16 - 21 June 2024
Yokohama, Japan
Conference 13093 > Paper 13093-58
Paper 13093-58

In-orbit performance of the XMA for XRISM/Resolve

19 June 2024 • 13:50 - 14:05 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F

Abstract

The X-ray astronomy satellite XRISM, which was launched in 2023, carries a high-energy resolution X-ray spectrometer called Resolve. The X-ray Mirror Assembly (XMA) is the X-ray optics of XRISM and Resolve's XMA is called Resolve-XMA. The performance of the Resolve-XMA was extensively measured on the ground and verified to meet the requirements. This presentation reports on the performance of the Resolve-XMA with first observations in orbit. The aim point determination and its accuracy will be presented. The effective area will be measured at different energies. The PSF will be measured in Resolve's 3'x3' FoV with its 35 pixels. With these measurements, we will judge whether the on-board performance differs from the ground measurement result and meets the requirement.

Presenter

NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Dr. Takayuki Hayashi has been working on the X-ray Mirror Assembly (XMA) of the X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission (XRISM) project. Two XMAs are equipped with the XRISM satellite and one of them is for an X-ray micro-calorimeter (Resolve) and the other one is for an X-ray CCD (Xtend). Dr. Hayashi completed the XMA ground calibration in May of 2022 at the 100m X-ray beamline in the Goddard Space Flight Center and delivered the XMAs to Japan where the spacecraft was launched. Dr. Hayashi is leading the development of the Calibration Data Base (CalDB) of the XMA and the analysis of the XRISM initial inflight data.
Application tracks: Astrophotonics
Presenter/Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
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NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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Tahir Yaqoob
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
Michael Loewenstein
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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Gary A. Sneiderman
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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Renata S. Cumbee
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
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Yoshitaka Ishisaki
Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan)
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Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
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Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
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Rikkyo Univ. (Japan)
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Univ. of Teacher Education Fukuoka (Japan)
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Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
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Yoshiaki Kanemaru
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
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Meiji Univ. (Japan)
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Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan), Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
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Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan (United States)
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Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
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Aysegul Tumer
Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research (United States)
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Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University (Japan)
Author
Laura Brenneman
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (United States)
Author
Matteo Guainazzi
European Space Agency (ESA), European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) (United States)