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Conference 13006 > Paper 13006-89
Paper 13006-89

Real-time video funduscopy with continuously moving fixation target

On demand | Presented live 9 April 2024

Abstract

project, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, attempts to improve the accessibility of diagnostic instruments for glaucoma screening. The presented approach aims to realize real-time nearinfrared video fundus imaging that enables the use of targeted fixation stimuli to ensure continuous imaging. The integration of near-infrared illumination with a wavelength of 780 nm not only avoids pupil constriction, but also enables mesopic imaging in darkened ambient light, ensuring optimal visualization of the retinal structure. This innovative system achieves nearly reflection-free imaging through polarized illumination with polarization-dependent beam paths. Its primary aim is to capture extensive fundus areas to facilitate correlations with linear optical coherence tomography (LOCT) measurements. In the future, the fundus setup will be integrated into the LOCT setup. In this research project, the primary aim is to generate images of the optic nerve, but it is also possible to carry out examinations of the macula. Unlike from traditional fundus cameras, this system has a controllable screen for generating individual fixation stimuli, which creates continuous eye movements and enables controlled imaging. The main objective is to capture large fundus areas and track eye positions to combine this information with the LOCT measurements A-scan positions, which enables the creation of B-scans with irregular geometries. This approach replaces the need for complex scanning systems by leveraging natural eye movements. The approach can thus be used to detect retinal pathologies in a different way and could therefore be used for more comprehensive diagnostic and scientific applications.

Presenter

Technische Hochschule Köln (Germany)
David Harings holds both a Bachelor's and Master's degree in electrical engineering, with a specialization in optical technologies. Furthermore, he has also successfully completed a Master's degree in computer science & engineering. Presently, he is an doctoral student at the Institute of Quantum Optics at Leibniz University Hannover. His current professional role finds him working at the Institute for Applied Optics and Electronics at the Cologne University of Applied Sciences. His research within the FALCO project (Fourier Algorithm Based Low-Cost OCT) focuses on the development of a funduscopy setup, aimed at advancing the field of scannerless OCT imaging.
Presenter/Author
Technische Hochschule Köln (Germany)
Author
Technische Hochschule Köln (Germany)
Author
Technische Hochschule Köln (Germany)
Author
Technische Hochschule Köln (Germany)
Author
Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany)