper also discusses Hardware design development details, interfaces with external subsystem (external payloads / spacecraft subsystems) and software aspects for some of the onboard and fail-safe operations The brief introduction for important results obtained with Engineering model and flight model of SUIT Electronics are presented.
12181-174
Author(s): Manoj Varma, Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India); Anurag Tyagi, U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru (India); Bhushan Joshi, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India); Sreejith Padinhatteeri, Manipal Academy of Higher Education (India); Ghanshyam Kumar, U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru (India); Sakya Sinha, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India); Reena Yadav, U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru (India); Mahesh Burse, Pravin Chordia, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India); Sankarasubramanian K., U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru (India), Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India), Ctr. of Excellence in Space Sciences India, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata (India); Avyarthana Ghosh, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India), Tata Consultancy Services, Ltd. (India); Durgesh Tripathi, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India); Koushal Vadodariya, Manjunath Olekar, Mohamed Azaruddin, U R Rao Satellite Ctr., Bengaluru (India); Nagaraju K., Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India); Ramaprakash A. N., Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India), Indian Institute of Astrophysics (India); Rushikesh Deogaonkar, Inter-Univ. Ctr. for Astronomy and Astrophysics (India)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The Solar Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (SUIT) is one of the seven payloads in Aditya-L1. One of the primary objectives of SUIT is to study the early evolution of solar flares with high time cadence in Near UV wavelength (200 nm – 400 nm). SUIT has a 4K X 4K CCD detector that takes full disc images of Sun at an angular resolution of 1.4 arc-seconds. This paper discusses the complete test procedure including the test cases and test setup and concludes with the test results.
12181-175
Author(s): Johnathan Gamaunt, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Alfred de Wijn, High Altitude Observatory, National Ctr. for Atmospheric Research (United States); Angelica Berner, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Paul Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Robert A. Woodruff, Woodruff Consulting (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The Solar Transition Region UltraViolet Explorer (STRUVE) is a proposed CubeSat mission with a slit-scanning, full-Stokes spectropolarimeter that will observe the Sun with a spectral range of about 259 to 281 nm. This paper aims to illustrate the flow down of requirements from the mission science objectives to design requirements while also giving an overview of the design developed from the concept study. The derived requirements from the science objectives are the primary functions STRUVE will need to perform to capture the needed data for the mission. The overview of the mission design will delve into the mission operations and give an overview of the STRUVE instrument and spacecraft. Links between the requirements and mission design are made, pointing out how critical requirements are being met. Throughout the paper, trade studies are presented showing the rationale behind many of the critical design choices made in developing STRUVE for the concept study.
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Author(s): Angelica Berner, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Alfred de Wijn, High Altitude Observatory, National Ctr. for Atmospheric Research (United States); Mads Krabbe Jepsen, Space Inventor (Denmark); Paul Scowen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Johnathan Gamaunt, Arizona State Univ. (United States); Robert Woodruff, Woodruff Consulting (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The Solar Transition Region UltraViolet Explorer (STRUVE) is a proposed CubeSat mission to study the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere from the photosphere up to the top of the chromosphere. STRUVE is a full-Stokes spectropolarimeter and observes a region of the near-UV that contains the well-known Mg II h and k lines as well as a number of Fe I and Fe II lines that sample many heights in the atmosphere. In order to accurately determine the magnetic field strength and orientation, STRUVE has sub-arcsecond yaw and pitch pointing stability requirements to suppress crosstalk between Stokes parameters. One of our concept study priorities is addressing the fine pointing requirements to demonstrate mission feasibility. This paper provides an overview of STRUVE and related background, the main sources of jitter and our ADCS solutions. We present studies that provide rationale for pointing system design choices and review tools that have been developed to demonstrate system capabilities.
Session PS3: Posters - Athena
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
12181-177
Author(s): Jonas Reiffers, Sebastian Albrecht, Olaf Hälker, Andreas Lederhuber, Benjamin Mican, Francisco Javier Veredas, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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A preliminary engineering model for the Athena WFI Frame Processing Module has been developed and assembled at MPE. All components were selected in such a way that they meet the requirements for radiation tolerance and are available as space qualified variants. The hardware takes into account mechanical and thermal requirements. This is especially relevant for the FPGA, which has a CCGA package that is susceptible to vibration loads. We present the hardware of the FPM, its capabilities and the current state of development. An outlook for future tests and developments is also presented.
12181-178
Author(s): Francisco Javier Veredas, Sebastian Albrecht, Diogo Coutinho, Andreas Lederhuber, Jonas Reiffers, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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In this paper, we present the timing distribution implementation for the Athena WFI X-ray satellite telescope. We found that the delay from the on-board-computer (OBC) to the Detector Electronics (DE) is one of the major contributors to achieve the WFI required AKE <5µs. Therefore, we present two methods. One uses a pulse-per-second (PPS) signal in combination with a SpaceWire (SpW) network, and the other uses only a SpW network. Absolute Knowledge Error (AKE) <5µs can be reached with the PPS method, meanwhile with the SpW method is unclear. Therefore, the PPS method is the current baseline in the Athena WFI instrument. The clock oscillator used in the DE Frame Processing Module (FPM) presents a frequency deviation problem. To alleviate this problem, a technique has been devised. In summary, this paper shows that it is possible to reach AKE <5µs in the Athena WFI instrument.
12181-179
Author(s): Michael Bonholzer, Robert Andritschke, Valentin Emberger, Günter Hauser, Johannes Müller-Seidlitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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DEPFET pixel detectors operated in drain current read out are affected by drain current inhomogeneities originated in the pixel matrix. In order to cope with this effect in Athena’s WFI, the production of the DEPFET pixel matrixes at the semiconductor laboratory of the Max Planck Society (HLL) was optimized in order to improve pixel homogeneity and to decrease differences in the drain current of individual pixels. We characterized the drain currents of flight-like DEPFET pixel matrices in order to verify the expected positive impact on drain current homogeneity. The electrical parameters, determined in operational conditions, were linked to the spectroscopic performance of individual pixels.
12181-181
Author(s): Johannes Müller-Seidlitz, Robert Andritschke, Michael Bonholzer, Valentin Emberger, Günter Hauser, Maximilian Herrmann, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Peter Lechner, Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (Germany); Julian Oser, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The Wide Field Imager for the Athena X-ray telescope is composed of two back side illuminated detectors using DEPFET sensors operated in rolling shutter readout mode: A large detector array featuring four sensors with 512Ö512 pixels each and a small detector that facilitates the high count rate capability of the WFI for the investigation of bright, point-like sources. Both sensors were fabricated in full size featuring the pixel layout, fabrication technology and readout mode chosen in a preceding prototyping phase. We present the spectroscopic performance of these flight-like detectors for different photon energies in the relevant part of the targeted energy range from 0.2keV to 15keV with respect to the timing requirements of the instrument. For 5.9keV photons generated by an iron-55 source the spectral performance expressed as Full Width at Half Maximum of the emission peak in the spectrum is 126.0eV for the Large Detector and 129.1eV for the Fast Detector.
12181-182
Author(s): Sebastiano Ligori, Leonardo Corcione, Vito Capobianco, Donata Bonino, INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino (Italy); Eduardo Medinaceli Villegas, Luca Valenziano, Natalia Auricchio, Mauro Dadina, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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​In this paper we describe the current development state of the Atena X-IFU Instrument Control Unit and its Application Software. Athena is a ESA Large mission scheduled for launch in the early 2030s, that has reached the Instrument requirement review phase. Not all of the needed functionalities are frozen yet, but the baseline concept and implementation will be described. While the hardware part will be based on well developed solution, some of the software functionalities, in particular the OBCP engine, will need to be developed and qualified. We will describe our approach for development and testing. The X-IFU instrument will use a Spacewire network for communications with the Platform and internally between the ICU and the other subsystems, with the ICU providing the routing capabilities for Housekeeping telemetry and telecommand as well as the scientific data. We will describe some aspects of the implementation of such a network.
12181-183
Author(s): Manuel Gonzalez, Damien Prêle, Si Chen, Florence Ardellier-Desages, Alain Givaudan, Bernard Courty, Sylvie Blin, Ronan Oger, Guy Monier, Stephane Colognes, Damien Pailot, Alexis Coleiro, Peggy Varniere, Astroparticule et Cosmologie, Univ. de Paris, CNRS (France); Andrea Goldwurm, Astroparticule et Cosmologie, Univ. de Paris, CNRS (France), CEA-IRFU (France)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The X-ray integral field unit (X-IFU) is one of the two instruments of ESA's ATHENA space mission. It is a cryogenic X-Ray spectro-imager with an unprecedented 2.5 eV resolution up to 7 keV. We present the development of the demonstrator model of X-IFU's warm front-end electronics (WFEE). X-IFU will have around 2400 cryogenic micro-calorimeters divided into 72 time-division multiplexed channels. The main functions of the WFEE are providing the biasing currents for the detectors and two SQUID stages and to amplify the SQUIDs output signals. Each channel requires 5 current sources and a fully differential low-noise voltage amplifier (LNA). The DACs can be written and read via an I2C bus. The active component of the WFEE is the AwaXe ASIC, which was specifically designed for this project and integrates current DACs and LNAs for two TDM channels. In this paper we will discuss the PCB and mechanical assembly designs of the WFEE demonstrator model in preparation of the ATHENA space mission.
12181-184
Author(s): Si Chen, Damien Prêle, Manuel Gonzalez, Jean Mesquida, Bernard Courty, Astroparticule et Cosmologie (France); Didier Charrier, Lab. de Physique Subatomique et Technologies Associées (France); Jean Lesrel, Sylvie Blin, Guy Monier, Astroparticule et Cosmologie (France)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The X-IFU is one of the two instruments of the ESA ATHENA mission, offering an unprecedented high spectral resolution. In the detection and readout chain of the X-IFU, the first warm stage is the WFEE subsystem. It mainly includes low-noise amplifiers and current sources to read out and bias cryogenic stages. Based on the development experiences of four previous versions of the ASICs dedicated to the WFEE, a new version has been recently developed to transfer analogue functions to a thinner SiGe technology of 130nm. This new ASIC and some representative results will be discussed in this paper.
12181-185
Author(s): Gábor Galgóczi, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic), Eötvös Loránd Univ. (Hungary); Jean-Paul Breuer, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Valentina Fioretti, INAF (Italy); Jakub Zlámal, Brno Univ. of Technology (Czech Republic); Norbert Werner, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Vojtěch Čalkovský, Brno Univ. of Technology (Czech Republic); Ivo Ferreira, Matteo Guainazzi, European Space Agency (Netherlands); Andreas von Kienlin, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Simone Lotti, INAF (Italy); Teresa Mineo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Silvano Molendi, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Emanuele Perinati, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Low-energy protons entering the field of view can increase the residual background of X-ray telescope instruments to a level where observations are barely possible. The detailed CAD model of the magnetic proton diverter and Wide Field Imager (WFI) assembly was imported into Geant4 directly using CADMESH. Protons scattered into the focal plane on inner walls of the WFI assembly were simulated in Geant4. The results of simulation of the residual background for the ATHENA WFI are presented.
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Author(s): Fabio Chiarello, Guido Torrioli, CNR-Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie (Italy); Andrea Argan, Matteo D'Andrea, Claudio Macculi, Luigi Piro, INAF (Italy)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The Athena X-IFU spectrometer is based on a large TES array working in combination with a Cryogenic Anticoincidence detector (CryoAC). The CryoAC trigger logic is based on a sophisticated algorithm, developed to achieve the required trade-off between trigger efficiency and dark count rate, with precise time-tagging and pile-up identification. The algorithm is based on a finite state machine able to identify, in addition to the anticoincidence events, also the saturation of the detector and the unlock of the SQUID readout. In this work we present a description of the algorithm and a study on its performances.
12181-187
Author(s): Valentin Emberger, Michael Bonholzer, Johannes Müller-Seidlitz, Robert Andritschke, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The Wide Field Imager (WFI) of ATHENA is based on DEPFET active pixel sensors produced at the semiconductor laboratory of the Max Planck Society (HLL). The sensor is steered and read out by the SWITCHER and VERITAS ASICs. Prototype detectors with flight like pixel layout are used to study the effect of ionizing radiation on the ASICs and the properties of the pixels. Testing in our own laboratory with an X-ray source allows irradiation at the specified operation conditions as well as monitoring the performance during irradiation and annealing. We describe the test setup, procedure and results of the Total Ionizing Dose (TID) test.
12181-188
Author(s): Jean-Paul Breuer, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Gábor Galgóczi, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic), Eötvös Loránd Univ. (Hungary); Valentina Fioretti, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Jakub Zlámal, Brno Univ. of Technology (Czech Republic); Norbert Werner, Masaryk Univ. (Czech Republic); Giovanni Santin, Nathalie Boudin, Ivo Ferreira, Matteo Guainazzi, European Space Agency (France); Andreas von Kienlin, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Simone Lotti, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Teresa Mineo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Silvano Molendi, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Palermo (Italy); Emanuele Perinati, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The ATHENA Charged Particle Diverter will magnetically deflect protons away from the Field of View of the Wide Field Imager (WFI) and X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) detectors, theoretically removing the low energy proton contamination from the background; however, what happens to these deflected protons after they hit the wall of the satellite and the role that the surface roughness plays is not yet well understood. We present the results of experiments and validate Geant4 simulations using high resolution 3D surface roughness models taken from measurements to study the effect of micro-roughness on proton energy and scattering efficiency.
