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Light absorption properties of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in adjacent waters of the Changjiang Estuary during a flood season: implication for DOC estimation
Author(s): Yangyang Liu; Fang Shen; Xiuzhen Li
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Paper Abstract

Light absorption properties of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in adjacent waters of the Changjiang Estuary were investigated during the summer of 2013. CDOM absorption showed a substantial portion of the total absorption and clearly dominant among most investigation stations. It generally decreased from the northwest to the southeast, which controlled by physical mixing of fresh water and seawater as was indicated by a conservative behaviour of CDOM. CDOM absorption sharply increased during phytoplankton blooms. Similarly, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) also peaked during blooms period. However, DOC exhibited a more complex behavior relative to a simple conservative mixing, possibly attributed to multiple origins of DOC. CDOM absorption and DOC co-varied to some degree, implying a potential way of DOC estimation from CDOM absorption. However, more detailed information such as CDOM and DOC composition and more validation data were required to obtain a stable CDOM – DOC pattern. Lastly, empirical algorithms with limited data were developed to retrieve CDOM absorption. Further validation of the algorithms were needed when they were to be commonly applied.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 December 2014
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 9261, Ocean Remote Sensing and Monitoring from Space, 92610K (2 December 2014); doi: 10.1117/12.2069245
Show Author Affiliations
Yangyang Liu, East China Normal Univ. (China)
Fang Shen, East China Normal Univ. (China)
Xiuzhen Li, East China Normal Univ. (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9261:
Ocean Remote Sensing and Monitoring from Space
Robert J. Frouin; Delu Pan; Hiroshi Murakami, Editor(s)

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