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Proceedings Paper

Development of a wide-field fluorescence imaging system for evaluation of wound re-epithelialization
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Paper Abstract

Normal skin barrier function depends on having a viable epidermis, an epithelial layer formed by keratinocytes. The transparent epidermis, which is less than a 100 mum thick, is nearly impossible to see. Thus, the clinical evaluation of re-epithelialization is difficult, which hinders selecting appropriate therapy for promoting wound healing. An imaging system was developed to evaluate epithelialization by detecting endogenous fluorescence emissions of cellular proliferation over a wide field of view. A custom-made 295 nm ultraviolet (UV) light source was used for excitation. Detection was done by integrating a near-UV camera with sensitivity down to 300 nm, a 12 mm quartz lens with iris and focus lock for the UV regime, and a fluorescence bandpass filter with 340 nm center wavelength. To demonstrate that changes in fluorescence are related to cellular processes, the epithelialization of a skin substitute was monitored in vitro. The skin substitute or construct was made by embedding microscopic live human skin tissue columns, 1 mm in diameter and spaced 1 mm apart, in acellular porcine dermis. Fluorescence emissions clearly delineate the extent of lateral surface migration of keratinocytes and the total surface covered by the new epithelium. The fluorescence image of new epidermis spatially correlates with the corresponding color image. A simple, user-friendly way of imaging the presence of skin epithelium would improve wound care in civilian burns, ulcers and surgeries.

Paper Details

Date Published: 8 March 2013
PDF: 4 pages
Proc. SPIE 8565, Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics IX, 85650T (8 March 2013); doi: 10.1117/12.2008476
Show Author Affiliations
Walfre Franco, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Harvard Medical School (United States)
Enoch Gutierrez-Herrera, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Harvard Medical School (United States)
Martin Purschke, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Harvard Medical School (United States)
Ying Wang, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Harvard Medical School (United States)
Josh Tam, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Harvard Medical School (United States)
R. Rox Anderson, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Harvard Medical School (United States)
Apostolos Doukas, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Harvard Medical School (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8565:
Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics IX
Andreas Mandelis; Brian Jet-Fei Wong; Anita Mahadevan-Jansen; Henry Hirschberg M.D.; Hyun Wook Kang; Nikiforos Kollias; Melissa J. Suter; Kenton W. Gregory M.D.; Guillermo J. Tearney M.D.; Stephen Lam; Bernard Choi; Steen J. Madsen; Bodo E. Knudsen M.D.; E. Duco Jansen; Justus F. Ilgner M.D.; Haishan Zeng; Matthew Brenner; Laura Marcu, Editor(s)

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