12181-190
Author(s): Florent Castellani, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Sophie Beaumont, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); François Pajot, Gilles Roudil, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Joseph S. Adams, Simon R. Bandler, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Christophe Daniel, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); James A. Chervenak, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Edward V. Denison, William B. Doriese, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Michel Dupieux, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Malcolm Durkin, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Hervé Geoffray, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Gene C. Hilton, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); David Murat, Yann Parot, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Philippe Peille, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Damien Prêle, Astroparticule et Cosmologie (France); Laurent Ravera, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Carl D. Reintsema, Robert W. Stevens, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Kazuhiro Sakai, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Joel N. Ullom, Leila R. Vale, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States); Nicholas A. Wakeham, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Ctr. for Space Sciences and Technology, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The X-IFU (X-ray Integral Field Unit) is a cryogenic X-ray imaging spectrometer operating at 55mK. It will provide unprecedented spatially resolved high-resolution spectroscopy (2.5 eV FWHM up to 7 keV) in the 0.2-12 keV energy range thanks to its array of TES (Transition Edge Sensors) microcalorimeters. The detection chain of the instrument is developed by an international collaboration: the detector array by NASA GSFC, the cold electronics by NIST, the cold amplifier by VTT, the WFEE (Warm Front-End Electronics) by APC and the DRE (Digital Readout Electronics) by IRAP. To assess the operation of the complete readout chain of the X-IFU, a 50mK test bench has been developed at IRAP in collaboration with CNES. Validation of the test bench has been done with an intermediate detection chain entirely from NIST and Goddard. Next planned activities include the integration of DRE and WFEE prototypes in order to perform an end-to-end demonstration of a complete X-IFU detection chain.
12181-191
Author(s): Maria Teresa Ceballos, Instituto de Física de Cantabria, Univ. de Cantabria (Spain); Nicolás Cardiel, Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Beatriz Cobo, Instituto de Física de Cantabria, Univ. de Cantabria (Spain); Philippe Peille, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Stephen J. Smith, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Michael C. Witthoeft, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / ADNET Systems, Inc, Bethesda, MD (United States); Malcolm S. Durkin, National Institute of Standards and Technology (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The raw current pulses generated by X-ray photons impacting the Athena/X-IFU TES detectors will be reconstructed onboard to retrieve their energy, arrival time and sky position. For this purpose the current baseline technique is the optimal filtering, an algorithm which presents the very good compromise between computational resources and energy resolution. This is also the algorithm typically used to reconstruct most TES lab data. We have studied the application of a variation of the optimal filtering technique, consisting in a truncation of the full length filter in time domain to reconstruct laboratory data (Mn Kalpha fluorescence photons measured by TES detectors, both at GSFC and NIST) already tested with a reconstruction done using the full length filter. The comparison of the results of both approaches showed that the use of the truncated variant (with half as long filters) provides comparable (or even better) resolutions to the full filters.
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CANCELED: Effects of spatial inhomogeneities in Athena/X-IFU optical and thermal filters investigated by numerical analysis
Author(s): Ugo Lo Cicero, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Elena Puccio, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Teresa Mineo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Palermo (Italy); Marco Barbera, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The optical and thermal filters of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) instrument on board the ESA astrophysics space mission Athena are subject to strict spatial uniformity requirements to minimize the modulation induced on the X-ray radiation transmitted toward the detector. We evaluate the effect of local differences in the membrane thickness and of a supporting metal mesh on the overall image uniformity. For each filter, the signal toward the detector is the product of its transmittance and the telescope Point Spread Function (PSF). Within the PSF area, there is an averaging effect, depending on the ratio between this area and the inhomogeneities scale. A numerical analysis assessed the maximum tolerable variation of the transmittance, averaged within the PSF, as a function of its position on the filter, assuming inhomogeneity patterns with different spatial scales. The effect of the filter supporting meshes on the focal plane image uniformity is also evaluated.
12181-193
Author(s): Roland H. den Hartog, Damian Audley, Emanuele Taralli, Henk van Weers, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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This paper describes the thermal characterization of the Development Model (DM) of the X ray Integral Field Unit Focal Plane Assembly (X-IFU FPA) for the Athena X-ray observatory. We discuss the requirements on the thermal aspects of the FPA, and compare these with the results of a series of measurements made with the thermal model of the FPA DM (DM-TH): thermal stability, heat loads, thermal capacity, conductance and time constants of the temperature stages in the FPA.
12181-194
Author(s): Roland H. den Hartog, Emanuele Taralli, Damian Audley, Henk van Weers, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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This paper describes the thermal characterization of the Development Model (DM) of the X ray Integral Field Unit Focal Plane Assembly (X-IFU FPA) for the Athena X-ray observatory. We present measurements on the functional and performance model of the FPA (DM-FP) which demonstrate that the FPA is indeed capable of providing the right environment for the required sensor performance.
12181-195
Author(s): Manuel Abreu, Alexandre Cabral, José Manuel Rebordão, Nuno M. Gonçalves, Univ. de Lisboa (Portugal); Sergio Mottini, Thales Alenia Space (Italy); João Costa Pinto, Evoleo Technologies (Portugal); David Silva, FHP (Portugal); José Afonso, Israel Matute, Univ. de Lisboa (Portugal); Davide Oddenino, ESA-ESTEC (Netherlands)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena) is a ESA X-ray observatory mission to address the Hot and Energetic Universe theme. The instrument consists of a single x-ray telescope, supported by a large area mirror, and two instruments, the Wide Field Imager (WFI) and the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU). The switching of the focus between the two instruments is achieved by a large hexapod structure supporting the mirror. In order to verify the alignment with each of the detectors, the telescope shall be supported by an On-board Metrology (OBM) that is able to estimate the pointing with accuracy better than 0.25 arcsec. The OBM solution presented in this paper is based on the concept of a projective metrology where a pattern of active fiducials is projected onto an array detector. The position and orientation of the imaged pattern with respect to calibrated reference points, will allow obtaining an estimate of the mirror pointing absolute knowledge error.
Session PS4: Posters - Athena Optics
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
12181-196
Author(s): Daniele Spiga, Giorgia Sironi, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Desiree Della Monica Ferreira, DTU Space, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Research and Technology Ctr., European Space Agency (Netherlands); Erik Bergbäck Knudsen, DTU Fysik, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Ivo Ferreira, European Space Research and Technology Ctr., European Space Agency (Netherlands); Arne S. Jegers, DTU Space, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Alberto Moretti, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Just like in any other X-ray telescope, stray light is expected to be a potential issue for the Athena X-ray telescope, with a significant impact on the scientific goals. The most prominent cause of stray light in Wolter-I type optics is represented by rays that did not undergo double reflection and were reflected only singly, on either the parabolic or the hyperbolic segment. While ray-tracing is a standard and well-assessed tool to perform this task, it usually takes a considerable amount of computation time to trace a number rays sufficient to reach an appropriate statistical significance. In contrast, approaching the stray light from the analytical viewpoint takes several upsides: it is faster than ray-tracing, does not suffer from any statistical uncertainties, and allows one to better understand the role of the parameters at play. In this paper, we show how the analytical approach can be adopted to model the stray light effective area in the Athena X-ray mirror assembly.
12181-198
Author(s): Alberto Moretti, INAF (Italy); Daniele Spiga, Stefano Basso, Giorgia Sironi, Mauro Ghigo, Vincenzo Cotroneo, Giovanni Pareschi, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, Marta Civitani, Nicola La Palombara, Michela Uslenghi, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (Italy); Giuseppe Valsecchi, Fabio Zocchi, Fabio Marioni, Dervis Vernani, Media Lario S.r.l. (Italy); Giancarlo Parodi, Matteo Ottolini, BCV Progetti S.r.l. (Italy); Massimiliano Tordi, EIE S.r.l. (Italy); Simone De Lorenzi, EIE Group S.r.l. (Italy); Franco Amisano, GP Advanced Projects S.r.l. (Italy); Marcos Bavdaz, Ivo Ferreira, Paolo Corradi, European Space Agency (Netherlands)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The ground calibration of the ATHENA mirror assembly raises significant difficulties due to its unprecedented size, mass and focal length. The VERT-X project aims at developing an innovative calibration system which will be able to accomplish to this extremely challenging task. The design is based on a 25 cm2 parallel beam produced by an X-ray source positioned in the focus of a highly performing collimator; in order to cover the whole mirror, the beam will be accurately moved by a raster-scan with the capability to tilt up to 3 degrees in order to test the off-axis performance and out of field stray-light. The VERT-X project, started in January 2018, is financed by ESA and conducted by a consortium that includes INAF, EIE, Media Lario, GPAP, and BCV Progetti. This paper presents the current status of the development and manufacturing of the most critical systems of the facility, namely the raster-scan mechanism and the source-collimator assembly.
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CANCELED: Design and analysis of mechanical ground support equipment for the calibration of ATHENA at XRCF
Author(s): Elias Breunig, Shaunak Desai, Breunig Aerospace (Germany); Kristin C. Madsen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore (United States); Vadim Burwitz, Josef Eder, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Peter Burger, AlpinaTec Technical Products GmbH (Austria)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
12181-200
Author(s): Stefano Basso, Bianca Salmaso, Mauro Ghigo, Daniele Spiga, Gabriele Vecchi, Giorgia Sironi, Vincenzo Cotroneo, Paolo Conconi, Edoardo Redaelli, Andrea Bianco, Giovanni Pareschi, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Davide Sisana, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Carlo Pelliciari, Istituto d'Istruzione Superiore Bachelet (Italy); Mauro Fiorini, Salvatore Incorvaia, Michela Uslenghi, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Lorenzo Paoletti, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy); Claudio Ferrari, Sara Beretta, Andrea Zappettini, Istituto dei Materiali per l'Elettronica ed il Magnetismo, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy); Manuel S. del Rio, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (France); Giancarlo Parodi, BCV Progetti S.r.l. (Italy); Vadim Burwitz, Surangkhana Rukdee, Gisela Hartner, Thomas Müller, Thomas Schmidt, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Andreas Langmeier, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Desiree D. M. Ferreira, Sonny Massahi, Nis C. Gellert, Finn E. Christensen, DTU Space (Denmark); Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Research and Technology Ctr., European Space Agency (Netherlands); Ivo Ferreira, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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BEaTriX (Beam Expander Testing X-ray) is the compact X-ray facility being implemented at INAF for the acceptance tests of the ATHENA Silicon Pore Optics Mirror Modules (MM) working at the two energies of 1.49 and 4.51 keV. It adopts an innovative design based on collimating mirrors and Bragg crystals in proper configuration to provide a large and parallel beam. The 4.5 keV line (170 mm x 60 mm size) has been calibrated and characterized in several aspects, such as the intensity, uniformity, divergence and stability. This paper traces the path taken for the best-achieved alignment of the different optical components, from the preliminary phases to the final step using a combination of optical and mechanical tools: laser tracker, micro-alignment telescope (MAT), 3D measuring machine (CMM) and self-designed holed plates. The final characterization of the X-ray beam is presented.
12181-202
Author(s): Kristin K. Madsen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Wayne Baumgartner, Jeffrey Kegley, Ernest Wright, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Elias Breunig, Max-Planck-Institute (Germany); Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut (Germany); Ivo Ferreira, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands); Andrew Ptak, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The X-ray and Cryogenic Facility is the baseline X-ray performance verification and calibration facility for the mirror demonstrator (MAMD), the qualification module (QM), and the flight module (FM) of the ATHENA ESA L-class mission. The ATHENA mirror will be the largest X-ray optic ever built, and due to its size and segmented nature it can only be partially illuminated during testing and calibration. Here we explore what this means for the method and procedure to align the mirror and obtain the effective area, point spread function, and focal length at the XRCF with raytracing and simulation. We will discuss the effects of gravity on such a large and heavy mirror, and investigate the challenge of stitching results together from different sectors due to sub-aperture illumination.
12181-203
Author(s): Sonny Massahi, Desiree Ferreira, Finn Christensen, Nis Gellert, Sara Svendsen, Arne 'S Jegers, DTU Space (Denmark); Max Collon, Boris Landgraf, Aniket Thete, cosine measurement systems (Netherlands); Ivo Ferreira, Marcos Bavdaz, Brian Shortt, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands); Waldemar Schönberger, Axel Langer, VON ARDENNE GmbH (Germany); Michael Krumrey, Christian Gollwitzer, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Laboratory at BESSY II (Germany)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The thin film deposition technology for fabrication of the mirror optics for the Advanced Telescope for High- Energy Astrophysics (ATHENA) has been established. Numerous coating process parameters impact the quality of the thin films. Defining a margin within the coating process parameter space, where the deposited thin film performs similar in X-ray reflectivity is key to avoid unforeseen risks within the coating process for the ATHENA flight optics production. In this work, we investigate the coating process parameter influence on the thin film properties with a focus on micro roughness, deposition rate and residual film stress when deposited under various process conditions. The thin films were produced by varying the following three coating process parameters: discharge power, discharge voltage and working gas pressure.
12181-204
CANCELED: Determination of aluminum oxide stoichiometry and estimation of the amount of adventitious water molecules on polyimide/aluminum filters for Athena.
Author(s): Michela Todaro, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Luisa Sciortino, Univ. degli studi di Palermo (Italy); Ugo Lo Cicero, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Elena Puccio, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Elena Magnano, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy), Univ. of Johannesburg (South Africa); Igor Pis, Silvia Nappini, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy); Marco Barbera, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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Athena is a large class space mission approved in the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. The unrivaled capabilities of the latest generation of X-ray detectors on board of the telescope requires the use of optical blocking filters, made of polyimide/aluminum thin layers, which have to satisfy very strict requirements. A deep knowledge of the materials the thin filters are made of is mandatory to guarantee the high performance of the instruments. Through an X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) experimental campaign, it was possible to determine the effective stoichiometry of aluminum oxide, by analyzing the O 1s and Al 2p peaks at different kinetic energies of the outgoing photoelectron at different depths from the surface and to estimate the amount of adventitious water molecules on the Al oxide surface.
