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Proceedings Paper

Laser-induced immune modulation inhibits tumor growth in vivo (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Giulia Ottaviani; Valentina Martinelli; Katia Rupel; Nicoletta Caronni; Asma Naseem; Lorenzo Zandonà; Giuseppe Perinetti; Margherita Gobbo; Roberto Di Lenarda; Rossana Bussani; Federica Benvenuti; Mauro Giacca; Matteo Biasotto; Serena Zacchigna

Paper Abstract

Photobiomodulation stands as a recommended therapy for oral mucositis induced by oncological therapies. However, its mechanisms of action and, more importantly, its safety in cancer patients, are still unclear. We assessed cancer cell metabolism and proliferation in vitro and in vivo after exposure to different laser protocols. We exploited both ectopic melanoma and a more physiological oral carcinogenesis mouse model, followed by molecular, histological and immunohistochemical characterization. Laser irradiation resulted in a slightly increase in cell metabolism and proliferation in vitro, albeit each protocol exerted a difference response. Of notice, in vivo laser light reduced tumour growth and invasiveness, indicating e beneficial effect on tumor microenvironment. Laser-treated tumors were surrounded and infiltrated by immune cells, mainly lymphocytes and dendritic cells, paralleled by an enhanced secretion of type I interferons. In contrast, the number of pro-angiogenic macrophages was reduced in response to laser irradiation, with consequent normalization of the tumor vasculature. Based on these finding we have also started exploring the effect of photobiomodulation on lymphocyte response in an experimental model of vaccination. Preliminary data indicate that laser light induced antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses. In conclusion, our data point toward photobiomodulation as an effective strategy to boost the immune response in vivo, with relevant, therapeutic activities in both cancer and vaccination experimental models. These results support the safe use of laser light on cancer patients and open the way to innovative therapeutic opportunities.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 April 2017
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 10048, Mechanisms of Photobiomodulation Therapy XII, 100480F (19 April 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2257477
Show Author Affiliations
Giulia Ottaviani, The International Ctr. for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (Italy)
Valentina Martinelli, The International Ctr. for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (Italy)
Katia Rupel, University of Trieste (Italy)
Nicoletta Caronni, The International Ctr. for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (Italy)
Asma Naseem, The International Ctr. for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (Italy)
Lorenzo Zandonà, Univ. degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)
Giuseppe Perinetti, Univ. degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)
Margherita Gobbo, Univ. degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)
Roberto Di Lenarda, Univ. degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)
Rossana Bussani, Univ. degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)
Federica Benvenuti, The International Ctr. for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (Italy)
Mauro Giacca, The International Ctr. for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (Italy)
Matteo Biasotto, Univ. degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)
Serena Zacchigna, Univ. degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10048:
Mechanisms of Photobiomodulation Therapy XII
Michael R. Hamblin; James D. Carroll; Praveen Arany, Editor(s)

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