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Spie Press Book

The Art and Science of Holography: A Tribute to Emmett Leith and Yuri Denisyuk
Editor(s): H. John Caulfield
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Book Description

This volume celebrates both the triumphs and the consummate details of one of the most creative fields in optics: the art and science that is modern holography. Through anecdotal narratives and rigorous mathematical analyses, this book reveals the elegance of the field pioneered by physicists Yuri Denisyuk and Emmett Leith. Many highly regarded holographers worldwide have contributed chapters to this work. It explores all of the modern holographic advances and ponders the role holography will play in future technology. This volume also includes a free CD-ROM: CDS231 - Optics and Photonics 2006: A Tribute to Holography Pioneers Emmett Leith and Yuri Denisyuk.


Book Details

Date Published: 22 January 2004
Pages: 372
ISBN: 9780819450197
Volume: PM124

Table of Contents
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Contents
Preface / xiii
Charles M. Vest
Editor's Preface / xv
H. John Caulfield
Chapter 1. Holography Reinvented / 1
Stephen A. Benton
1.1 Dennis Gabor / 1
1.2 Emmett N. Leith / 2
1.3 Yuri Nicholaevitch Denisyuk / 4
Acknowledgments / 6
References / 6
Chapter 2. Holography: Origin, Development, and Beyond / 7
Francis T. S. Yu and Suganda Jutamulia
2.1 Origin / 7
2.2 Development / 10
2.3 Beyond / 20
References / 28
Chapter 3. A Generalization of the Theory of Holographic Coherence Confocal Imaging / 31
Emmett N. Leith, Kurt D. Mills, Wei-Chen Chien, Brian D. Athey, and David S. Dilworth
3.1 Introduction / 31
3.2 Spectrally Broad Source / 35
3.3 Grating Analysis / 37
3.4 Some Final Remarks / 41
Acknowledgments / 42
References / 43
Chapter 4. Optical Transforms in Digital Holography / 45
Leonid Yaroslavsky
4.1 Digital Holography: The Revival after Hibernation (a Second Wind) / 45
4.2 Physical Reality vs. the Computer World: The Difficulty in Representing Optical Signals and Transforms in Computers / 47
4.3 The Convolution Integral and Digital Filtering in the Signal Domain / 49
4.4 The Fourier Integral and Discrete Fourier Transforms / 51
4.5 Integral and Discrete Fresnel Transforms / 55
References / 60
Chapter 5. Electronic Holographic Interferometry and Its Photographic Origin / 61
Karl A. Stetson
5.1 Introduction / 61
5.2 Current State of the Art / 61
5.3 Enabling Technologies / 63
5.4 How It All Began / 66
5.4.1 Coherent optics and holography / 66
5.4.2 The problem of the holograms / 68
5.4.3 Holographic interferometry / 69
5.4.4 Aftermath / 70
References / 71
Chapter 6. Innovative Holographic Approaches for High-Resolution Image Reconstruction / 73
Zeev Zalevsky and Kurt Mills
6.1 Introduction / 73
6.2 Broad-source Holographic Reconstruction Using Wavelet Encoding / 74
6.2.1 Holographic reconstruction with incoherent illumination / 74
6.2.2 Wavelet transform and a multistage holographic recording / 76
6.2.3 The recording process / 77
6.2.4 D.C. term reduction and the admissible condition / 79
6.2.5 Experimental results / 80
6.3 Spatially Partially Incoherent Broad Spectrum 3D Holography / 83
6.3.1 Theoretical discussion / 83
6.3.2 Experimental results / 88
6.4 A Generalized 'First Arriving Light' Approach for Resolving Images that Are Viewed Throughout a Scattering Medium / 91
6.4.1 Technical discussion / 92
6.4.2 Experimental results / 96
6.5 Triple-correlation Processing for Imaging Through Scattering or Turbulent Mediums in Medically Related Applications / 99
6.5.1 Triple correlation / 99
6.5.2 Experimental results / 101