12181-205
Author(s): Marco Barbera, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Ugo Lo Cicero, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Luisa Sciortino, Univ. degli studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Michela Todaro, Elena Puccio, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Fabio D'Anca, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Nicola Montinaro, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Salvatore Varisco, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Pekka Törmä, Lauri Riuttanen, AMETEK Finland Oy (Finland); Ilkka Varjos, Bjorn Mikladal, Canatu Oy (Finland); Elena Magnano, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy), Univ. of Johannesburg (South Africa); Igor Pis, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy); Christian Gollwitzer, Evelyn Handick, Michael Krumrey, Christian Laubis, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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In this paper, we present the first results from an investigation performed on nanometric thin pellicles based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) of potential interest for manufacturing large area optical blocking filters to protect soft X-ray detectors in astrophysics space missions. In order to evaluate the effective capability of such materials to block UV/VIS/IR radiation, while being highly transparent in the soft X-rays and strong enough to withstand the severe launch stresses, we have performed a suite of characterization measurements. These include: UV/VIS/IR and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy on bare and Al coated small self-standing pellicles; static mechanical tests on small freestanding samples.
12181-206
Author(s): A. 'S Jegers, D. D. M. Ferreira, E. B. Knudsen, S. Massahi, S. Svendsen, N. C. Gellert, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); G. Sironi, D. Spiga, INAF - IASF Milano (Italy); I. Ferreira, M. Bavdaz, European Space Agency (Netherlands); K. K. Madsen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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This paper presents a study of the angular resolution of Athena, using several candidate variants of mirror curvature and wedging. Results were achieved by ray-tracing these variants of Athena's optics with the ray-tracing software SPORT. The study shows that all polynomial variants yield a PSF below 1" on-axis, at all energies between 0.1 and 12 keV. The secondary-only polynomial variants perform best, for both on- and off-axis point sources. Of these variants, the wedging 0/2 variant is shown to generally yield superior angular resolution at higher energies, the -1/1 variant at lower energies. This analysis indicates the angular resolution of all polynomial variants to be below 1", at all but the highest energies. It also shows, though to a lesser extent, that the secondary-only polynomial variants perform best in most circumstances. Nevertheless, this second analysis requires further investigation for a more conclusive outcome.
Session PS5: Posters - Optics
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
12181-207
Author(s): Daniele Spiga, Giorgia Sironi, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Desiree Della Monica Ferreira, Arne S. Jegers, Erik Bergbäck Knudsen, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Ivo Ferreira, Marcos Bavdaz, European Space Agency (Netherlands)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Silicon pore optics (SPO) are the technology selected for the assembly of the mirror module of the ATHENA X-ray telescope. Due to the small pore size (a few mm2), aperture diffraction effects in X-rays are small, but not totally negligible to the angular resolutions at play. In contrast, diffraction effects are the dominant term in the UV light illumination that will be used to co-align the 600 mirror modules of ATHENA to a common focus. For this reason, diffractive effects need to be properly modeled, and this constitutes a specific task of the ESA-led SImPOSIUM (SIlicon Pore Optic SImUlation and Modelling) project, involving INAF-Brera and DTU. In this context, a specific software tool (SWORDS: SoftWare fOR Diffraction of Silicon pore optics) has been developed to the end of simulating diffraction effects in SPO mirror modules. This approach also allows the user to effectively predict the effects of various imperfections (figure errors, misalignments) in a self-consistent way.
12181-208
Author(s): Nis Christian . Gellert, Sonny Massahi, Desiree Della Monica Ferreira, Finn E. Christensen, Sara Svendsen, Arne S. Jegers, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Kristin Madsen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (United States), University of Maryland (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Nanometer-thin multilayer coatings can enable high performance of focusing X-ray telescopes to energies up to 200 keV and beyond. In this paper we discuss the multilayer parameters and their limitations necessary for the reflection of hard X-ray photons. We present several multilayer coating designs that are optimized with a Differential Evolution algorithm to perform a stochastic global search of the multi-parametric model space. The coating designs are based on the new specifications of the HEX-P mission geometry, optimizing within the energy range 60 keV - 200 keV. We compare the simulated reflectivity spectrums of Ni/Si, Pt/Si and W/Si, at different incident angles. We find the effective upper limit of bilayers in the multilayer stack, beyond which reflectivity will not be increased. We discus a hybrid multilayer coating design, consisting of either a Pt/Si or W/Si multilayer with a top Ni/Si multilayer.
12181-209
Author(s): Casey T. DeRoo, Cecilia Fasano, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Randall L. McEntaffer, Fabien Grise, Jake A. McCoy, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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High energy grating spectrometers with high spectral resolution and effective area would make key scientific contributions. Gratings with fully-customizable attributes – period, substrate curvature, groove orientation, and blaze angle – are an enabling technology for new spectrometer designs, facilitating both aberration-control for high resolution and substantial throughput. Such gratings are an essential technology for several proposed high-resolution spectroscopy instruments, but require further study. We report on progress making such customized gratings using electron-beam lithography, a technique which rasters an accelerated beam of electrons to pattern photoresist. We summarize recent measurements assessing the limiting spectral resolution of flat, EBL-patterned gratings using interferometric techniques, and discuss the path forward for making and measuring the performance of curved gratings with aberration-correcting patterns.
12181-210
Author(s): Cecilia R. Fasano, Casey DeRoo, Keri Hoadley, The Univ. of Iowa (United States); Fabien Grise, Randall McEntaffer, Jake McCoy, Pennsylvania State University (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Encoded in far-UV and soft-X-ray spectra is information about the atmospheric compositions of planets and signposts of habitability, stellar life cycles, and energetic processes of the early universe. These science goals require data which is highly spectrally resolved thus the next generation of UV/X-ray spectrographs will require excellent sensitivity while maintaining high spectral resolution. For these reasons, gratings remain a high-priority technology for development. Advancements made in X-ray grating fabrication have demonstrated electron beam lithography (EBL) in combination with potassium hydroxide (KOH) wet-etching is a promising technique for fabricating efficient, high-resolution diffraction gratings, while nanoimprint lithography (NIL) may be a cost-effective way to realize the quantities of gratings needed for flight. We report our progress fabricating gratings using these techniques at the University of Iowa Materials Analysis, Testing, and Fabrication (MATFab) Facility
12181-211
Author(s): Catriana K. Paw U., Brian Walsh, Boston Univ. (United States); K. D. Kuntz, Rousseau Nutter, Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Cadin Connor, Samantha Busk, Boston Univ. (United States); Vadim Burwitz, Gisela Hartner, Thomas Müller, Surangkhana Rukdee, Thomas Schmidt, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (Germany); Emil Atz, Boston Univ. (United States); Norman Dobson, Dennis Chornay, Frederick S. Porter, Kenneth Simms, Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Van Naldoza, Boston Univ. (United States); Steven Sembay, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom); David G. Sibeck, Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Nick Thomas, Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The Lunar Environment heliospheric X-ray Imager (LEXI) is a wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager built to monitor the shape and motion of Earth's magnetopause over multiple days. Set to land on the lunar surface as part of NASA's Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) program, LEXI will measure soft X-rays (0.1-2 keV) produced by the charge exchange between the solar wind and neutral atoms in the near-earth environment. LEXI focuses X-rays in its 9.1 degree by 9.1 degree field of view using a tiled 3 by 3 array of “lobster-eye” micropore optics (MPOs). LEXI’s MPOs were first tested individually with a short range X-ray source to select the best MPOs for flight, then assembled into LEXI's flight array and tested in the PANTER X-ray beamline facility at multiple energies to determine the array’s point spread function and effective area. We present preliminary calibration results of LEXI's individual MPO elements and assembled MPO array to qualify the instrument optics for flight.
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Author(s): Peter M. Solly, Michael Biskach, Kai-Wing Chan, James Mazzarella, Ryan McClelland, Raul Riveros, Timo Saha, Will Zhang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The construction of X-ray telescopes that exhibit both high resolution and a low mass to effective area ratio poses many unique challenges. As the development of lightweight silicon X-ray mirrors approaches sub-arc-second resolution, previously inconsequential effects and complications must be addressed. This paper will address the structural analysis methods and experimental data that has been collected in attempts to address and resolve these issues for silicon mirror modules. Various parameters are run through tradespace using Finite Element (FE) models and ray trace algorithms in attempts to contribute to the understanding of challenging and extremely sensitive conditions. Results and experimental data are then used to guide the on-going development of optics modules meeting the requirements of ambitious future X-ray missions. In this paper we discuss how the stringent distortion requirements of a high-resolution telescope are combined with launch vibration strength requiremen
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Author(s): Peter M. Solly, Will Zhang, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); David Windt, Reflective X-ray Optics LLC (United States); Youwei Yao, MIT Kavli Institue for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The manufacturing of lightweight silicon X-ray mirrors requires the application of a low stress thin film coating to the optical reflecting surface to achieve high performance. Coating of high-density materials such as iridium, is necessary to increase reflectivity at high energies above 4 keV, but presents many challenges, primarily the large distortions to the thin silicon substrates that occur from these highly stressed layers. Two approaches will be discussed in this paper. First is magnetron sputtering of thin film iridium using Ion Beam Figuring (IBF) of a thick silicon oxide layer on the back surface to compensate the residual stresses. Second is the application of thin coating using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), a process that is uniform at the atomic layer. Results of experiments from both processes will be presented, showing that either process is suitable for future X-ray telescopes, with the ALD process being preferable.
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CANCELED: Mirror alignment and integration for high-resolution astronomical x-ray telescopes
Author(s): Kai-Wing Chan, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); James R. Mazzarella, KBR, Inc. (United States); Michael P. Biskach, William W. Zhang, Timo T. Saha, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Peter M. Solly, KBR, Inc. (United States); Ryan S. McClelland, Raul E. Riveros, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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Continual advances in the fabrication of high precision silicon mirrors makes it possible to build large-area, lightweight, high-resolution x-ray telescopes. At NASA/Goddard, accurately fabricated segmented silicon mirrors are aligned to 1” resolution. Co-alignment of mirror pairs with different radii are demonstrated in integrated mirror modules. The optics’ performance and its stability are tested in soft x-ray. In this paper, we detail current iterations of designs and methods in optical alignment of mirror pairs and their integration into modules. We present recent test results in imaging resolution and module stability.
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Author(s): Hisamitsu Awaki, Ryuta Imamura, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Manabu Ishida, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Masahiro Iwasaki, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Norika Kametani, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University (Japan); Kenshin Kodani, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Yoshitomo Maeda, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hironori Matsumoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Koji Mori, Univ. of Miyazaki (Japan); Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Tsuyoshi Ozaki, Techlab Co.,Ltd. (Japan); Hirofumi Suzuki, Chubu Univ. (Japan); Hiromitsu Takahashi, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Takeshi Tsuru, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Shin Utsunomiya, Techlab Co., Ltd. (Japan)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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CFRP is a composite material composed of carbon fiber and resin. CFRP is commonly applied to the aerospace industry which requires lightweight and intensity. Thanks to superior formability of CFRP, we can form shape of Wolter-1 optics, which consists of paraboloid and hyperboloid, to a monolithic substrate. Since the surface roughness of CFRP substrate is a few microns, it is required to make the smooth surface for reflecting X-rays on the CFRP substrate. We have developed a new method of shaping the reflective surface by pasting thin sheet-glass with 50~100 m thick onto the CFRP substrate. The surface roughness of the thin sheet-glass was measured to about 0.4 nm by Zygo. Our CFRP mirror is a candidate for backup mirrors in the FORCE mission, and are being developed for balloon-borne experiments planned in the near future. Current image quality of our CFRP mirror was measured to be about 60-120 arcsec by illuminating an X-ray pencil beam at the ISAS beam line. In order to achieve a h
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Author(s): Giacomo Rivolta, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Stefano Basso, Marta Civitani, Vincenzo Cotroneo, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Thorsten Döhring, Willy-Leopold Michler, Technische Hochschule Aschaffenburg (Germany); Giovanni Pareschi, Daniele Spiga, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Manfred Stollenwerk, Technische Hochschule Aschaffenburg (Germany)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The optical properties of X-ray mirror samples are commonly measured using diffractometers based on laboratory sources; like the Bede D1 diffractometer operating at INAF-OAB. This instrument can generate a collimated X-ray beam up to 60 keV, even though the most interesting energy region for x-ray astronomy applications is usually below 10 keV. In the softest part of this range (below 6 keV), high X-ray absorption in air hinders a full and precise characterization of optical components. In this work, we present an upgrade of the Bede D1 diffractometer that extends the operative range of the instrument below 6 keV; this is done by maximizing the flux at lowest energies and by reducing absorption by means of a helium-rich atmosphere. The upgraded instrument will be used for the tests of x-ray mirrors with innovative soft X-ray coatings, with potential application to the next generation X-ray telescopes (such as ATHENA and eXTP).
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Author(s): Danielle N. Gurgew, Takashi Okajima, Lawrence G. Olsen, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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Author(s): Ke Yu, Shenyang Ligong Univ. (China), Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Fengqi Li, Shenyang Ligong Univ. (China); Y. J. Yang, Y. Chen, J. Ma, Z. Y. Song, W. C. Jiang, Y. S. Wang, J. W. Zhang, S. H. Wang, D. X. Liu, M. Cong, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Y. P. Xu, H. L. He, Institute of High Energy Physics (China), Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); L. Z. Sheng, Y. Q. Yan, P. F. Qiang, B. S. Zhao, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (China); B. Wang, L. P. Wang, D. L. Wang, F. Ding, J. D. Xue, Q. Y. Liao, Harbin Institute of Technology (China)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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The enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry mission (eXTP) is a science mission designed to study the state of matter under extreme conditions of density, gravity and magnetism. The four payloads onboard are the Spectroscopy Focusing Array (SFA), the Polarimetry Focusing Array (PFA), the Large Area Detector (LAD), the Wide Field Monitor (WFM). Among these payloads, IHEP takes charge of SFA and PFA, there are 13 X-ray telescopes in total, which is designed as nested Wolter I Nickel Gold focusing mirrors, which development is the critical technical research during the Phase A and B study of eXTP. It is a key process to ensure that each mirror shells has similar parameters, such as focal length, angular resolution and reflectivity. During the integration of many mirror shells, testing with a parallel visible light is a fast method to replace that with X-ray in a vacuum chamber. Moreover, the angular resolution and the focal length are mainly concerned in the visible light test. In this pape
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Author(s): Taylor Wood, Fabien Grisé, Jake A. McCoy, Elias G. Papadopoulos, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Randall L. McEntaffer, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Reflection gratings are critical components to successful X-ray telescopes and represent important priorities for future NASA observatories; however, Intrinsic stresses due to coating of reflective thin films on mirrors continue to present challenges and cause deformation leading to degradation of mirror performance. To optimize the optical properties of reflective thin films for X-ray gratings, materials must demonstrate high reflectivity in the soft X-ray regime and have an acceptable level of intrinsic stress. To maximize reflectivity, high Z materials are used for X-ray optics; however, innate absorption lines limit their use over a wide bandpass. Multilayered materials have been shown to mitigate this problem; however, additional work is needed to account for interfacial phenomena, such as stress distribution and interdiffusion. This study presents methods to better characterize stresses of thin reflective films and evaluate reflectance of novel materials.
