16 - 21 June 2024
Yokohama, Japan
Conference 13093 > Paper 13093-155
Paper 13093-155

Designing a compact, self-contained control and power system for a DMD-based spectrograph suitable for the space environment

On demand | Presented live 17 June 2024

Abstract

Multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) is a technique in astronomy that allows for the simultaneous acquisition of multiple celestial objects spectra within a single field of view; this is an enabling capability for the next generation of NASA’s missions, including the Habitable Worlds Observatory and beyond. As part of previous NASA-funded technology maturation efforts, we have demonstrated that multi-object spectroscopy in space could be performed with a digital micromirror device (DMD) - a commercial micromirror array designed for display applications. Building on those efforts, we began a NASA APRA program to build the Spectroscopic Ultraviolet Multi-Object Observatory (SUMO) Prototype (a DMD-based spectrograph) with the intention to deploy it in the space environment as a secondary payload on the University of Colorado Boulder sounding rocket INFUSE. This will be the first time a DMD-based instrument is operated in space. The SUMO Prototype consists of: a DMD manufactured by Texas Instruments, an off-the-shelf camera for the imaging channel, a custom NUV CCD camera developed in-house at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) for the spectral channel, a Raspberry Pi for the on board computer, a custom controller for the DMD, and an electrical power system (EPS) powering the entirety of the SUMO prototype. This system has the requirement of being controlled autonomously, as the system is a secondary payload on the sounding rocket without downlinking capability. The research involved on this mission includes efforts to understand the processes of star formation and galaxy evolution. The SUMO Prototype is nominally scheduled for flight in the Spring of 2025.

Presenter

William Snyder
Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States)
William Snyder is a Graduate Research Assistant at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics working on electronics for the Colorado Ultraviolet Spectroscopy Program. He is currently studying for a MS in Electrical Engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder with a focus in Power Electronics.
Presenter/Author
William Snyder
Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States)
Author
Grace M. Halferty
Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States)
Author
Dmitry Vorobiev
Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States)
Author
Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States)
Author
Brian T. Fleming
Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics (United States)