16 - 21 June 2024
Yokohama, Japan
Conference 13093 > Paper 13093-82
Paper 13093-82

The Line Emission Mapper (LEM) probe mission concept

20 June 2024 • 16:30 - 16:50 Japan Standard Time | Room G414/415, North - 4F

Abstract

The Line Emission Mapper (LEM) is a Probe mission concept developed in response to NASA’s APEX AO. LEM consists of one science instrument composed of a large area, wide-field X-ray optic and a microcalorimeter X-ray imaging spectrometer. LEM is optimized to observe low-surface brightness diffuse X-ray emission over a 30’x30’ field of view with 1.3-2.5 eV spectral resolution in the 0.2-2.0 keV band. Our primary science will be to map in emission the thermal, kinetic, and elemental properties of the diffuse gas in galaxies, the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the filamentary structures between these clusters, and in the Milky Way star formation regions and Galactic halo, and Galactic and Local Group supernova remnants. LEM will spend ~11% of its five-year prime science mission performing an All-Sky Survey – the first All-Sky X-ray survey at high spectral resolution. The remainder of the time will be divided between the directed science (30%) and competed General Observer science (70%). In this presentation, we will give a mission overview, the directed science that drives the mission design, and the broad scope that these capabilities offer the astrophysics community.

Presenter

Ralph P. Kraft
Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)
Dr. Kraft is a senior astrophysicist at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Principal Investigator for the Chandra High Resolution Camera, and Principal Investigator for the Line Emission Mapper Probe Mission Concept.
Presenter/Author
Ralph P. Kraft
Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)
Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
Akos Bogdan
Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)
Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
Renata S. Cumbee
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
Author
Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. (United States)
Author
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Author
Massimiliano Galeazzi
Univ. of Miami (United States)
Author
Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)
Author
Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)
Author
Edmund Hodges-Kluck
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik (Germany)
Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
Maxim Markevitch
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)
Author
Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)
Author
Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)
Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)
Author
Markus Rau
The Univ. of Chicago (United States)
Author
James Steiner
Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)
Author
Yuanyuan Su
Univ. of Kentucky (United States)
Author
Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States)
Author
Kimberly Weaver
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Author
Irina Zhuravleva
The Univ. of Chicago (United States)
Author
John Zuhone
Ctr. for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (United States)