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Author(s): Erik B. Bergbäck Knudsen, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Desiree D. M. Ferreira, Arne S. Jegers, DTU Space, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark); Peter K. Willendrup, Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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McXtrace is an open source software package for performing any and all X-ray set up. While the kernel was originally designed for terrestrial scattering experiment, in the last few years an add-on module for astronomical applications has been under development, and is now completed to the extent that end-to-end simulation of generic telescope set-ups may be performed. Among the latest technical addition is support for massively parallel GPU-based simulation and grating models for energy resolved studies. We present a variety of the latest studies of complete telescopes on GPUs, and analyze the appropriateness of such technology.
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Author(s): Hayden J. Wisniewski, Ian J. Arnold, The Univ. of Arizona (United States); Ralf K. Heilmann, Mark L. Schattenburg, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Brandon D. Chalifoux, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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The next generation of X-ray telescopes will require mirror segments characterized to 5 nm uncertainty or better. To combat the higher uncertainty of the cylindrical null corrector, we have been developing lateral shift mapping, an absolute metrology technique using a Fizeau interferometer. We have shown in the past our ability to utilize lateral shift mapping to extract flat surfaces to sub-nanometer uncertainties by comparing our results to a three-flat test. We are expanding this method from optical flats to cylindrical surfaces, creating axial shift mapping. We will report on progress toward sub nanometer measurements of cylindrical mirrors using axial shift mapping.
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Author(s): Brandon D. Chalifoux, Ian J. Arnold, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
On demand | Presented live 18 July 2022
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Future high-resolution X-ray telescope will require an assembly process that achieves accuracy needed for science, strength to survive launch, and speed to satisfy mission timelines. Current bonding and alignment processes are either over-constrained for strength but with modest accuracy, or quasi-kinematic for accuracy but with lower strength. We propose an over-constrained approach where spacers have adjustable height. Glass spacers are fabricated using ultrashort pulsed laser-assisted etching, and their length is adjusted using the same laser. We demonstrate mirror stacks assembled using our spacers, and we measure spacer length change to have μm-range and nm-resolution, as required for aligning X-ray mirrors.
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CANCELED: Thin polyimide film on polyimide structural mesh filters for soft X-ray detectors in astrophysics application
Author(s): Fabio D'Anca, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Marco Barbera, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Nicola Montinaro, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Ugo Lo Cicero, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Luisa Sciortino, Univ. degli studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Michela Todaro, Elena Puccio, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Salvatore Varisco, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Pekka T. Törmä, Lauri Riuttanen, AMETEK Finland Oy (Finland); Seppo Nenonen, Oxford Instruments Technologies Oy (Finland); Markku Kainlauri, VTT Technical Research Ctr. of Finland Ltd. (Finland); Michael Krumrey, Christian Laubis, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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In this paper, we present the results of an investigation performed on thin filters consisting of a nanometric thick polyimide film attached to a micrometric thick polyimide mesh. The use of a polymeric mesh allows to increase the mechanical strength of the filters, while offering a degree of X-ray transparency. The technology is of potential interest to manufacture large-area optical blocking filters (OBF) for application in soft X-ray detectors for astrophysics space missions. We briefly describe the filter manufacturing technique and present preliminary results of several mechanical and spectroscopic test campaigns performed on different samples with sizes in the range 1-200 cm2.
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Author(s): Tianxiang Chen, Na Gao, Jiewei Cao, Yupeng Xu, Yong Chen, Huilin He, Fangjun Lu, Institute of High Energy Physics (China)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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CANCELED: Multi-technique investigation of silicon nitride/aluminum membranes as optical blocking filters for high-energy missions.
Author(s): Luisa Sciortino, Univ. degli studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Marco Barbera, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Salvatore Ferruggia Bonura, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Michela Todaro, Elena Puccio, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Fabio D'Anca, Ugo Lo Cicero, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Pekka Törmä, Lauri Riuttanen, AMETEK Finland Oy (Finland); Elena Magnano, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy), Univ. of Johannesburg (South Africa); Silvia Nappini, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy); Emanuele Perinati, Sebastian Diebold, Alejandro Guzman, Chris Tenzer, Institut für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Gianpiero Buscarino, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Christian Gollwitzer, Evelyn Handick, Michael Krumrey, Christian Laubis, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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In this paper, we summarize our experimental activity on the characterization of thin aluminized silicon nitride membranes. In particular, we studied these films as optical blocking filters for high-energy space missions. To this aim, we report the results of a multi-technique characterization of thin Al/SiN/Al membranes to evaluate the X-ray transmission, the rejection of UV, VIS, and IR radiation, the amount of native oxide on the aluminium surface, the morphology of the sample surfaces, the mechanical strength, and the effect of proton irradiation.
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Author(s): Drew M. Miles, Caltech (United States); Fabien Grisé, Randall L. McEntaffer, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
18 July 2022 • 17:30 - 19:00 EDT | Room 516
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In modern X-ray-grating development for astronomical applications, electron-beam lithography has emerged as a primary fabrication approach to producing high-performance reflection gratings for both current and future missions. The work presented here leverages years of development in electron-beam lithography for X-ray gratings to produce a grating pattern that is then blazed with ion-beam etching. The directional ion-beam etching reshapes the groove facets to a triangular profile with an angle specified by the application. A prototype X-ray reflection grating fabricated with a combination of electron-beam lithography and ion-beam etching is presented here, along with diffraction efficiency performance measured across the soft-X-ray bandpass. This first prototype achieves ≈33% absolute diffraction efficiency from 0.2 – 1.2 keV, with an average peak-order efficiency of ≈17%. The fabrication approach, efficiency measurements, and path toward improved performance are presented.
Session PS6: Posters - Ongoing Missions
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
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Author(s): Christian M. Pommranz, Chris Tenzer, Sebastian J. Diebold, Emanuele Perinati, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Michael J. Freyberg, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Andrea Santangelo, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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A new eROSITA mass model was developed for particle background simulations as well as ray-tracing simulations using the Geant4 toolkit. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle background for the filter wheel closed position were performed using the new mass model, which help to find the origin of the fluorescence lines seen in the eROSITA spectrum. The geometry offers an unprecedented level of detail, especially close to the CCD. The mass model is written in the Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) and consists mainly of Geant4 Constructed Solid Geometry (CGS) volumes, which allows for fast simulation runtimes.
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Author(s): Michael J. Freyberg, Thomas Müller, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Emanuele Perinati, Christopher Tenzer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Andrea Merloni, Peter Predehl, Susanne Friedrich, Diogo Coutinho, Konrad Dennerl, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Christian Pommranz, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The X-ray astronomical observatory eROSITA aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite is operational in a halo orbit around the Sun-Earth L2 point since summer 2019. In December 2021 it has completed its 4th (of total planned 8) all-sky survey. Within a few months during the 3rd survey the eROSITA instruments were hit at least 3 times by micro-meteoroids. The dust particles disintegrated and hit the focal plane in form of small fragments. The hits caused permanent lattice structure defects in the bulk silicon, resulting in additional leakage current and brightening of several to many pixels and column segments in the affected CCD. Each of the micrometeoroid events showed different features, which we summarize and compare with parameters like position in space with respect to ecliptic plane, ram angle, etc.
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Author(s): John Rankin, Fabio Muleri, Enrico Costa, Alessandro Di Marco, Sergio Fabiani, Fabio La Monaca, Paolo Soffitta, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Luca Baldini, Univ. di Pisa (Italy); Alberto Manfreda, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Stephen L. O'Dell, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Matteo Perri, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Italy); Simonetta Puccetti, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (Italy); Brian D. Ramsey, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Carmelo Sgrò, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Allyn F. Tennant, Martin C. Weisskopf, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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On December 9, 2021, the Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) observatory was launched, carrying three X-ray polarimeters based upon the Gas Pixel Detector (GPD). These devices measure the photoelectron’s ionization track following absorption of an X-ray, from which the photoelectron’s initial direction (correlated to the polarization position angle) is determined. Here we describe a method for event-by-event correction of pixel-by-pixel gain variations, which are found to be +/-20%, by comparing the charge in each pixel with the average at the same relative position inside tracks of the same shape. Using the large dataset acquired during on-ground calibration of the IXPE detectors, we have individually calibrated each of the 300x352 pixels of each detector's ASIC. We discuss the performance improvements obtained using this method, which may be relevant to other instruments that detect individual events through images.
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Author(s): Alessandro Di Marco, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Allyn F. Tennant, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Fabio La Monaca, Fabio Muleri, John Rankin, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); John Rushing, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); Paolo Soffitta, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Giancarlo Baglioni, Univ. degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata" (Italy); Luca Baldini, Univ. di Pisa (Italy); Enrico Costa, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Kurtis Dietz, The Univ. of Alabama in Huntsville (United States); Sergio Fabiani, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Vittorio Latorre, Ugo Locatelli, Univ. degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata" (Italy); Alberto Manfreda, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Stephen L. O'Dell, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Lawrence Peirson, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology, Stanford Univ. (United States), SLAC National Accelerator Lab. (United States); Martin C. Weisskopf, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer, launched 2021 December 9, will enable meaningful x-ray polarimetry of several types of astronomical sources. Aiming to improve the polarimetric sensitivity of Gas Pixel Detectors, track-reconstruction algorithms based upon machine learning have been proposed in the literature. In particular, a neural-network approach recently developed at Stanford University seems very promising. Here, we describe results obtained using this neural-network approach to analyze IXPE ground calibration data; we then compare those results with results obtained using the current moments-based analysis approach.
Session PS7: Posters - Small Satellites
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
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Author(s): Logan D. Baker, Mitchell J. Wages, Abraham D. Falcone, Daniel M. LaRocca, Gooderham McCormick, Cole R. Armstrong, Tyler B. Anderson, David N. Burrows, Zachary E. Catlin, Joseph M. Colosimo, Seth K. Culbertson, Derek B. Fox, Hannah M. Grzybowski, Evan C. Jennerjahn, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); David M. Palmer, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Lukas R. Stone, Daniel Washington, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The BlackCAT observatory makes use of a 6U CubeSat bus with an X-ray coded aperture telescope payload. BlackCAT, utilizing its wide field of view (0.85 sr), will monitor deep space for gamma-ray bursts, X-ray transients and flaring sources. The payload includes a coded aperture mask and four 550 × 550 pixel Speedster-EXD X-ray Si hybrid CMOS detectors. Both components require thermal isolation and temperature control during operation. We present an overview of the mechanical and thermal payload requirements, as well as design constraints imposed by the 6U CubeSat form factor. We describe the designs used to meet these requirements and present analyses to demonstrate the efficacy of these designs. The mechanical requirements and thermal analysis drive the overall design of the BlackCAT CubeSat to achieve its science goals throughout the mission lifetime.
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Author(s): Joseph M. Colosimo, Abraham D. Falcone, Tyler B. Anderson, Cole R. Armstrong, Logan D. Baker, David N. Burrows, Zachary Catlin, Seth K. Culbertson, Derek B. Fox, Daniel M. LaRocca, Gooderham McCormick, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); David M. Palmer, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States); Mitchell Wages, Daniel Washington, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The BlackCAT CubeSat will monitor the soft X-ray sky, searching for high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), gravitational-wave counterparts, and other high-energy transient events. BlackCAT will utilize a coded aperture mask to localize sources with sub-arcminute precision. We investigate the primary forms of background that will affect this mission and present different methods to suppress these sources, to increase the sensitivity of the mission. Aluminum and polyimide filters will be used to block the optical and extreme ultraviolet backgrounds. Optimization of event thresholds and selection criteria will help to reduce X-ray and particle backgrounds. We discuss the effect of these various sources of background on the sensitivity of BlackCAT to GRBs and other transient events.
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Author(s): Joseph Mangan, David Murphy, Rachel Dunwoody, Maeve Doyle, Alexey Uliyanov, Univ. College Dublin (Ireland); Mike Hibbett, Irish Manufacturing Research (Ireland); Sai Krishna Reddy Akarapu, Jessica Erkal, Gabriel Finneran, Fergal Marshall, Jack Reilly, Lána Salmon, Eoghan Somers, Joseph Thompson, Sarah Walsh, Lorraine Hanlon, David McKeown, William O'Connor, Univ. College Dublin (Ireland); Brian Shortt, European Space Research and Technology Ctr., European Space Agency (Netherlands); Ronan Wall, Sheila McBreen, Univ. College Dublin (Ireland)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The Gamma-Ray Module (GMOD) on EIRSAT-1 (Murphy et al., 2021) is a novel <1U CubeSat compatible instrument for detection of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in low earth orbit. We present a series of tests carried out on the instrument firmware to accurately simulate its performance at rates expected during detection of GRBs. This is achieved by externally forcing triggering of the detector readout mimicking the expected rates for a range of GRB profiles derived from the 4th Fermi GBM catalogue (von Kienlin et al., 2020). This paper will review the test procedure, evaluate the firmware performance and assess future prospects.
