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Proceedings Paper

In vivo imaging of radiopaque resorbable inferior vena cava filter infused with gold nanoparticles
Author(s): Li Tian; Patrick Lee; Burapol Singhana; Aaron Chen; Yang Qiao; Linfeng Lu; Jonathan Martinez; Ennio Tasciotti; Megan C. Jacobsen; Adam Melancon; Mark McArthur; Mitch Eggers; Steven Huang; Marites P. Melancon
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Paper Abstract

Radiopaque resorbable inferior vena cava filter (IVCF) were developed to offer a less expensive alternative to assessing filter integrity in preventing pulmonary embolism for the recommended prophylactic period and then simply vanishes without intervention. In this study, we determined the efficacy of gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-infused poly-p-dioxanone (PPDO) as an IVCF in a swine model.

Infusion into PPDO loaded 1.14±0.08 % AuNP by weight as determined by elemental analysis. The infusion did not alter PPDO’s mechanical strength nor crystallinity (Kruskal−Wallis one-way ANOVA, p<0.05). There was no cytotoxicity observed (one-way ANOVA, p<0.05) when tested against RF24 and MRC5 cells. Gold content in PPDO was maintained at ~2000 ppm during the 6-week incubation in PBS at 37oC.

As a proof-of-concept, two pigs were deployed with IVCF, one with AuNP-PPDO and the other without coating. Results show that the stent ring of AuNP-PPDO was highly visible even in the presence of iodine-based contrast agent and after clot introduction, but not of the uncoated IVCF. Autopsy at two weeks post-implantation showed AuNP-PPDO filter was endothelialized onto the IVC wall, and no sign of filter migration was observed. The induced clot was also still trapped within the AuNP-PPDO IVCF.

As a conclusion, we successfully fabricated AuNP-infused PPDO IVCF that is radiopaque, has robust mechanical strength, biocompatible, and can be imaged effectively in vivo. This suggests the efficacy of this novel, radiopaque, absorbable IVCF for monitoring its position and integrity over time, thus increasing the safety and efficacy of deep vein thrombosis treatment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 March 2018
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 10576, Medical Imaging 2018: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling, 105762S (13 March 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2293738
Show Author Affiliations
Li Tian, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Patrick Lee, SUNY Upstate Medical Univ. (United States)
Burapol Singhana, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Thammasat Univ. (Thailand)
Aaron Chen, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Yang Qiao, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Linfeng Lu, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Rice Univ. (United States)
Jonathan Martinez, Houston Methodist (United States)
Ennio Tasciotti, Houston Methodist (United States)
Megan C. Jacobsen, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Adam Melancon, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Mark McArthur, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Mitch Eggers, Adient Medical Inc. (United States)
Steven Huang, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Marites P. Melancon, The Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10576:
Medical Imaging 2018: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling
Baowei Fei; Robert J. Webster III, Editor(s)

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