6.6 Increased Resolution for Synthetic Aperture Imaging / 103
6.6.1 Analysis / 105
6.6.2 Simulation / 107
References / 109
Chapter 7. Image Formation and the Retransformation of Coherence Functions / 111
William T. Rhodes
7.1 Introduction / 111
7.2 Planar Quasi-monochromatic Objects / 113
7.3 The Addition of Color / 117
7.4 Extension to 3D Objects / 117
7.5 Coherence Function Transformations, Enhanced Backscatter, and Superresolving Imaging Systems / 119
7.5.1 Special case: enhanced backscatter / 122
7.5.2 Special case: superresolving imaging system / 123
7.6 Concluding Remarks / 126
Acknowledgments / 126
References / 126
Chapter 8. Holography and the Wigner Function / 129
Adolf W. Lohmann, Markus E. Testorf, and Jorge Ojeda-Casta�eda
8.1 Introduction / 129
8.2 The Wigner Toolbox / 130
8.3 The Holographic Principle / 134
8.4 The Wigner Chart Applied to Holography / 136
8.4.1 The image plane hologram / 136
8.4.2 Fourier holography / 137
8.4.3 Fresnel holography / 139
8.5 Storage Requirements of Holography / 140
8.6 Summary / 143
References / 143
Chapter 9. Observation of Light Propagation by Holography Using an Ultrashort-Pulsed Laser / 145
Toshihiro Kubota
9.1 Introduction / 145
9.2 Recording Process / 146
9.3 Reconstruction Process / 147
9.4 Observation of Light Propagation Using a Picosecond-pulsed Laser / 148
9.4.1 Refraction of light in a glass block / 148
9.4.2 Total reflection inside the glass block / 150
9.4.3 Diffraction of a grating / 150
9.5 Observation of Light Propagation Using a Femtosecond-pulsed Laser / 150
9.6 Conclusions / 154
Acknowledgments / 154
References / 154
Chapter 10. Processing and Detection of Femtosecond Waveforms Using Ultrafast Dynamic Holography / 157
Dmitriy Panasenko, Rostislav Rokitski, Nikola Alic, Dan M. Marom, Yuri Mazurenko, Pang-Chen Sun, and Yeshaiahu Fainman
10.1 Introduction / 157
10.2 Space-to-time Conversion with Cascaded Second-order Nonlinearities / 158
10.3 Time-to-space Conversion Processor�Femtosecond-pulse Imager / 162
10.4 Generalized Ultrafast Processing / 164
10.5 Phase-sensitive Detection of Femtosecond Laser Pulses Using Sonogram Generation / 166
10.6 Conclusions / 170
References / 170
Chapter 11. Denisyuk Holography: From Lippmann Photography to Color Holography / 173
Hans I. Bjelkhagen
11.1 Introduction / 173
11.2 Lippmann Photography / 175
11.2.1 History of interferential photography / 175
11.2.2 The principle of interferential photography / 176
11.2.3 Modern Lippmann photography / 178
11.3 Color Holography / 184
11.3.1 History of color holography / 184
11.3.2 Recording materials / 185
11.3.3 Laser wavelengths for color holograms / 186
11.3.4 Recording color holograms / 188
11.4 Conclusions / 191
Acknowledgments / 194
References / 197
Chapter 12. Multicolor Holograms / 201
P. Hariharan
12.1 Multicolor Transmission Holograms / 201
12.2 Multicolor Reflection Holograms / 202
12.3 Light Sources / 203
12.4 Multicolor Rainbow Holograms / 205
12.5 Pseudocolor Holograms / 207
12.6 Multicolor Stereograms / 208
12.7 Embossed Holograms / 209
12.8 Conclusions / 209
References / 209
Chapter 13. Optical Encoding of 3D Correlation for Color Pattern Recognition / 213
Josep Nicol�s and Juan Campos
13.1 Introduction / 213
13.2 Color Images Described by 3D Functions / 216
13.3 Three-dimensional Fourier Transform / 217
13.4 Correlation of 3D Functions for Color Pattern Recognition / 218
13.4.1 Three-dimensional correlation filters for color pattern recognition / 219
13.5 Optical Implementation / 223
13.5.1 Encoding of 3D functions in 2D images / 223
13.5.2 Encoding of the 3D Fourier transform / 226
13.5.3 Encoding of the 3D correlation / 228