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Author(s): João Braga, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (Brazil)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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We present and describe a hard X-ray (30--200 keV) experiment, LECX (``Localizador de Explosoes Cosmicas de Raios X'' -- Locator of X-Ray Cosmic Explosions), that is capable of detecting and localizing within a few degrees bright events like Gamma-Ray Bursts and other explosive phenomena in a 2U-CubeSat platform, at a rate up to ~10 events per year. In the current gravitational wave era of astronomy, a constellation or swarm of small spacecraft carrying instruments such as LECX can be a a very cost-effective way to search for electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave events produced by the coalescence of compact objects.
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Author(s): Hsien-Chieh Shen, Takanori Sakamoto, Motoko Serino, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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X-ray observation covering a wide field of view with a good sensitivity is essential to search for an electromagnetic counterpart of gravitational wave events. A Lobster-eye optics (LEO) and a large area CMOS sensor are good instruments to achieve this goal. Furthermore, thanks to the light weight of LEO, it is possible to install on a small platform such as a CubeSat. However, real-time identification of X-ray events is challenging to perform in the restricted resources. Therefore, we utilize one of the machine learning models of convolutional neural network (CNN) to extract X-ray events in the image taken from a CMOS sensor. Moreover, we use a Sony micro board computer, Spresense, ultra-low power consumption, and supports machine learning libraries for the process. This presentation will introduce our machine learning-based X-ray event selection process targeting to use for a CubeSat.
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Author(s): Benjamin R. Zeiger, Luxel Corp. (United States); Ikuyuki Mitsuishi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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GEO-X (GEOspace X-ray imager) is a 50 kg-class small satellite that will image the global Earth’s magnetosphere in X-rays via solar wind charge exchange emission (Ezoe et al., Proc. of SPIE, 2020). The soft x-ray spectrometer includes a thin film optical blocking filter (OBF) for attenuation of infrared and optical photons. Any non-uniformity in the thin film OBF will be imprinted in the spectral response across GEO-X's large field of view, at best requiring careful calibration and at worst significantly affecting the sensitivity. We present a study of the uniformity of an Al and LUXFilm® polyimide filter with both x-ray absorption spectroscopy and visible light transmission, demonstrating excellent uniformity over a 30mm diameter circular aperture to verify the OBF design for GEO-X.
12181-244
Author(s): Ikuyuki Mitsuishi, Kazuto Kashiwakura, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Yuichiro Ezoe, Kumi Ishikawa, Masaki Numazawa, Sae Sakuda, Daiki Ishi, Aoto Fukushima, Tomoki Uchino, Hiromi Morishita, Yoko Ueda, Ayata Inagaki, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Ben Zeiger, Luxel Corp. (United States)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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We have been developing an optical blocking filter for GEO-X which will perform soft X-ray imaging spectroscopy of Earth’s magnetosphere from aboard a microsatellite. GEO-X will provide an unprecedented view through X-ray observations in terms of the interaction between solar wind and magnetosphere. GEO-X consists of MEMS X-ray mirrors and a focal plane CMOS detector which is sensitive to visible photons necessitating a thin-film optical blocking filter to attenuate noise from out-of-band photons while providing high transmittance for in-band soft X-ray photons. Performance tests, e.g., acoustic testing and X-ray transmission measurements, were conducted and the results satisfy the requirements.
12181-245
Author(s): Masaki Numazawa, Yuichiro Ezoe, Kumi Ishikawa, Daiki Ishi, Aoto Fukushima, Sae Sakuda, Tomoki Uchino, Ayata Inagaki, Hiromi Morishita, Yoko Ueda, Takatoshi Murakawa, Luna Sekiguchi, Yukine Tsuji, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Ikuyuki Mitsuishi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Hiroshi Nakajima, Kanto Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Yoshiaki Kanamori, Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Kohei Morishita, Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Kazuhisa Mitsuda, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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We have been developing an ultra-lightweight Wolter type-I X-ray telescope fabricated with multiple MEMS technologies for GEO-X (GEOspace X-ray imager) which is a 18U CubeSat (~20 kg) to perform soft X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the entire Earth’s magnetosphere from Earth orbit near the Moon. The telescope is our original micropore optics which possess lightness (~15 g), a short focal length (~250 mm), and a wide field-of-view (~5 deg x 5 deg) and can satisfy stringent limits on mass and size. We report on fabrication methods, their optimization, subsequent performances of the telescope, and results of environmental tests.
12181-246
Author(s): James H. Tutt, Ross McCurdy, Randall L. McEntaffer, Bridget O'Meara, Katherine Brooks, Tyler Anderson, Daniel Washington, Joseph Kang, The Pennsylvania State Univ. (United States); Drew M. Miles, Caltech (United States)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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This paper will discuss the design of the camera system being used on tREXS that is based on the Teledyne e2v CIS113-Vega. It will detail the decisions that had to be made in the development of the camera hardware and why these decisions are beneficial to tREXS. Camera characterization and optimization will be discussed, as will the potential for scaling the system to cater for focal planes that require more sensors.
12181-247
Author(s): Scott J. Wolk, Jaesub Hong, Suzanne Romaine, Edward Hertz, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Katja Poppenhaeger, Univ. Potsdam (Germany); Vinay Kashyap, Bradford Wargelin, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Althea Moorhead, Dennis Gallagher, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Lisa Kaltenegger, Cornell Univ. (United States)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The smallsat SEEJ (Structure & Evolution of ExoJupiter Atmospheres; pronounced “siege”) will measure the fluxes of high-energy photons emanating from nearby, planet hosting stars and measure the absorption depth of X-rays in the atmospheres of hot Jupiter analogs. Specifically, the SEEJ investigation will determine the degree to which stellar high-energy photons inflate nearby exoplanet atmospheres and the physical characteristics of driven planetary winds. These science objectives will be accomplished using new, revolutionary optics that provide Chandra-like collecting area in a low-mass, small-volume, and low-cost package and back illuminated X-ray CMOS detectors. The experimental objective is to measure the high energy fluence through monitoring and understand the impact of the high energy fluence by measuring the atmospheres using the X-ray transit technique.
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Author(s): Hatsune Goto, Daisuke Yonetoku, Naoki Ogino, Shuta Takahashi, Makoto Arimoto, Tatsuya Sawano, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Tatehiro Mihara, RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (Japan); Takanori Sakamoto, Jin Li, Aoyama Gakuin Univ. (Japan); Yoshitomo Maeda, Akihiro Doi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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HiZ-GUNDAM is a future satellite mission for gamma-ray burst observations. One of the mission instruments is the wide-field X-ray monitor with a field of view (FoV) of ~0.5 steradian at 0.4–4.0 keV, consisting of Lobster Eye Optics (LEO) and focal-imaging pixel sensors. LEOs need to be spatially well-aligned to achieve both a wide FoV and fine position accuracy. An alignment method is being investigated with visible light and shape measurements. We will report development of the alignment method.
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Author(s): Riccardo Campana, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Giulia Baroni, Univ. degli Studi di Bologna (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Francesco Ceraudo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Giovanni Della Casa, University of Udine (Italy); Giuseppe Dilillo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Alejandro Guzmán, Paul Hedderman, IAAT (Germany); Ezequiel J. Marchesini, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Yuri Evangelista, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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HERMES (High Energy Rapid Modular Ensemble of Satellites) is a space-borne mission based on a constellation of six 3U CubeSats flying in a low-Earth orbit and hosting new miniaturized instruments hosting a hybrid Silicon Drift Detector/GAGG:Ce scintillator photodetector system sensitive to X-rays and gamma-rays. Moreover, the HERMES constellation will operate in conjunction with the Australian-Italian Space Industry Responsive Intelligent Thermal (SpIRIT) 6U CubeSat, that will carry in a Sun-synchronous orbit (SSO) an actively cooled HERMES detector system payload. In this paper, on behalf of the HERMES collaboration, we will discuss the ground calibrations of the first HERMES and SpIRIT flight detectors, outlining the calibration plan, detector performance and characterisation.
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Author(s): Giuseppe Sottile, Francesco Russo, Paolo Nogara, Giovanni La Rosa, Melania Del Santo, INAF - Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (Italy)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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HERMES-TP/SP (High Energy Rapid Modular Ensemble of Satellites Technologic and Scientific Pathfinder) is a spaceborne mission based on a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) constellation of six nano-satellites. The 3U nano-satellites host innovative X-ray detectors. They are dedicated to the monitoring and determination of the position of high energy cosmic transients, such as Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). The HERMES project has been funded by different grants. The HERMES launch is planned in 2023. Here we present, on behalf of the HERMES team, the Back End Electronics (BEE), one of the custom electronic boards of the payload.
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Author(s): Jonathan E. Grindlay, Edo Berger, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); S. Bradley Cenko, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Martin E. Elvis, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Fiona A. Harrison, Caltech (United States); Suvi Tuulia Gezari, Columbia Univ. (United States); Paul J. Green, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Dieter H. Hartmann, Clemson Univ. (United States); Zeljko Ivezic, Univ. of Washington (United States); Mansi M. Kasliwal, Caltech (United States); Alexander S. Kutyrev, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Sarah J. Lipscy, Ball Aerospace (United States); Gary J. Melnick, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); Brian Metzger, Columbia Univ. (United States); George H. Rieke, Steward Observatory (United States); Yue Shen, Univ. of Illinois (United States); Nial Tanvir, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom); Anthony J. Tyson, Univ. of California, Davis (United States); W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Univ. of Pittsburgh (United States)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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Time-domain Astrophysics (TDA) is a major part of current and projected (2020’s) Astrophysics, as recommended by Astro2020. With Rubin/LSST coming on line in 2023, with TDA a prime objective, the deluge of Transients and variables will be astronomical. We describe the Time-domain Spectroscopic Observatory (TSO), a rapid-response (<1 day) 1.5m telescope at L2 that Extremely Large Telescopes on the ground and Flagship missions (JWST and Roman) in space can not achieve. We summarize the novel TSO Science Objectives as described Grindlay+arXiv:1903.07828 and the TSO design and projected cost that is below the NASA $1.5B cap for Probes recommended by Astro2020.
Session PS8: Posters - Missions in Development
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
12181-253
Author(s): Olivier Godet, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The Chinese-French mission SVOM due to be launched in 2023 is the next generation of missions fully dedicated to the survey of the transient sky thanks to an agile spacecraft embarking a multi-wavelength science payload associated with a network of ground robotic nIR/optical telescopes. The SVOM core instrument is the 4–150 keV 2-D coded mask camera ECLAIRs responsible for the autonomous search and trigger of transient events within its field of view. The flight model of ECLAIRs has been built by several French labs (IRAP, CEA, APC) under the supervision of the French Space Agency (CNES). In 2021, intensive on-ground calibration works have been performed on the ECLAIRs camera. Here, we will give an overview of the calibration sequences of the ECLAIRs flight model and we will present highlights of the instrument performances.
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Author(s): Diana Renaud, Axel Arhancet, CEA-Paris-Saclay (France); Francesco Ceraudo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Eric Doumayrou, Luc Dumay, Alain Goetschy, Diego Götz, Tony Lavanant, Michel Lortholary, Isabelle Le Mer, François Nico, Frédéric Pinsard, Marin Prieur, Léna Provost, Nicolas Renault-Tinacci, Benjamin Schneider, Thierry Tourrette, François Visticot, CEA-Paris-Saclay (France); Norbert Meidinger, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany); Karine Mercier, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Aline Meuris, CEA-Paris-Saclay (France)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The Microchannel X-Ray Telescope will be implemented on board the SVOM space mission to observe the X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts in the 0.2-10 keV energy range and localize them within 2 arcmin. The key detection elements are a “lobster eye” X-ray micro-pore optics and a fully depleted pn-CCD. The paper presents the design of the flight camera with a close-up on the detection chain. It will then focus on the technical developments for the spectral characterization of the three flight grades focal planes and for the functional and performance validation of the flight camera, with the associated test results.
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Author(s): Vincent Waegebaert, Roger Pons, Carine Amoros, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, CNRS (France)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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ECLAIRs is a hard X-ray telescope on-board the Sino-French SVOM space mission, sensitive in the 4-150 keV energy range. The camera is made of 6400 Schottky CdTe detectors organized in 200 hybrid matrices of 4x8 pixels, read by low-noise 32-channel ASIC chips. The detectors are polarized at -300 V and cooled at -20°C to minimize the leakage current. We describe the ECLAIRs instrument and the different steps of its integration and testing, with the main results obtained at each level. In the end, we have obtained an homogeneous detection plane with good performance for 6393 detectors out of 6400.
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CANCELED: The ECLAIRs/UGTS scientific trigger and data processing unit onboard the SVOM satellite: status and ground calibration results
Author(s): Stéphane Schanne, CEA-Paris-Saclay (France), CEA-IRFU (France); Nicolas Dagoneau, Pierre Kestener, Hervé Le Provost, Frédéric Château, Camille Tahoulan, François Daly, Shebli Anvar, Charles-Hubert Besson, Lioudmila Klenov, Pier-Francesco Rocci, Bertrand Cordier, Thierry Tourrette, CEA-Paris-Saclay (France); Philippe Guillemot, Marie-Claire Charmeau, Laurent Perraud, Ctr. National d'Études Spatiales (France); Jean-Luc Atteia, Olivier Godet, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France); Hugo Allaire, Benjamin Schneider, Wenjin Xie, CEA-Paris-Saclay (France); Carine Amoros, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (France)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The French-Chinese satellite mission SVOM dedicated to Gamma-Ray Bust (GRB) studies is currently in its final development and test phases. Its 4 on-board instruments observe the sky in gamma-rays, X-rays and visible-band, among which the ECLAIRs coded-mask hard X-ray imager. The onboard Data Processing and Scientific Trigger Unit of ECLAIRs (UGTS) acquires the detected photons to mass-memory and in parallel analyzes them in its trigger software, by coded-mask image deconvolution. It searches for unknown transient point-like sources and produces alert messages for ground-observers and requests spacecraft slews for GRB afterglow follow-up observations with the onboard X-ray and visible telescopes. This paper presents the status of the UGTS flight software and presents performances and first deconvolved source images obtained during the instrument calibration campaigns conducted in 2021 in vacuum-chambers using radioactive sources and an X-ray generator to simulate hard X-ray sources.
