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Proceedings Paper

Consideration of cerebrospinal fluid intensity variation in diffusion weighted MRI
Author(s): Colin B. Hansen; Vishwesh Nath; Allison E. Hainline; Kurt G. Schilling; Prasanna Parvathaneni; Roza G. Bayrak; Justin A. Blaber; Owen Williams; Susan Resnick; Lori Beason-Held; Okan Irfanoglu; Carlo Pierpaoli M.D.; Adam W. Anderson; Baxter P. Rogers; Bennett A. Landman
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Paper Abstract

Diffusion weighted MRI (DW-MRI) depends on accurate quantification signal intensities that reflect directional apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC). Signal drift and fluctuations during imaging can cause systematic non-linearities that manifest as ADC changes if not corrected. Here, we present a case study on a large longitudinal dataset of typical diffusion tensor imaging. We investigate observed variation in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) regions of the brain, which should represent compartments with isotropic diffusivity. The study contains 3949 DW-MRI acquisitions of the human brain with 918 subjects and 542 with repeated scan sessions. We provide an analysis of the inter-scan, inter-session, and intra-session variation and an analysis of the associations with the applied diffusion gradient directions. We investigate a hypothesis that CSF models could be used in lieu of an interspersed minimally diffusion-weighted image (b0) correction. Variation in CSF signal is not largely attributable to within-scan dynamic anatomical changes (3.6%), but rather has substantial variation across scan sessions (10.6%) and increased variation across individuals (26.6%). Unfortunately, CSF intensity is not solely explained by a main drift model or a gradient model, but rather has statistically significant associations with both possible explanations. Further exploration is necessary for CSF drift to be used as an effective harmonization technique.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 March 2019
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 10948, Medical Imaging 2019: Physics of Medical Imaging, 109482G (1 March 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2512949
Show Author Affiliations
Colin B. Hansen, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Vishwesh Nath, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Allison E. Hainline, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Kurt G. Schilling, Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Ctr. (United States)
Prasanna Parvathaneni, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Roza G. Bayrak, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Justin A. Blaber, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Owen Williams, National Institutes of Health (United States)
Susan Resnick, National Institutes of Health (United States)
Lori Beason-Held, National Institutes of Health (United States)
Okan Irfanoglu, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (United States)
Carlo Pierpaoli M.D., National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (United States)
Adam W. Anderson, Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Ctr. (United States)
Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Baxter P. Rogers, Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Ctr. (United States)
Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Bennett A. Landman, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10948:
Medical Imaging 2019: Physics of Medical Imaging
Taly Gilat Schmidt; Guang-Hong Chen; Hilde Bosmans, Editor(s)

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