13.6 Experimental Results / 232
13.7 Summary / 234
Acknowledgments / 235
References / 235
Chapter 14. Holograms of Volumes and Volume Holograms / 239
Joseph Shamir
14.1 Introduction / 239
14.2 Holograms,Wavefronts and Information / 240
14.3 Holography - Planar Recording Medium / 245
14.4 Holography - Volume Recording Medium / 247
14.5 Special Cases in Volume Recording / 250
14.5.1 Ideal hologram recording and reconstruction / 250
14.5.2 All plane-wave recording / 251
14.6 Volume Recording with Paraxial Systems / 253
14.6.1 The paraxial approximation / 253
14.6.2 Generic architecture for volume holography / 254
14.6.3 The motion blur / 258
14.7 Conclusions / 259
Acknowledgments / 259
References / 260
Chapter 15. Color Conical Holographic Stereograms: Recording and Distortion Compensation Methods / 261
Luis Manuel Murillo-Mora, Katsuyuki Okada, Toshio Honda, and Jumpei Tsujiuchi
15.1 Introduction / 261
15.2 Methods of Color Holographic Stereogram Synthesis / 262
15.2.1 Original 2D images / 262
15.2.2 Hologram-recording method / 263
15.2.3 Color conical holographic stereogram recording setup / 265
15.2.4 First experimental results / 266
15.3 Distortion and Perspective Analysis / 267
15.3.1 Image-processing method / 267
15.3.2 Simulation and results / 268
15.3.3 Experimental results / 270
15.4 Conclusion / 271
References / 273
Chapter 16. Teaching Holography / 275
Tung H. Jeong
References / 284
Chapter 17. The Role of Centric-minded Holography in Material Sciences / 285
Pal Greguss
17.1 Introduction / 285
17.2 Omnidirectional Holograms (ODH) / 286
17.3 ODH at Work: Omnidirectional Interferometry / 288
17.4 Peripheral Holography - Exoscope Holography / 288
17.5 Conclusion / 289
References / 289
Chapter 18. Solar Holography / 291
Juanita R. Riccobono and Jacques E. Ludman
18.1 Introduction / 291
18.1.1 Solar power generation / 291
18.1.2 Solar lighting / 291
18.1.3 Solar heating / 291
18.1.4 Solar rejection of certain wavelengths / 292
18.1.5 Reduction of reflection losses at certain wavelengths / 292
18.2 Fabrication / 292
18.3 Applications / 294
18.3.1 Photovoltaic concentration / 294
18.3.2 Daylighting / 297
18.3.3 Thermal / 298
18.3.4 Solar chemistry and detoxification / 299
18.3.5 Antireflection / 300
18.4 Conclusion / 300
References / 301
Chapter 19. Analytical Theory for Efficient Surface-Relief Gratings in the Resonance Domain / 307
M.A. Golub and A.A. Friesem
19.1 Introduction / 307
19.2 Surface-relief Grating and Corresponding Graded-index Diffraction Grating Model / 308
19.3 Coupled-wave Equations for the Surface-relief Grating / 312
19.4 Resonance-domain Surface-relief Gratings with High Diffraction Efficiency / 317
19.5 The Limits for the Equivalent Graded-indexModel of the Efficient Surface-relief Grating / 324
19.6 Conclusion / 326
References / 326
Chapter 20. From Holography to Relativity / 329
Nils Abramson
20.1 Introduction / 329
20.2 The Holodiagram: A Practical Device for the Creation and Evaluation of Holograms / 329
20.3 Light-in-flight Recording by Holography / 332
20.4 Einstein's Special Relativity Theory / 333
20.5 Spheres of Observation Transformed into Ellipsoids of Observation / 336
20.6 Graphic Calculations of Time Dilation and Apparent Lorentz Contraction / 339
20.7 Intersecting Minkowski Light Cones / 342
20.8 Conclusion / 344
References / 345
Chapter 21. The BizarreWorld of the Holographic Brain / 347
H. John Caulfield
21.1 Introduction / 347
21.2 Beliefs about Holograms / 348
21.3 Beliefs about Brains / 351
21.4 Attributions to Pribram / 352
21.5 Attributions to Bohm / 353
21.6 Selected Nonsense for Bathroom Reading / 353
21.7 Beyond Science / 355
References / 355
Index / 357