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Author(s): Vladimiro Noce, INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (Italy); Salvatore Varisco, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Federico Landini, INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino (Italy); Roberto Candia, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Marco Barbera, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo (Italy); Ugo Lo Cicero, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo (Italy); Fabio Frassetto, CNR - Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (Italy); Luca Zangrilli, Valeria Caracci, Davide Loreggia, INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino (Italy); Alfonso Collura, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Silvano Fineschi, INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino (Italy)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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Helianthus is a phase A study of a space weather station with solar photonic propulsion. The scientific payload will be made of: an X-ray spectrometer to detect solar flares; SailCor, a coronagraph with a wide field of view; a plasma analyzer; a magnetometer. The maximum allowed mass for the entire scientific payload shall not exceed 5 kg. The two imaging devices (coronagraph and X-ray spectrometer) are of fundamental importance for the sake of remotely and timely mapping the status of the Sun and provide Earth stations with early warning of potentially disruptive events. An extensive research on available X-Ray detectors was performed and the Amptek Fast SDD spectrometer. It is a very light and compact instrument, fully vacuum compatible. In order to prove the device readiness for flight, a measurement campaign was organized to investigate its performance in terms of spectral range, spectral resolution, dynamic range and response speed. The campaign was run at the INAF X-ACT facility in Palermo (Italy). This contribution describes the facility, the measurement campaign and the results.
Session PS9: Posters - XRISM
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
12181-261
Author(s): Miki Kurihara, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Masahiro Tsujimoto, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Megan Eckart, Caroline A. Kilbourne, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Frederick Matsuda, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Brian J. McLaughlin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Shugo Oguri, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Frederick S. Porter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yoh Takei, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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Electromagnetic interference (EMI) for low-temperature detectors is a serious concern in many missions. We investigate the EMI caused by the spacecraft components to the x-ray microcalorimeter of the Resolve instrument onboard the X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission (XRISM). We focus on (a) the low-frequency magnetic field generated by the magnetic torquers for the spacecraft attitude control and (b) the radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic field generated by the S and X-band communication from the spacecraft to the ground stations. We executed a series of ground tests both at the instrument and spacecraft-levels using the flight model hardware as well as electromagnetic simulation partially using the Fugaku high-performance computing facility. The magnetic torquers were found to couple strongly with the microcalorimeter, but there is no evidence that the resultant degradation exceeds the noise budget. The RF communication system was found to leave no significant effect.
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Author(s): Efrem Braun, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), ADNET Systems, Inc. (United States); Chris Baluta, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), KBR, Inc. (United States); Trisha F. Doyle, Patricia L. Hall, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Innovim, LLC (United States); Robert S. Hill, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), ADNET Systems, Inc. (United States); Matthew P. Holland, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Michael Loewenstein, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (United States), University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Eric D. Miller, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Michael C. Witthoeft, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), ADNET Systems, Inc. (United States); Tahir Yaqoob, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (United States), University of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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We present XSLIDE (X-Ray Spectral Line IDentifier and Explorer), a graphical user interface that has been designed as a quick-look tool for the upcoming X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission (XRISM). XSLIDE is a simple and user-friendly application that allows for the interactive plotting of spectra from XRISM’s Resolve instrument without requiring the selection of models for forward-fitting. XSLIDE performs common tasks such as rebinning, continuum fitting, automatically detecting lines, assigning detected lines to known atomic transitions, spectral diagnostics, and more. It is expected that XSLIDE will allow XRISM’s scientific investigators to rapidly examine many spectra to find those which contain spectral lines of particular interest, and it will also allow astronomers from outside the field of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy to easily interact with XRISM data.
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Author(s): Takayuki Hayashi, Keisuke Tamura, Rozenn Boissay-Malaquin, Ctr. for Space Sciences and Technology, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Toshiki Sato, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Lawrence Olsen, Richard Koenecke, Wilson Lara, Leor Bleier, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Megan Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Maurice Leutenegger, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Tahir Yaqoob, Ctr. for Space Sciences and Technology, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Meng Chiao, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The X-ray Mirror Assembly (XMA) is the X-ray optical system of the XRISM satellite and its ground calibration is ongoing at the X-ray beamline at NASA's GSFC. A measurement called a spot scan provides us with the variation of local effective area, focal length, image profile, and optical axis across the XMA aperture. By incorporating these variations into a raytracing model, we will acquire an accurate effective area as a function of X-ray energy and incident direction of X-rays.
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Author(s): Misaki Mizumoto, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Masahiro Tsujimoto, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Renata Cumbee, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Yoshitaka Ishisaki, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Caroline A. Kilbourne, Edmund Hodges-Kluck, Maurice A. Leutenegger, Frederick S. Porter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Makoto Sawada, RIKEN (Japan); Yoh Takei, ISAS/JAXA (Japan); Shinya Yamada, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The spectroscopic performance of x-ray instruments can be affected at high count rates. The effects and mitigation in the optical chain, such as x-ray attenuation filters or de-focusing mirrors, are widely discussed, but those in the signal chain are not. Using the \textit{Resolve} x-ray microcalorimeter onboard the XRISM satellite, we discuss the effects observed during high count rate measurements and how these can be modeled. We focus on three instrumental effects that impact performance at high count rate: CPU limit, pile up, and electrical cross talk. High count rate data were obtained during ground testing using the flight model instrument and a calibration x-ray source. A simulated observation of GX 13+1 is presented to illustrate how to estimate these effects based on these models for observation planning. The impact of these effects on high count rate observations is discussed.
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Author(s): Trisha F. Doyle, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Innovim, LLC (United States); Matthew P. Holland, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Robert S. Hill, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), ADNET Systems, Inc. (United States); Tahir Yaqoob, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States); Michael Loewenstein, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States); Eric D. Miller, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Patricia L. Hall, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), Innovim, LLC (United States); Efrem Braun, Efrain C. Perez-Solis, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States), ADNET Systems, Inc. (United States)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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We showcase the data processing pipeline, and the individual software tools available for scientific analysis for the upcoming XRISM mission. Building on the Hitomi framework, The XRISM Science Data Center (SDC) is producing new and improved tools and pipeline products, and constructing a more robust pipeline that reflects changes in the instruments, calibration, and mission parameters. These improvements are supported by interdisciplinary collaboration across the various XRISM hardware and software teams.
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Author(s): Satoshi Eguchi, Fukuoka Univ. (Japan); Makoto Tashiro, Yukikatsu Terada, Saitama Univ. (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hiromitsu Takahashi, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Masayoshi Nobukawa, Nara Univ. of Education (Japan); Tsunefumi Mizuno, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Shin'ichiro Uno, Nihon Fukushi Univ. (Japan); Aya Kubota, Shibaura Institute of Technology (Japan); Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Shin Watanabe, Ryo Iizuka, Rie Sato, Tomokage Yoneyama, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Chris Baluta, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Ken Ebisawa, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Yasushi Fukazawa, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Katsuhiro Hayashi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); So Kato, Satoru Katsuda, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Takao Kitaguchi, Nishina Ctr. for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN (Japan); Hirokazu Odaka, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Masanori Ohno, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Naomi Ota, Nara Women's Univ. (Japan); Minami Sakama, Ryohei Sato, Saitama Univ. (Japan); Megumi Shidatsu, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Yasuharu Sugawara, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Tsubasa Tamba, Atsushi Tanimoto, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Yuichi Terashima, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Yohko Tsuboi, Chuo Univ. (Japan); Nagomi Uchida, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hideki Uchiyama, Shizuoka Univ. (Japan); Shigeo Yamauchi, Nara Women's Univ. (Japan); Masaaki Sakano, Wise Babel Ltd. (United Kingdom); Tessei Yoshida, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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Xappl is a software framework written in Python to build pre-pipelines for the X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission (XRISM) scheduled to be launched in the Japanese fiscal year 2022. Xappl chains software tasks in the order specified in configuration files in the INI format, enabling us to reduce the telemetry data to First FITS Files, which originate datasets ready for analysis. Since the functionalities of Xappl are highly generalized, it is reusable for future missions. In this paper, we present the design of Xappl and report the developmental progress of the pre-pipeline for XRISM.
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Author(s): Tomoki Omama, Masahiro Tsujimoto, The Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies (Japan), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Makoto Sawada, RIKEN (Japan); Caroline A. Kilbourne, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (United States); Cor de Vries, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Yoshitaka Ishisaki, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Shunji Kitamoto, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Maurice A. Leutenegger, Frederick S. Porter, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) (United States); Rob Wolfs, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The Resolve instrument onboard the X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission hosts an x-ray microcalorimeter that consists of 36 pixels in an array operated at 50 mK. X-ray microcalorimeters are known for their high energy resolution and relative timing resolution. Modulated X-ray sources (MXS) are installed in Resolve for energy gain tracking. MXS can be utilized for relative timing calibration, which is known to depend on the pixels, event grades, and energy. We describe the method and the result of the relative timing calibration using data set obtained in a three-day run in 2021 October.
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Author(s): Takashi Hasebe, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Ryuta Imamura, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Masahiro Tsujimoto, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Hisamitsu Awaki, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Meng P. Chiao, National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (United States); Ryuichi Fujimoto, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan); Leslie S. Hartz, Gary A. Sneiderman, National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (United States); Yoh Takei, Susumu Yasuda, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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Resolve is a payload hosting an x-ray microcalorimeter detector operated at 50 mK in the X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission (XRISM). One of the technical concerns is the micro-vibration interference to the sensitive microcalorimeter detector by the spacecraft bus components. We verified this in a series of the ground tests. In the instrument-level test, we tested the flight-model hardware against the interface level by injecting micro-vibration using vibrators and evaluated the instrument response using the 50 mK stage temperature stability, the ADR magnet current consumption rate, and the detector noise spectra. We found the strong responses when injecting micro-vibration at ∼200, 380, and 610 Hz. In the spacecraft-level test, we measured the acceleration and the instrument responses with and without suspending the entire spacecraft. The reaction wheels and the inertial reference units were operated. We found that the observed Resolve responses are within acceptable levels.
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Author(s): Makoto Sawada, RIKEN (Japan); Renata S. Cumbee, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States), NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Cor P. de Vries, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Megan E. Eckart, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States); Ryuichi Fujimoto, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Yoshitaka Ishisaki, Tokyo Metropolitan University (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Caroline A. Kilbourne, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Shunji Kitamoto, Rikkyo Univ. (Japan); Maurice A. Leutenegger, Frederick S. Porter, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Yoh Takei, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Masahiro Tsujimoto, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The Resolve spectrometer on XRISM is required to have an energy resolution of 7 eV FWHM at 6 keV. To achieve this, the in-orbit gain drift will be characterized using pulsed X-rays of the modulated X-ray sources (MXS), allowing us a continuous gain monitoring with a small loss of the observing efficiency. However, there are drawbacks such as additional X-ray background due to afterglow tail photons following each MXS pulse. To minimize these, we have established an analytical model of the MXS count rates and optimized the MXS pulse parameters, which we present in this paper.
Session PS10: Posters - eXTP
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
12181-132
Author(s): José-Luis Gálvez Sánchez, Ander Hormaetxe, Margarita Hernanz, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (Spain); Gonzalo J. Taubmann, Albert Tomàs, Joan Manel Casalta, SENER Aeroespacial S.A. (Spain); Patrícia Ferrés, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (Spain)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The WFM (Wide Field Monitor) instrument of eXTP (Enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry Mission) covers a large fraction of the sky in the (2 - 50) keV energy range, with good angular (5 arcmin - FWHM) and energy (better than 500 eV - FWHM at 6 keV) resolutions. The WFM is distributed in three camera pairs with a broad field of view (180º x 90º FWZR). We present the mechanical design drivers of the camera structure (i.e. coded mask assembly, collimator and detector support plate), the alignment procedure of the detector plane (i.e. the four Silicon tiles) and the detector plane with the coded mask and the camera thermal control system.
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Author(s): Emrah Kalemci, Sabanci Univ. (Turkey); Onur Turhan, TÜBITAK Space Technologies Research Institute (Turkey); Irfan Kuvvetli, DTU Space (Denmark); Stéphane Schanne, CEA-IRFU (France); Margarita Hernanz, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (Spain); Piotr Orleanski, Space Research Ctr. Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Müberra Sungur, TÜBITAK Space Technologies Research Institute (Turkey); Christoph Tenzer, Institut für Astronomie und Astrophysik Tübingen, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Ahmet Onat, Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey); Ayhan Bozkurt, Sabanci Univ. (Turkey); Jose L. Galvez, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (Spain); Soren Brandt, DTU Space (Denmark); Konrad R. Skup, Malgorzata Michalska, Space Research Ctr. Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Denis Tcherniak, DTU Space (Denmark); Mehmet A. Baltaci, Sabanci Univ. (Turkey)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The eXTP (enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry) mission is a joint large mission of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and European partners designed to study the state of matter under extreme conditions of density, gravity and magnetism. One of the four major instruments on eXTP is the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) which consist of 3 pairs of coded mask cameras with a total combined Field of View (FoV) of 90×180 degrees at zero response. With its enormous FoV, a source localization accuracy of 1 arcmin and an energy range of 2-50 keV the primary objective of the WFM is to provide triggers for the pointing instruments on the eXTP with less than one day reaction time. This presentation discusses the details of the processing hardware and the interaction between different software components of the WFM on eXTP.
