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Nanguang Chen

Dr. Nanguang  Chen

Associate Professor
National University of Singapore
Faculty of Engineering
Division of Bioengineering
9 Engineering Dr. 1
#EA-03-12
  117576
Singapore

tel: +65 6516-4401
fax: +65 6872-3069
E-mail: biecng@nus.edu.sg
Web: http://www.bioeng.nus.edu.sg/people/chenng/

Area of Expertise

Holography, Pattern Recognition, Perception

Biography

Dr. Nanguang Chen received his PhD in Biomedical Engineering in 2000 from Tsinghua University. He also receive his MS in Physics and BS in Electrical Engineering in 1994 (Peking University), and 1988 (Hunan University), respectively. He joined the Optical and Ultrasound Imaging Lab at the University of Connecticut in 2000 as a postdoctoral fellow and then became an Assistant Research Professor in 2002. Since 2004, he has been a faculty member with the Division of Bioengineering at National University of Singapore and his current position is Associate Professor. His research interests include diffuse optical tomography, optical coherence tomography, and novel microscopic imaging methods. He has published more than 50 journal papers and filed 6 patent applications.

Lecture Title(s)

Focal modulation microscopy: a novel molecular imaging method for thick biological tissues
Optical microscopy has been an indispensible tool for biological research and clinical applications. Many important breakthroughs in this field enable researchers to visualize microscopic structures and functions that would not be available with conventional techniques. We have been developing a fluorescence microscopy method, Focal Modulation Microscopy (FMM), that offers a penetration depth comparable to OCT and MPM, while compatible with most fluorescence dyes. The FMM method replies on a spatial-temporal phase modulator inserted into the excitation light path to introduce intensity modulation confined within the focal volume. The modulated fluorescence emission can be readily differentiated from the static background attributed to the scattered excitation photons. Theoretical models have been established to evaluate the FMM signal and background in a turbid medium. It is found that the signal to background ratio can be much improved compared with confocal microscopy (CM), especially when the focal point moves deep inside the sample. The theoretical results have been validated by other imaging experiments. An imaging depth around 600 microns has been achieved with lipid tracer labeled animal tissue by the use of our prototype FMM system. Currently we are working towards high speed image acquisition and noise reduction.

Time domain diffuse optical tomography: novel implementations
Non-invasive optical imaging of large human organs, such as human brain and breast, is desirable for disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring. However, human soft tissues are highly scattering for visible and near-infrared light. We are interested in time-resolved diffuse optical tomography (DOT), a technique that is based on measuring the pathlength resolved diffusive light intensity on tissue surfaces We have developed a pseudo-random bit sequence based approach to implement fast measurement with high signal to noise ratio. A prototype time-resolved DOT system has been built and characterized with phantom experiments. Preliminary results from studies with healthy human subjects as well as breast cancer patients will be presented.

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Hillenkamp 2017


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