Preface

Charles M. Vest
MIT (USA)

Holography is an important development in physics and technology. Its importance is signaled by the elegant simplicity of the central ideas of Emmett Leith and Yuri Denisyuk. These ideas have continued as essential concepts even as the technology by which they are realized and the applications for which they are utilized have advanced dramatically over the last forty years.

Holography's importance is also attested to by its continuing ability to inspire and excite those who encounter it for the first time. Few if any other scientific concepts or technologies of the second half of the twentieth century are so readily accessible in their basic form to those with little scientific or engineering training. Thus, the art community, young students, and professional scientists and engineers, have all benefited from the work of Leith, Denisyuk and of many of the other contributors to this volume.

The genesis of the Leith-Upatnieks off-axis hologram, which gave birth to holography as we know it today, and the grand idea of Denisyuk, who combined holography with Lipmann photography to create reflection holography and color holography, are nicely traced in the chapter by Yu and Jutamulia and that by Bjelkhagen. Indeed, these two chapters present excellent outlines of the entire field.

The contributors to this volume pursue their work in a plethora of nations and institutions. Many were important pioneers in the field. They have continued to make holography an important part of their scientific inquiry or engineering applications.

In an age when most celebrated scientific theory is far too complex to be penetrated by anyone other than a highly trained and talented few, and when most exciting technology requires expensive and sophisticated apparatus, basic holography remains remarkably accessible. This allows its use in the education of a wide range of students, as attested to in the chapter by Tung Jeong. Of course, it can also be misappropriated and confused as noted in John Caulfield's essay on misguided attempts to explain the functioning of the brain using holographic concepts.

It is striking to note how many things are technically possible today that could only have been dreamt in the early days of holography. The advances of computational power and high-resolution detectors and displays make possible digital holography and signal processing (Yaroslavsky) and electronic holographic interferometry (Stetson). Such advances overcome key problems of the early days such as the time delay associated with photographic processing, and vastly improve the ease of fringe analysis and extend the range of motions that can be studied. The sheer information content, processing capacity and speed, flexibility, and spacebandwith that can routinely be utilized today was almost imponderable in the early days.

We must remember that Leith and Upatnieks and Denisyuk did their original work using highly filtered mercury vapor lamps imaged through small apertures. Nonetheless, He-Ne cw lasers soon became available and instantly improved the ease and accessibility of holographic techniques. By contrast, modern techniques based on holography can be used to study and manipulate femtosecond waveforms (Panasenko, et al.). Indeed, Kubota presents beautiful images of light propagation through prisms, gratings and other elements captured by holograms made with ultrashort laser pulses. Looking ahead, our imaginations regarding the future of holography readily soar as we think about recent work on Bose condensates that demonstrates interference phenomena in matter waves, or when we look at the rapid advance toward x-ray lasers.

Emmett Leith and Yuri Denisyuk have left us the legacy of a fundamentally different way of working with light. That in turn brought us 3D imaging, a variety of ways of processing optically encoded information, and new means of visualizing and measuring various physical phenomena. Readers of this volume will see this legacy.However, Leith and Denisyuk also brought to their scientific thought and its exposition a marvelous clarity that all of us should strive to emulate in our careers.


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