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Author(s): F. Zwart, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); R. Tacken, Neways Electronics International N.V. (Netherlands); J. J. M. in't Zand, R. de la Rie, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); M. Limpens, C. Kochanowski, Neways Electronics International N.V. (Netherlands); G. Aitink-Kroes, C. van Baren, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); J. Bayer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); D. Baudin, CEA-IRFU (France); F. Ceraudo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Y. Evangelista, INAF-Instituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziale (Italy), INFN Sezione Tor Vergata (Italy); M. Feroci, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy), INFN Sezione Tor Vergata (Italy); M. Frericks, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); J.-L. Gálvez, Institute of Space Sciences (Spain); O. Gevin, CEA-IRFU (France); M. Hernanz, A. Hormaetxe, Institute of Space Sciences (Spain); P. Laubert, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); A. Meuris, CEA-IRFU (France); J. Nab, J. Neelis, Neways Electronics International N.V. (Netherlands); C. Tenzer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); C. Vogel, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); G. Zampa, INFN Sezione di Trieste (Italy)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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One of the four instruments on the Chinese-European enhanced X-ray Timing Polarimetry (eXTP) mission is the Wide Field Monitor (WFM), consisting of 6 coded-aperture cameras. The detector plane of each camera is comprised of four 7x7 cm2 silicon drift detectors with assembled on their back side a similarly sized printed circuit board (PCB) with the front-end electronics (FEE) that read out the detectors. The PCB is a thick film circuit based on Al2O3. The FEE will have naked ASICs along two opposite sides. These are connected to 384 detector anode output pads per side. The detector will be biased with voltages down to -1300V. Electrical connections between detector, ASICs and FEE are made by bond wires. The detector/electronics assembly needs cooling and high positional stability. All materials and parts shall be without technology originating from the USA. We discuss the development of a demonstration model.
12181-136
Author(s): YanJi Yang, Yong Chen, Jia Ma, Zeyu Song, Ke Yu, Weichun Jiang, Yusa Wang, JiaWei Zhang, Shaohuai Wang, DongXu Liu, Min Cong, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Yupeng Xu, HuiLin He, Institute of High Energy Physics (China), Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Stefano Basso, Marta Civitani, Giovanni Pareschi, Giorgia Sironi, Daniele Spiga, Vincenzo Cotroneo, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); LiZhi Sheng, PengFei Qiang, Yongqing Yan, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (China); Baosheng Zhao, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (Italy); Bo Wang, Langping Wang, DianLong Wang, Fei Ding, Duo Li, Jiadai Xue, Qiuyan Liao, Harbin Institute of Technology (China)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
12181-137
Author(s): PengFei Qiang, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (China); Yanji Yang, Key Lab. of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Yongqing Yan, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (China); Yupeng Xu, Key Lab. of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Lizhi Sheng, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (China); Yong Chen, Key Lab. of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Xianghui Yang, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (China); Huilin He, Jiawei Zhang, Key Lab. of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics (China)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The electron deflector is mounted between X-ray telescope and focal plane detector, and it is used to deflect the incident electrons and prevent them from hitting the detector and causing irreversible damage, which is also benefit to reduce the background noise generated by charged particles such as electrons. The electron deflector is consists of several spokes, and different standard permanent magnets are arranged on each of the spokes. When the electrons enter this area, they will be deflected and cannot enter the focal plane detector because of the magnets form a static magnetic field in the space between the adjacent spokes. In this paper, we will design and optimize the number of electronic deflector spokes, permanent magnet number, permanent magnet intensity and arrangement mode, and finally realize the eXTP satellite load requirements.
12181-138
Author(s): Jia Ma, YanJi Yang, Yusa Wang, Yong Chen, Yupeng Xu, Weichun Jiang, Aimei Zhang, Xiaojing Liu, Zeyu Song, Min Cong, JiaWei Zhang, Zijian Zhao, Xiongtao Yang, Dongjie Hou, Can Chen, Ke Yu, HuiLin He, Institute of High Energy Physics (China)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The scientific target of the enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry (eXTP) is to study the extreme physical processes near black holes and inside and on the surface of neutron stars. The focusing mirror assemblies are the core devices of SFA and PFA. The main component of the mirror assembly is the mirror module. It consists of the mirror spider with 45 nested Wolter I Nickel Gold focusing mirrors, which are assembled at normal temperature 20℃. Since the deviation from normal temperature would cause deformation and reduced angular resolution due to thermal expansion, the objective of the thermal control is to keep the temperature within the range of 20±1℃. In order to control temperature and compensate the heat lose of the mirror module, an active thermal control scheme is applied. The heating system consists of five kinds of heater that are stick on the spider, the blocking shell and the mirror interface structure.
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Author(s): Zeyu Song, Jia Ma, Juan Wang, Aimei Zhang, Yusa Wang, Yanji Yang, Weichun Jiang, Yong Chen, Ke Yu, Sheng Yang, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Yupeng Xu, Huilin He, Institute of High Energy Physics (China), Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Fangjun Lu, Shuangnan Zhang, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Stefano Basso, Marta Civitani, Giovanni Pareschi, Giorgia Sironi, Daniele Spiga, Vincenzo Cotroneo, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Lizhi Sheng, Yongqing Yan, PengFei Qiang, Baosheng Zhao, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics (China)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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CANCELED: Improving the eXTP/LAD detector energy resolution with a refined sensor design
Author(s): Gianluigi Zampa, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The eXTP/LAD detector builds around linear silicon drift detectors read out by dedicated CMOS application-specific integrated circuits. Strict constraints on power consumption and energy resolution (200 eV FWHM at 6 keV for single-channel events, ≤240 eV FWHM overall), impose a stringent trade-off. We are developing a refined sensor architecture to improve performance following two strategies: first by confining the signal-charge diffusion during drift to a single channel, secondly by focusing this charge to a smaller anode reducing the preamplifier’s noise contribution. Preliminary results show single-anode events increasing from 60% to >94% for an overall energy resolution of 183 eV FWHM.
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CANCELED: Development of the end-to-end simulator of the eXTP/WFM instrument
Author(s): Francesco Ceraudo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Fabio Crescenti, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain); Yuri Evangelista, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Margarita Hernanz, Ander Hormaetxe, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain); Jean In't Zand, Lucien Kuiper, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Alessandro Patruno, Institut de Ciències de l'Espai, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The Wide-Field Monitor of the eXTP mission is a system of six coded-mask aperture cameras based on large-area multi-anode linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD), that will simultaneously observe one third of the sky in the 2-50 keV range. We are currently developing an end-to-end simulator to assess the scientific performances of the instrument as well as the algorithms for image reconstruction. Firmly rooted in the physics of photon-matter interactions, it accounts for all the subsystems contributing to the formation of the scientific signal, along with the photon reconstruction (energy and two-dinensional position on the focal plane) performed by the on-board electronics. Non-ideal effects (e.g. noise and mechanical misalignment) can also be easily adjusted by the user.
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Author(s): Hao Xiong, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Andrea Argan, INAF (Italy); David Baudin, CEA (France); Jörg Bayer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Florent Bouyjou, CEA (France); Nicolas De Angelis, University of Geneva, DPNC (Switzerland); Ettore Del Monte, Yuri Evangelista, INAF (Italy); Yannick Favre, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Marco Feroci, INAF (Italy); José-Luis Galvez, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain); Paul Hedderman, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Margarita Hernanz, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain); Aline Meuris, CEA (France); Samuel Pliego-Caballero, Andrea Santangelo, Chris Tenzer, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Alessio Trois, INAF (Italy); Xianqi Wang, Eberhard Karls Univ. Tübingen (Germany); Gianluigi Zampa, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Merlin R. Kole, University of Geneva, DPNC (Switzerland)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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Two of the four instruments onboard the future mission "enhanced X-ray Timing Polarimetry" (eXTP) are contributed by a European consortium: the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM). Both are based on designs originally proposed for the ESA M3 candidate mission LOFT and make use of a high number of large-area Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) that are organised in 40 modules of 16 detectors each for the LAD and in 6 cameras with 4 detectors each for the WFM. The high multiplicity of this concept with thousands of ASICs on the front-end electronics and very high data rates call for a novel, hierarchical data processing scheme. Back-end electronics control the readout of the detectors and carry out the first stage of event processing and filtering in near real-time. Higher level functionalities are performed then on the already reduced data stream. We present the results of first performance verification tests with prototypes of the individual electronics boards.
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CANCELED: Characterization of the full-scale linear Silicon Drift Detector for eXTP/LAD
Author(s): Francesco Ceraudo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Pierluigi Bellutti, Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Italy); Giuseppe Bertuccio, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Mirko Boezio, Walter Bonvicini, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Riccardo Campana, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Yuri Evangelista, Marco Feroci, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Francesco Ficorella, Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Italy); Mauro Fiorini, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica cosmica Milano (Italy); Marco Grassi, Piero Malcovati, Univ. degli Studi di Pavia (Italy); Riccardo Munini, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Antonino Picciotto, Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Italy); Alexander Rashevsky, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Irina Rashevskaya, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications (Italy), Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Andrea Vacchi, Univ. degli Studi di Udine (Italy); Gianluigi Zampa, Nicola Zampa, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italy); Nicola Zorzi, Fondazione Bruno Kessler (Italy)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The Large Area Detector of the eXTP mission will feature an unprecedented active area (6.1 m2 of geometric surface) thanks to the adoption of large linear Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD). We present the characterization of a single full-scale SDD for eXTP/LAD, in which for the first time the response of all anodes is tested. An array of twenty 32-channel VEGA Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ten per side) is used to read out the 224 anodes (112 per side) of the sensor. The spectral capabilities are assessed under different operating conditions, and geometrical effects (e.g. inter-anode response and boundary phenomena) are also studied.
12181-144
Author(s): Ugo Lo Cicero, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Marco Barbera, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Nicola Montinaro, Univ. de Genève (Switzerland), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Fabio D’Anca, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy), Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy); Michela Todaro, Elena Puccio, Univ. degli Studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Luisa Sciortino, Univ. degli studi di Palermo (Italy), INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo "Giuseppe Salvatore Vaiana" (Italy); Filippo Ambrosino, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Riccardo Campana, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Tianxiang Chen, Yong Chen, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Yuri Evangelista, Marco Feroci, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Na Gao, Institute of High Energy Physics (China); Christian Gollwitzer, Evelyn Handick, Michael Krumrey, Christian Laubis, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany); Fangjun Lu, Yupeng Xu, Institute of High Energy Physics (China)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The LAD (Large Area Detector) instrument, onboard the Sino-European mission eXTP (enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry), will perform single-photon, high-resolution timing and energy measurements, in the energy range 2–30 keV, with a large collecting area. Its silicon drift detectors need shielding from NIR/Vis/UV light by astrophysical sources and the bright Earth, to avoid performance degradation. Filters made of an Al coated thin polyimide (PI) membrane will guarantee the needed out-of-band rejection while offering high X-ray transparency. They will be placed between the detectors and the capillary plate plate collimators, open to the external environment. The mission is now in phase B2 and a baseline design for the filters was produced. We describe the filter design and modeling activity, and report the characterization performed so far on X-ray transmission, pinhole and defects, thermo-vacuum cycling endurance, and bright Earth optical load shielding properties.
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Author(s): Hai Jin, Chengzhe Li, Jiao Ding, Jiejia Liu, Wei Cui, Tsinghua Univ. (China); Jun Shen, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (China)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is one of the key components for the HUBS cooling system. The ADR will be used to cool the microcalorimeter down to its operating temperature (below 100mK) and hold the temperature stable to the 1uK level. An ADR prototype is now under development at Tsinghua University. It is composed of two stages: with an FAA stage guarded a GGG stage. With the two stages connected by a superconducting heat switch, tests show that the FAA stage is now capable of reaching a temperature of about 50mK. Temperature regulation was performed with this prototype at 100mK, showing temperature fluctuation at the uK level. The ADR prototype is in the process of being integrated with a mechanical cooler. We will present preliminary test results on the system.
12181-147
Author(s): Wei Zhang, Jianwei Wang, Jin Yang, Guojun Xia, Yibo Cai, Xi Lu, Shanghai Institute of Satellite Engineering (China); Zhanshan Wang, Tongji Univ. (China); Wei Wang, Shanghai Institute of Satellite Engineering (China); Wei Cui, Tsinghua Univ. (China)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The space-based observation is necessary to realize the scientific targets of HUBS, therefore, the design and construction of satellite mission architecture are particularly important, and it mainly includes launching, entering orbit, establishing the initial state of detection, starting and running working modes, etc. In addition, to ensure the imaging detection quality of X-ray payload, the focusing optics and the superconducting transition edge sensor array of X-ray need to maintain a long-term defocus / off-axis control amount better than ±1mm in a large space span of nearly 3m. Meanwhile, in order to jointly provide the peripheral conditions of mechanical and thermal to support the needs of imaging indicators, the temperature control indicator needs to ensure 20℃±2℃ for low thermal conductivity materials of the optics. Based on the introduction of satellite mission architecture, the article mainly focuses on the solutions to the key technologies of mechanical and thermal designs.
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Author(s): Yingyu Chen, Yining Zheng, Liliang Ying, Bo Gao, Zhen Wang, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (China)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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SQUID series array (SSA) amplifier is a key device in HUBS signal readout system. OurSSA amplifier usually adopts a first-order gradiometer design. To accelerate the iterative optimization of the design, we use numerical tools to simulate the working characteristics of the SSA, the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. A typical SSA is composed of 22 single SQUID. The peak to peak value of the SSA output voltage can be as large as 730 uV, and the voltage transfer function can reach 3.5 mV/fai. We combined the SSA and a sensor SQUID to form a two-stage current amplification circuit. The input refered noise is lower than7pA/sqrt(Hz), and the system swing rate can reach 5.78×10^6 Φ0/s. On this basis, we will develop a time division multiplexing SQUID readout system.
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Author(s): Kumi Ishikawa, Takatoshi Murakawa, Daiki Ishi, Masaki Numazawa, Aoto Fukushima, Sae Sakuda, Tomoki Uchino, Ayata Inagaki, Hiromi Morishita, Yoko Ueda, Luna Sekiguchi, Yukine Tsuji, Yuichiro Ezoe, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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We have been developing an X-ray collimator for GEO-X. Since the GEO-X telescope has high aperture efficiency, it is thought to be susceptible to the effect of stray light. In order to obtain enough S/N ratio (e.g >10), we consider whether to introduce a collimator in front of the telescope. When we adopt a collimator with thickness of 300-micrometer and pore width of 30-micrometer at 10-micrometer intervals, the S/N ratio will reach >10 at orbital altitude of 60 Re and 7 deg elongation. We will report the design and fabrication of the collimator.
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Author(s): Roland H. den Hartog, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Phil Uttley, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Henk Hoevers, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Jan-Willem den Herder, Michael Wise, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands), Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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An X-ray Interferometer (XRI) has recently been proposed as a theme for ESA's Voyage 2050 planning cycle, with the prospect to observe the X-ray sky with unprecedented angular resolution. A scientifically very interesting mission is possible on the basis of a single spacecraft with a resolving power of 100 micro arcsec (~0.5 nrad), owing to the compact 'telephoto' design proposed in 2004 by Willingale. One of the key challenges for such a mission is to acquire and maintain pointing to an absolute accuracy below that resolution. This challenge was already identified by Gendreau et al. in 2003. In this paper we re-address this issue in the light of recent technological developments.
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Author(s): Giovanni Lombardi, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Vasco Mendes, Alessio Trois, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari (Italy); Gianluca Morgante, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Francesco Ceraudo, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Raffaele Piazzolla, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (Italy)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The eXTP (enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry) mission is a major project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and China National Space Administration (CNSA) currently performing a phase B study f launch in 2027/2028. The eXTP scientific payload envisages a suite of instruments offering unprecedented simultaneous wide-band X-ray timing and polarimetry sensitivity. A large European consortium is contributing to the eXTP study and it is expected to provide key hardware elements, including the Large Area Detector (LAD) composed by 40 modules for a total effective area of 3.0 m2 at 6.0 keV. In this paper we describe the design solutions adopted for the most important thermo-mechanical design drivers of the LAD Module, which have been elaborated and used for the demonstration of compliance to the system requirements at spacecraft level. We report the mechanical design for the Module and its components, the results of static and dynamic finite element analysis of a simplified model and
Session PS11: Posters - Detectors/Others
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
12181-154
Author(s): Eric D. Miller, Gregory Prigozhin, Beverly J. LaMarr, Marshall W. Bautz, Richard F. Foster, Catherine E. Grant, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Craig S. Lage, Univ. of California, Davis (United States); Christopher Leitz, MIT Lincoln Lab. (United States); Andrew Malonis, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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To take advantage of high-resolution optics sensitive to a broad energy range, future X-ray imagers will require thick detectors with small pixels. This pixel aspect ratio affects spectral response in the soft X-ray band, vital for many science goals, as charge produced by the photon interaction near the entrance window diffuses across multiple pixels and is potentially lost. To understand these subtle but significant effects and inform design of future detectors, we present simulations of charge diffusion using a variety of detector characteristics, assessing spectral response at several energies. We validate the simulations with real CCD data. We finally show how high-pixel-aspect-ratio devices present challenges for measuring the backside passivation performance due to the magnitude of other processes that degrade spectral response.
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Author(s): D. R. Wilkins, S. W. Allen, Stanford Univ. (United States); E. D. Miller, M. Bautz, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); T. Chattopadhyay, Stanford Univ. (United States); R. Foster, C. E. Grant, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); S. C. Herrmann, Stanford Univ. (United States); R. Kraft, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States); R. G. Morris, Stanford Univ. (United States); P. Nulsen, G. Schellenberger, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The sensitivity of astronomical X-ray detectors is limited by the instrumental background. The background is especially important when observing low surface brightness sources that are critical for many of the science cases targeted by future X-ray observatories, including Athena and future US-led flagship or probe-class X-ray missions. Above 2keV, the background is dominated by signals induced by cosmic rays. We develop novel machine learning algorithms to identify events in next-generation X-ray imaging detectors and to predict the probability that an event is induced by a cosmic ray vs. an astrophysical X-ray photon, enabling enhanced filtering of the cosmic ray-induced background. We find that by learning typical correlations between the secondary events that arise from a single primary, machine learning algorithms are able to successfully identify cosmic ray-induced background events that are missed by traditional filtering methods, reducing the background by up to 30 per cent.
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Author(s): Juan Zhang, Mingyu Ge, Youli Tuo, Shijie Zheng, Institute of High Energy Physics (China)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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CANCELED: XGIS and WFM-IS: imaging performances above 150 keV
Author(s): Enrico Virgilli, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Leo Cavazzini, Univ. degli Studi di Ferrara (Italy); Riccardo Campana, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Filippo Frontera, Cristiano Guidorzi, Lisa Ferro, Miguel Moita, Univ. degli Studi di Ferrara (Italy); Claudio Labanti, Ezequiel J. Marchesini, Fabio Fuschino, Lorenzo Amati, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy); Piero Rosati, Univ. degli Studi di Ferrara (Italy); Ezio Caroli, John B. Stephen, Natalia Auricchio, INAF - Osservatorio di Astrofisica e Scienza dello Spazio (Italy)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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An innovative detection system based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD) coupled with crystal scintillator bars has been developed for X-/gamma-ray broad energy passband detectors in astrophysics. This configuration, proposed for XGIS on board THESEUS, allows for a compact broad energy passband detector (2 - 10/20 MeV). The same concept has been adopted for the WFM-IS on board ASTENA. A coded mask system provides imaging capabilities up to 150 keV. Above this limit Compton kinematics can enable imaging capability up to 10 MeV. We present the result of simulations devoted to evaluating the imaging performances of both instruments.
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Author(s): Hiroki Akamatsu, Davide Vaccaro, Luciano Gottardi, Jan van der Kuur, Cor P. de Vries, Marcel P. Bruijn, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Matteo D'Andrea, INAF - Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (Italy); Jian-Rong Gao, Jan-Willem A. den Herder, Ruud W. M. Hoogeveen, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands); Mikko Kiviranta, VTT Technical Research Ctr. of Finland Ltd. (Finland); Anton J. van der Linden, Brian D. Jackson, Kenichiro Nagayoshi, Kevin Ravensberg, Marcel L. Ridder, Emanuele Taralli, Sven Visser, Martin de Wit, SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research (Netherlands)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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We are developing Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) read-out of Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) for future space observatories and non-astronomical laboratory applications. In order to read 1000's pixels TES array, the signal multiplexing readout technology is one of the most critical components. Recently, we have successfully demonstrated a 37-pixels FDM multiplexing readout for TES micro-calorimeters. The summed performance is 2.23 eV at 5.9 keV. In this contribution, we report on the development of FDM readout technology and on the performance of TESs array under an AC bias at MHz frequencies.
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Author(s): Paul P. Plucinsky, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States); Herman Marshall, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States); Akos Bogdan, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) was launched over 23 years ago and has been delivering spectacular science over the course of its mission. The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) is the prime instrument on the satellite, conducting over 90% of the observations. The CCDs operate at a temperature of -120 C and the optical blocking filter (OBF) in front of the CCDs is at a temperature of approximately -60 C. The surface of the OBF has accumulated a layer of contamination over the course of the mission, as it is the coldest surface exposed to the interior to the spacecraft. We have been characterizing the thickness, chemical composition, and spatial distribution of the contamination layer as a function of time over the mission. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of the current contamination model using the most recent calibration observations conducted in 2021 and 2022.
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Author(s): S. Merlin Hart, Donovan K. Smith, Kendall Mitchell, Brigham Young Univ. (United States)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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Aluminum is the material of choice for next generation broad band space telescopes. A problem with aluminum is that without a protective capping layer, oxidation occurs immediately upon contact with the atmosphere. This oxidation greatly reduces the reflectance of aluminum at extreme ultra-violet wavelengths. This is a region in the electromagnetic spectrum that holds much interest. We put aluminum thin films in low-oxygen environments and measured the growth of aluminum oxide on these films. We were able to retard the oxidation on these aluminum thin films by two orders of magnitude. The different environments and techniques are explained.
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Author(s): Benjamin Criton, Jean-Luc Sauvageot, Xavier de la Broïse, CEA (France); Stefanos Marnieros, Lab. de Physique des 2 Infinis Irène Joliot-Curie, CNRS (France)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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Today's X-ray astronomy requires large detector arrays with very high spectral resolution. State-of-the-art TES sensors suffer from their 50 mK SQUID readout power dissipation, setting a limit to the detector size. We propose a new superconductive alloy, the NbSi, promising both very high spectral resolution (around 1.5 eV from simulations) and ultra-low power dissipation due to their inherent high resistivity values. We perform simulations to optimize NbSi pixel's geometry before manufacturing. We conduct experiments on the latter optimized pixels in cryostat for X-ray and noise measurements. Furthermore, an on-chip pulse injection system enables a better understanding of the pixel's response by determining the transient response of the detector at various energies.
Session PS12: Posters: Gamma-ray and Polarization
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
Conference attendees are invited to attend the poster session. Come view the posters, enjoy light refreshments, ask questions, and network with colleagues in your field. Each day represents a different set of posters.

Poster Authors: Please set up your poster between 10am and 4pm on the assigned day.

View poster presentation guidelines and set-up instructions
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Author(s): Wataru Kamogawa, Hironori Matsumoto, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Quin Abarr, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Hisamitsu Awaki, Ehime Univ. (Japan); Richard Bose, Dana Braun, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Gianluigi de Geronimo, Stony Brook Univ. (United States); Paul Dowkontt, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Teruaki Enoto, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Manel Errando, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Yasushi Fukazawa, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Akihiro Furuzawa, Fujita Health Univ. (Japan); Thomas Gadson, NASA Wallops Flight Facility (United States); Ephraim Gau, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Victor Guarino, Guarino Engineering (United States); Shuichi Gunji, Yamagata Univ. (Japan); Kiyoshi Hayashida, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Scott Heatwole, NASA Wallops Flight Facility (United States); Fumiya Imazato, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Kazunori Ishibashi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Manabu Ishida, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Nirmal Iyer, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden), The Oskar Klein Ctr. for Cosmoparticle Physics (Sweden); Keon Harmon, NASA Wallops Flight Facility (United States); Fabian Kislat, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Mózsi Kiss, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden), The Oskar Klein Ctr. for Cosmoparticle Physics (Sweden); Takao Kitaguchi, RIKEN (Japan); Henric Krawczynski, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); James Lanzi, NASA Wallops Flight Facility (United States); Lindsey Lisalda, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Yoshitomo Maeda, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan); Hiroto Matake, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Taisei Mineta, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Takuya Miyazawa, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate Univ. (Japan); Tsunefumi Mizuno, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Takashi Okajima, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States); Mark Pearce, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden), The Oskar Klein Ctr. for Cosmoparticle Physics (Sweden); Zachary Peterson, NASA Wallops Flight Facility (United States); Brian Rauch, Nicole Cavero, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Felix Ryde, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden), The Oskar Klein Ctr. for Cosmoparticle Physics (Sweden); Sean Spooner, The Univ. of New Hampshire (United States); Theodor-Adrian Stana, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden), The Oskar Klein Ctr. for Cosmoparticle Physics (Sweden); David Stuchlik, NASA Wallops Flight Facility (United States); Hiromitsu Takahashi, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Tomoshi Takeda, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Mai Takeo, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Toru Tamagawa, RIKEN (Japan); Hiroshi Tsunemi, Osaka Univ. (Japan); Nagomi Uchida, Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Keisuke Uchiyama, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Andrew West, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States); Eric Wulf, U.S. Naval Research Lab. (United States); Yuto Yoshida, Tokyo Univ. of Science (Japan); Garry Simburger, Washington Univ. in St. Louis (United States)
On demand | Presented live 20 July 2022
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XL-Calibur is a balloon-borne mission for hard X-ray polarimetry. The first launch is currently scheduled from Sweden in summer 2022. The telescope’s design is identical to the Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT, conically-approximated Wolter-I optics) on board ASTRO-H. A final performance evaluation was conducted in June 2021 and the experiment yields (at the direction of its optical axis determined) the effective area of 175 cm^2 and 73 cm^2 at 30 keV and 50 keV, respectively, with its half-power diameter of the beam as 2.1 arcmin. This report describes the optical performance of the telescope for XL-Calibur in more detail.
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Author(s): Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Yuna Tsuji, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Shinichiro Takeda, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan), iMAGINE-X Inc. (Japan); Keigo Okuma, Mii Ando, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Shin Watanabe, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); Masahiko Kobayashi, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Naoki Ishida, Technical Ctr. of Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Tadayuki Takahashi, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Mitsunobu Onishi, Toshihiko Arai, iMAGINE-X Inc. (Japan); Yuki Omiya, Manari Oguchi, Atsuya Tanaka, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
20 July 2022 • 18:00 - 20:00 EDT | Room 516
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The SGD onboard the Hitomi satellite was an innovative narrow field-of-view Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton telescope (Si/CdTe-SCT) working in sub-MeV, which aims at background reduction through deep active-shielding combined with SCT. SGD was able to detect ~100 keV polarization of the Crab Nebula with a ~5 ks short exposure. Based on the achievement, we propose a new approach, "narrow field-of-view Si/CdTe-SCT at balloon altitude". Balloon is free from SAA activation, and the deep active shield shall stop many of the albedo gamma-rays stronger near horizon. miniSGD is a small detector for verification of the concept, with all the sub-systems integrated; a single layer of 0.5 mm thick double-sided Si strip detectors (DSSD) and a newly developed 2 mm thick CdTe double sided strip detectors (CdTe-DSD), surrounded by BGO scintillator crystals. The detector is to fly as a piggy-back payload in the 2023 Spring campaign of JAXA Ballooning team at Alice Springs, Australia.